Schools shut as teachers walk out on strike

Schools shut as teachers walk out on strike

Schools shut as teachers walk out on strike

First published in News The Bolton News: Photograph of the Author by , education reporter

MORE than half of schools in Bolton are shut today as teachers in Bolton walked out in protest of Government changes to education.

Striking teachers gathered outside Bolton Sixth Form College this morning before making their way to Manchester for a mass rally.

The one-day walkout, called by the National Union of Teachers (NUT) — one of the biggest teaching unions — is the latest move in its continuing campaign of industrial action.

It is in protest against changes to terms and conditions, which they say are damaging children’s education.

Julia Simpkins, secretary of the Bolton branch of the NUT, said: “This action comes back to the same thing — all we are asking is for Mr Gove, the Education Secretary, to have meaningful talks with teachers, teachers know about education, they are trained in it.”

She added: “This action is being reported as being about pay, of course we would like more pay who wouldn’t, but to say it is all about that is disingenuous.

“It is about what is happening to children’s education in this country, the privatisation of it, non-qualified teachers being allowed to teach.

“We have had a lot of support this morning, which really lifts the spirits.”

Michael Gove yesterday wrote to seven union bosses setting out the progress he believed had been made in talks between the department for education and teaching unions.

In it, he said he wanted to underline his commitment to the talks process, but the NUT said the letter showed how little progress had been made in the talks.

The NUT has been embroiled in its dispute with the Government for more than two years, and staged a series of regional strikes with the NASUWT teaching union last year.

A proposed one-day national walkout in November by the two unions was called off and the NASUWT has decided not to take part in today's strike.

Comments (11)

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10:23am Wed 26 Mar 14

atlas123 says...

Back to work please....


One of the few professions Maggie T didn't get around to sorting out.

Public support is NOT with you.
Back to work please.... One of the few professions Maggie T didn't get around to sorting out. Public support is NOT with you. atlas123
  • Score: 16

10:34am Wed 26 Mar 14

Chrome1 says...

Breaking News, Breaking News!!! The world has known about this for weeks and for the BN it's breaking news.
Breaking News, Breaking News!!! The world has known about this for weeks and for the BN it's breaking news. Chrome1
  • Score: 2

10:51am Wed 26 Mar 14

Tim Burr says...

atlas123 wrote:
Back to work please....


One of the few professions Maggie T didn't get around to sorting out.

Public support is NOT with you.
You're right, it isn't. It's teachers gnashing their teeth again - without taking any responsibility for the thousands leaving school who can't read or write and since 2009 persistently bottom of the class in numeracy and reading for a so called developed country.
[quote][p][bold]atlas123[/bold] wrote: Back to work please.... One of the few professions Maggie T didn't get around to sorting out. Public support is NOT with you.[/p][/quote]You're right, it isn't. It's teachers gnashing their teeth again - without taking any responsibility for the thousands leaving school who can't read or write and since 2009 persistently bottom of the class in numeracy and reading for a so called developed country. Tim Burr
  • Score: 13

11:23am Wed 26 Mar 14

mdavies11 says...

Mobs on the street subverting democracy, what could go wrong
Mobs on the street subverting democracy, what could go wrong mdavies11
  • Score: 6

11:24am Wed 26 Mar 14

Blackrod says...

Right or wrong the cost of this on the town is harsh. Said before, nurses can't strike but have to take time off when others do for childcare. Tax payers pay for agency staff and others then complain when standards not met, or savings not made. End of march means there is no leave left so has to be carers leave. Other services/industry will be the same. Only good thing is traffic reduction!
Right or wrong the cost of this on the town is harsh. Said before, nurses can't strike but have to take time off when others do for childcare. Tax payers pay for agency staff and others then complain when standards not met, or savings not made. End of march means there is no leave left so has to be carers leave. Other services/industry will be the same. Only good thing is traffic reduction! Blackrod
  • Score: 4

12:28pm Wed 26 Mar 14

cosmicma says...

roads were quite clear when i took my young un to school this morning :)
roads were quite clear when i took my young un to school this morning :) cosmicma
  • Score: 14

2:01pm Wed 26 Mar 14

Lynn57 says...

atlas123 wrote:
Back to work please....


One of the few professions Maggie T didn't get around to sorting out.

Public support is NOT with you.
So teachers are expected to control ever growing classes with varying cultures and languages to cope with, deal with discipline issues, autocratic heads, ignorant rough parents, inspections, school trips, constant attacking by right wing media and Cameron too? As well as marking until the wee hours and lesson planning. Would you do it for a starting salary of £21000 for a graduate profession? 1 percent is an insult. Behind you all the way teachers I have seen my good friend burnt out after 25 years of that job.
[quote][p][bold]atlas123[/bold] wrote: Back to work please.... One of the few professions Maggie T didn't get around to sorting out. Public support is NOT with you.[/p][/quote]So teachers are expected to control ever growing classes with varying cultures and languages to cope with, deal with discipline issues, autocratic heads, ignorant rough parents, inspections, school trips, constant attacking by right wing media and Cameron too? As well as marking until the wee hours and lesson planning. Would you do it for a starting salary of £21000 for a graduate profession? 1 percent is an insult. Behind you all the way teachers I have seen my good friend burnt out after 25 years of that job. Lynn57
  • Score: 1

2:05pm Wed 26 Mar 14

Lynn57 says...

Tim Burr wrote:
atlas123 wrote:
Back to work please....


One of the few professions Maggie T didn't get around to sorting out.

Public support is NOT with you.
You're right, it isn't. It's teachers gnashing their teeth again - without taking any responsibility for the thousands leaving school who can't read or write and since 2009 persistently bottom of the class in numeracy and reading for a so called developed country.
Maybe this so called developed country has more pupils per teacher ratio of varying cultures and languages than countries that care more about dedicated professionals. Get a degree, train, become a teacher yourself then come back on public forums with unfounded postulations.
[quote][p][bold]Tim Burr[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]atlas123[/bold] wrote: Back to work please.... One of the few professions Maggie T didn't get around to sorting out. Public support is NOT with you.[/p][/quote]You're right, it isn't. It's teachers gnashing their teeth again - without taking any responsibility for the thousands leaving school who can't read or write and since 2009 persistently bottom of the class in numeracy and reading for a so called developed country.[/p][/quote]Maybe this so called developed country has more pupils per teacher ratio of varying cultures and languages than countries that care more about dedicated professionals. Get a degree, train, become a teacher yourself then come back on public forums with unfounded postulations. Lynn57
  • Score: -1

2:57pm Wed 26 Mar 14

Tim Burr says...

Lynn57 wrote:
Tim Burr wrote:
atlas123 wrote:
Back to work please....


One of the few professions Maggie T didn't get around to sorting out.

Public support is NOT with you.
You're right, it isn't. It's teachers gnashing their teeth again - without taking any responsibility for the thousands leaving school who can't read or write and since 2009 persistently bottom of the class in numeracy and reading for a so called developed country.
Maybe this so called developed country has more pupils per teacher ratio of varying cultures and languages than countries that care more about dedicated professionals. Get a degree, train, become a teacher yourself then come back on public forums with unfounded postulations.
Be a teacher, become a racist eh?
[quote][p][bold]Lynn57[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Tim Burr[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]atlas123[/bold] wrote: Back to work please.... One of the few professions Maggie T didn't get around to sorting out. Public support is NOT with you.[/p][/quote]You're right, it isn't. It's teachers gnashing their teeth again - without taking any responsibility for the thousands leaving school who can't read or write and since 2009 persistently bottom of the class in numeracy and reading for a so called developed country.[/p][/quote]Maybe this so called developed country has more pupils per teacher ratio of varying cultures and languages than countries that care more about dedicated professionals. Get a degree, train, become a teacher yourself then come back on public forums with unfounded postulations.[/p][/quote]Be a teacher, become a racist eh? Tim Burr
  • Score: -7

4:39pm Wed 26 Mar 14

p.rhanna says...

You chose the Profession .....No one forces you to teach......why are these people protesting?
Months of holidays a year..... If it's not for you .....leave....no one is forcing you to stay.
21000 starting salary.....not bad for a Graduate.
Up to 32000 outside of London.
How much is enough ?
You chose the Profession .....No one forces you to teach......why are these people protesting? Months of holidays a year..... If it's not for you .....leave....no one is forcing you to stay. 21000 starting salary.....not bad for a Graduate. Up to 32000 outside of London. How much is enough ? p.rhanna
  • Score: 12

7:41pm Thu 27 Mar 14

berushka says...

all the unions had discussions with the Minister for Education, with the exception of NUT (what a perfectly apt name for these cuckoos!). Because they didn't bother to attend the meeting, they spread mistruths about not being heard and called out their serfs, sorry, members. If the teachers didn't strike, then the union thugs would make their lives a misery. Once upon a time, the unions were formed to discuss concerns with the bosses, because not all the employees could fit in the office; nowadays, they are just a gang of uneducated morons, overpaid and happy to wield a big stick, because outside of the union, they would be nothing but unemployed layabouts. Strange, too, how so many of them either come from the lower class areas of England or from over the border, where daffodils make a good salad. In this century, it is about time the unions were told to go back from whence they came, where the sun doesn't shine.
all the unions had discussions with the Minister for Education, with the exception of NUT (what a perfectly apt name for these cuckoos!). Because they didn't bother to attend the meeting, they spread mistruths about not being heard and called out their serfs, sorry, members. If the teachers didn't strike, then the union thugs would make their lives a misery. Once upon a time, the unions were formed to discuss concerns with the bosses, because not all the employees could fit in the office; nowadays, they are just a gang of uneducated morons, overpaid and happy to wield a big stick, because outside of the union, they would be nothing but unemployed layabouts. Strange, too, how so many of them either come from the lower class areas of England or from over the border, where daffodils make a good salad. In this century, it is about time the unions were told to go back from whence they came, where the sun doesn't shine. berushka
  • Score: -2

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