Dog scrambles to safety after falling though ice

Dog scrambles to safety after falling though ice

Dog scrambles to safety after falling though ice

First published in News

PLAYFUL pooch Frank had a lucky escape after plunging into a frozen pond.

Now Frank’s owners are appealing to other dog-owners to keep their pets on a lead near water as temperatures remain below zero — and never to try to rescue their animals if they fall through ice.

Veterinary nurse, Lisa Edwards, and her daughter, Isobel, aged three, were walking Frank in Queens Park, Bolton, when he bolted towards one of the ponds.

The cross-breed trotted to the middle of the pond when the ice gave way, leaving Frank scrambling around in the water trying to get out.

Terrified but knowing it was dangerous to go into the water after Frank, Mrs Edwards called the police for help.

Mrs Edwards, who owns the Queens Park Veterinary Surgery, in Chorley New Road, with her husband Stuart, said: “We were walking down in the wooded area of the park so my little girl could go sledging and Frank just ran down to the pond and onto the frozen water.

“He was trying to scrabble out but I couldn’t go in after him because people can die trying to rescue their dogs, plus I had my little girl with me. It was terrifying because my first instinct was to go in after him. The thing is I should know better because I work with animals. My husband, who is a vet, couldn’t believe it when I rang and told him what had happened.”

Officers called fire crews but by the time they arrived 18-month-old Frank had managed to climb out of the water.

He was taken to the family’s vet practice and treated for hypothermia.

Mrs Edwards, aged 40, said she hopes other dog-owners can learn from Frank’s close call.

She added: “You should never even risk letting your dog off the lead in these conditions. I should have taken my own advice. Luckily Frank’s fine and made a full recovery. We gave him a warm bath and dried him off and he didn’t seem to care. He’s such a hooligan.”

Firefighters warned people never to venture on to ice. Bolton borough manager, Ian Bailey, said: “Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service has attended a number of incidents over the years where a dog has fallen through the ice — if it can’t take the weight of a dog, it certainly won’t take the weight of a person. Please don’t take the risk. Stay off the ice and if you are walking a dog keep it on a lead.”

For more on ice safety and other seasonal advice from Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service visit safe4winter.com.

Comments (10)

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9:39am Thu 24 Jan 13

oftbewildered2 says...

Thankfully this had a happy ending - it could quite easily have been otherwise; it must have been so difficult not to jump in after the dog. Hope it suffers no ill effects from its ordeal
Thankfully this had a happy ending - it could quite easily have been otherwise; it must have been so difficult not to jump in after the dog. Hope it suffers no ill effects from its ordeal oftbewildered2
  • Score: 0

11:16am Thu 24 Jan 13

aardwolf says...

Didn't jump in just took its photo?
Didn't jump in just took its photo? aardwolf
  • Score: 0

12:03pm Thu 24 Jan 13

marco999 says...

I must admit that I first thought the same thing as aardwolf - the dog is in difficulties but the owner manages to take a photograph of the unfortunate animal struggling. I guess the owner did the right thing under the circumstances but I'm inclined to think that I would have at least tried to get nearer to the pond to help the dog - or maybe find a big stick to smash a way through the ice towards him. I wasn't in this situation though so I shouldn't really comment to be fair - just glad the dog survived to wag his tail another day.
I must admit that I first thought the same thing as aardwolf - the dog is in difficulties but the owner manages to take a photograph of the unfortunate animal struggling. I guess the owner did the right thing under the circumstances but I'm inclined to think that I would have at least tried to get nearer to the pond to help the dog - or maybe find a big stick to smash a way through the ice towards him. I wasn't in this situation though so I shouldn't really comment to be fair - just glad the dog survived to wag his tail another day. marco999
  • Score: 0

1:18pm Thu 24 Jan 13

boltonnut says...

I thought dogs were to be kept on a leash in public places????Dogs are fine,it's the people that own them I'm not to fond of.Glad the dog is okay.Are you sure it's a dog,it resembles a youg lion in the pic.
I thought dogs were to be kept on a leash in public places????Dogs are fine,it's the people that own them I'm not to fond of.Glad the dog is okay.Are you sure it's a dog,it resembles a youg lion in the pic. boltonnut
  • Score: 0

3:59pm Thu 24 Jan 13

bolton-born-n-bred says...

marco999 wrote:
I must admit that I first thought the same thing as aardwolf - the dog is in difficulties but the owner manages to take a photograph of the unfortunate animal struggling. I guess the owner did the right thing under the circumstances but I'm inclined to think that I would have at least tried to get nearer to the pond to help the dog - or maybe find a big stick to smash a way through the ice towards him. I wasn't in this situation though so I shouldn't really comment to be fair - just glad the dog survived to wag his tail another day.
Marco999 has said it for me. I know this vets, they are one of the best, some explanation of how the photo was taken would help the article.

It is VERY good of the Bolton News to publish this and it is very useful as I am at present staying in an area with our dogs which we do not know well and we have a large river near here where people take their dogs for walks.

It certainly makes you think twice about going into an area where you cannot see the water for Ice and snow.
[quote][p][bold]marco999[/bold] wrote: I must admit that I first thought the same thing as aardwolf - the dog is in difficulties but the owner manages to take a photograph of the unfortunate animal struggling. I guess the owner did the right thing under the circumstances but I'm inclined to think that I would have at least tried to get nearer to the pond to help the dog - or maybe find a big stick to smash a way through the ice towards him. I wasn't in this situation though so I shouldn't really comment to be fair - just glad the dog survived to wag his tail another day.[/p][/quote]Marco999 has said it for me. I know this vets, they are one of the best, some explanation of how the photo was taken would help the article. It is VERY good of the Bolton News to publish this and it is very useful as I am at present staying in an area with our dogs which we do not know well and we have a large river near here where people take their dogs for walks. It certainly makes you think twice about going into an area where you cannot see the water for Ice and snow. bolton-born-n-bred
  • Score: 0

6:22pm Thu 24 Jan 13

omylord says...

Cannot believe the stupidity and arrogance of the dogs owner,any responsible owner would have seen the potential for danger and kept the dog on a lead.Realising it was not safe to enter the water she decides to ring the police to come and rescue the dog,obviously expecting a police officer to dive in whilst she films it for you tube.
Cannot believe the stupidity and arrogance of the dogs owner,any responsible owner would have seen the potential for danger and kept the dog on a lead.Realising it was not safe to enter the water she decides to ring the police to come and rescue the dog,obviously expecting a police officer to dive in whilst she films it for you tube. omylord
  • Score: 0

9:48pm Thu 24 Jan 13

BoltonLancs says...

Yep, I'm not sure Veterinary nurse, Lisa Edwards is all there tbh...
Dog not on a lead in icy conditions; watching with her 3yo daughter as Frank struggled to survive; taking a bleeding PHOTO of the poor thing!!!!! And then calling - THE POLICE????
Surely a case of Lisa having enough of taking care of Frank on top of bringing up Isobel..????
Crazy!
Yep, I'm not sure Veterinary nurse, Lisa Edwards is all there tbh... Dog not on a lead in icy conditions; watching with her 3yo daughter as Frank struggled to survive; taking a bleeding PHOTO of the poor thing!!!!! And then calling - THE POLICE???? Surely a case of Lisa having enough of taking care of Frank on top of bringing up Isobel..???? Crazy! BoltonLancs
  • Score: 0

11:53pm Thu 24 Jan 13

QueensParkVeterinarySurgery says...

Time to set a few facts straight.
Dogs should be allowed to run free, as lead-only exercise can never 'tire-out' a young healthy dog.
When Frank went onto, then through the ice, he was 4 foot down a bank and approx 25ft from the edge, the photo has been cropped and doesn't show the full picture. No stick was going to reach him. Bystanders suggested breaking the ice, but this may only have lost his front grip, sending his head under. You should never enter the water to rescue a dog. Period. Sadly people have died trying to rescue their pets from waterways.
The story is slightly inaccurate as Lisa called 999 and asked for fire brigade. After this she rang the practice to prepare us for Franks return and Stuart set out with equipment to try and reach him. During the next 10 minutes or so Lisa could only encourage Frank to make the effort to get back to the edge. During this time, yes, 2 photos were taken, as Lisa thought it would be useful to highlight the dangers of frozen water and dogs. No videos were taken and nothing is on youtube. By the time Stuart and the Fire brigade arrived Frank had struggled free. At the surgery his temperature was 3 degree C below normal, though given the comparatively short duration, being only half submerged, fit and young and being attended to within 5 minutes of getting out of the pond he made a rapid recovery.
Frank is a much loved member of the family who would never knowingly be placed at unreasonable risk.
With reference to the last 2 knee-jerk, ill informed comments above, we can only hope you never suffer an accident, standing by helpless, wanting to do more, explaining to a distraught child why it isn't safe to attempt a rescue despite the fact that you know there may not be a happy ending.
We hope this this accident and coverage means Frank will be the only patient we will be treating for Hypothermia this winter.
We thank the Bolton News for highlighting the danger of frozen water and for all the support we have received from the fellow dog-walkers in Queens Park who know Frank.
Time to set a few facts straight. Dogs should be allowed to run free, as lead-only exercise can never 'tire-out' a young healthy dog. When Frank went onto, then through the ice, he was 4 foot down a bank and approx 25ft from the edge, the photo has been cropped and doesn't show the full picture. No stick was going to reach him. Bystanders suggested breaking the ice, but this may only have lost his front grip, sending his head under. You should never enter the water to rescue a dog. Period. Sadly people have died trying to rescue their pets from waterways. The story is slightly inaccurate as Lisa called 999 and asked for fire brigade. After this she rang the practice to prepare us for Franks return and Stuart set out with equipment to try and reach him. During the next 10 minutes or so Lisa could only encourage Frank to make the effort to get back to the edge. During this time, yes, 2 photos were taken, as Lisa thought it would be useful to highlight the dangers of frozen water and dogs. No videos were taken and nothing is on youtube. By the time Stuart and the Fire brigade arrived Frank had struggled free. At the surgery his temperature was 3 degree C below normal, though given the comparatively short duration, being only half submerged, fit and young and being attended to within 5 minutes of getting out of the pond he made a rapid recovery. Frank is a much loved member of the family who would never knowingly be placed at unreasonable risk. With reference to the last 2 knee-jerk, ill informed comments above, we can only hope you never suffer an accident, standing by helpless, wanting to do more, explaining to a distraught child why it isn't safe to attempt a rescue despite the fact that you know there may not be a happy ending. We hope this this accident and coverage means Frank will be the only patient we will be treating for Hypothermia this winter. We thank the Bolton News for highlighting the danger of frozen water and for all the support we have received from the fellow dog-walkers in Queens Park who know Frank. QueensParkVeterinarySurgery
  • Score: 0

12:14am Fri 25 Jan 13

BoltonLancs says...

As usual Bolton News reporting is a little wayward, but for an owner to photograph a struggling, potentially dying much-loved pet...that is the most disturbing thing about all this!
So glad Frank dug himself out of this situation...but I'm sure he's pretty cheesed off some idiot was snapping away during his nightmare ordeal..!
As usual Bolton News reporting is a little wayward, but for an owner to photograph a struggling, potentially dying much-loved pet...that is the most disturbing thing about all this! So glad Frank dug himself out of this situation...but I'm sure he's pretty cheesed off some idiot was snapping away during his nightmare ordeal..! BoltonLancs
  • Score: 0

10:57pm Sun 27 Jan 13

omylord says...

QueensParkVeterinary
Surgery
wrote:
Time to set a few facts straight.
Dogs should be allowed to run free, as lead-only exercise can never 'tire-out' a young healthy dog.
When Frank went onto, then through the ice, he was 4 foot down a bank and approx 25ft from the edge, the photo has been cropped and doesn't show the full picture. No stick was going to reach him. Bystanders suggested breaking the ice, but this may only have lost his front grip, sending his head under. You should never enter the water to rescue a dog. Period. Sadly people have died trying to rescue their pets from waterways.
The story is slightly inaccurate as Lisa called 999 and asked for fire brigade. After this she rang the practice to prepare us for Franks return and Stuart set out with equipment to try and reach him. During the next 10 minutes or so Lisa could only encourage Frank to make the effort to get back to the edge. During this time, yes, 2 photos were taken, as Lisa thought it would be useful to highlight the dangers of frozen water and dogs. No videos were taken and nothing is on youtube. By the time Stuart and the Fire brigade arrived Frank had struggled free. At the surgery his temperature was 3 degree C below normal, though given the comparatively short duration, being only half submerged, fit and young and being attended to within 5 minutes of getting out of the pond he made a rapid recovery.
Frank is a much loved member of the family who would never knowingly be placed at unreasonable risk.
With reference to the last 2 knee-jerk, ill informed comments above, we can only hope you never suffer an accident, standing by helpless, wanting to do more, explaining to a distraught child why it isn't safe to attempt a rescue despite the fact that you know there may not be a happy ending.
We hope this this accident and coverage means Frank will be the only patient we will be treating for Hypothermia this winter.
We thank the Bolton News for highlighting the danger of frozen water and for all the support we have received from the fellow dog-walkers in Queens Park who know Frank.
To be honest you have confirmed my comments,stupidly arrogant.Let me suggest you employ a dog walker and suggest before posting your practice details you should have thought what the public of Bolton would think.

"THEY CANT LOOK AFTER THEIR OWN DOG,I'M CERTAINLY NOT TRUSTING THEM WITH MINE"

Like i said stupid and arrogant.
[quote][p][bold]QueensParkVeterinary Surgery[/bold] wrote: Time to set a few facts straight. Dogs should be allowed to run free, as lead-only exercise can never 'tire-out' a young healthy dog. When Frank went onto, then through the ice, he was 4 foot down a bank and approx 25ft from the edge, the photo has been cropped and doesn't show the full picture. No stick was going to reach him. Bystanders suggested breaking the ice, but this may only have lost his front grip, sending his head under. You should never enter the water to rescue a dog. Period. Sadly people have died trying to rescue their pets from waterways. The story is slightly inaccurate as Lisa called 999 and asked for fire brigade. After this she rang the practice to prepare us for Franks return and Stuart set out with equipment to try and reach him. During the next 10 minutes or so Lisa could only encourage Frank to make the effort to get back to the edge. During this time, yes, 2 photos were taken, as Lisa thought it would be useful to highlight the dangers of frozen water and dogs. No videos were taken and nothing is on youtube. By the time Stuart and the Fire brigade arrived Frank had struggled free. At the surgery his temperature was 3 degree C below normal, though given the comparatively short duration, being only half submerged, fit and young and being attended to within 5 minutes of getting out of the pond he made a rapid recovery. Frank is a much loved member of the family who would never knowingly be placed at unreasonable risk. With reference to the last 2 knee-jerk, ill informed comments above, we can only hope you never suffer an accident, standing by helpless, wanting to do more, explaining to a distraught child why it isn't safe to attempt a rescue despite the fact that you know there may not be a happy ending. We hope this this accident and coverage means Frank will be the only patient we will be treating for Hypothermia this winter. We thank the Bolton News for highlighting the danger of frozen water and for all the support we have received from the fellow dog-walkers in Queens Park who know Frank.[/p][/quote]To be honest you have confirmed my comments,stupidly arrogant.Let me suggest you employ a dog walker and suggest before posting your practice details you should have thought what the public of Bolton would think. "THEY CANT LOOK AFTER THEIR OWN DOG,I'M CERTAINLY NOT TRUSTING THEM WITH MINE" Like i said stupid and arrogant. omylord
  • Score: 0

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