Lecturers go on strike at Bolton College and the University of Bolton over pay dispute

The Bolton News: Staff picketing at Bolton College today Staff picketing at Bolton College today

HIGHER education staff across Bolton went on strike to protest about a pay deal which they say leaves them significantly out of pocket.

Members of the University and College Union (UCU) from Bolton College and the University of Bolton picketed outside the main entrances of their buildings as part of a day of industrial action.

The union is angry staff were only offered a one per cent pay rise this year.

Lecturers in further education colleges in England have rejected a pay offer of 0.7 per cent from their national employers, the Association of Colleges (AoC).

They say the offer is the equivalent of a pay cut.

Joan Bailey, chairman of the Bolton branch of UCU representing further education staff, was campaigning outside Bolton College and calling on the AoC to offer a seven per cent pay rise.

The teacher, who has worked for 23 years, said: “We just want a fair deal, and striking is not something that we have taken lightly.

“We care passionately for our students and work tirelessly towards educating the people of Bolton but we feel we have to make a stand.”

Marie Guilluley, Principal of Bolton College, said while she sympathises with the UCU members, increasing the pay offer would present the organisation with a significant budgetary challenge against a reduction in college funding.

She added: “For the most part, classes ran as normal with relatively few being cancelled. The college apologises to those affected learners for any inconvenience the cancellations may have caused.”

Pro Vice Chancellor of the University of Bolton, Professor Rob Campbell, said there was no significant disruption to classes as a result of action.

He added: “The university has done everything it can to minimise the impact of any action on students.

“We cannot give exact numbers but we have good reason to believe that less than ten per cent of staff have taken part in today’s action.”

University students largely supported the strike.

Caitlin Lloyd, aged 19, said: “I think going on strike and cancelling classes, especially around this time a year, isn’t good, but if they have losing out then it’s what they’ve got to do.”

“I completely agree with the strike”, said second-year university student Matthew Atherden.

The 19-year-old added: “I work for B&Q, and this year we got a four per cent pay rise.”

Comments (18)

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11:02am Tue 3 Dec 13

steveG says...

Is the pay structure at Bolton college performance related?.
Is the pay structure at Bolton college performance related?. steveG

11:34am Tue 3 Dec 13

boltonchap says...

steveG wrote:
Is the pay structure at Bolton college performance related?.
Not sure but if performance related pay is used at Bolton University then the staff there owe the taxpayer and their students an awful lot of money.
[quote][p][bold]steveG[/bold] wrote: Is the pay structure at Bolton college performance related?.[/p][/quote]Not sure but if performance related pay is used at Bolton University then the staff there owe the taxpayer and their students an awful lot of money. boltonchap

11:57am Tue 3 Dec 13

thomas222 says...

B and Q Isnt public money.
B and Q Isnt public money. thomas222

11:59am Tue 3 Dec 13

thomas222 says...

Anyone know their current salary and wouldnt you think the reporter would have found this out and added it to the artricle?
Anyone know their current salary and wouldnt you think the reporter would have found this out and added it to the artricle? thomas222

12:18pm Tue 3 Dec 13

boltonchap says...

Why was my comment deleted moderator?
Why was my comment deleted moderator? boltonchap

12:19pm Tue 3 Dec 13

boltonchap says...

boltonchap wrote:
Why was my comment deleted moderator?
Now it's back. Strange.
[quote][p][bold]boltonchap[/bold] wrote: Why was my comment deleted moderator?[/p][/quote]Now it's back. Strange. boltonchap

1:24pm Tue 3 Dec 13

fisherman1959 says...

Think yourselves lucky to have a job. There are a lo of people would jump for joy if they had your jobs.
Think yourselves lucky to have a job. There are a lo of people would jump for joy if they had your jobs. fisherman1959

1:53pm Tue 3 Dec 13

filthy6 says...

fisherman1959 wrote:
Think yourselves lucky to have a job. There are a lo of people would jump for joy if they had your jobs.
Are there loads of qualified lecturers signing on in Bolton at the moment?
[quote][p][bold]fisherman1959[/bold] wrote: Think yourselves lucky to have a job. There are a lo of people would jump for joy if they had your jobs.[/p][/quote]Are there loads of qualified lecturers signing on in Bolton at the moment? filthy6

2:09pm Tue 3 Dec 13

Wolfie190 says...

Those colleges are just a front for sneaking third world cheap labour in by the back door, when you drive past how many English people do you see there and how many go back where they belong after their courses ?
Those colleges are just a front for sneaking third world cheap labour in by the back door, when you drive past how many English people do you see there and how many go back where they belong after their courses ? Wolfie190

3:19pm Tue 3 Dec 13

filthy6 says...

Wolfie190 wrote:
Those colleges are just a front for sneaking third world cheap labour in by the back door, when you drive past how many English people do you see there and how many go back where they belong after their courses ?
Our according to figures from The Complete University Guide - the percentage of international students at Bolton was 9.6%.

But why let facts get in the way of a rent eh...!
[quote][p][bold]Wolfie190[/bold] wrote: Those colleges are just a front for sneaking third world cheap labour in by the back door, when you drive past how many English people do you see there and how many go back where they belong after their courses ?[/p][/quote]Our according to figures from The Complete University Guide - the percentage of international students at Bolton was 9.6%. But why let facts get in the way of a rent eh...! filthy6

3:51pm Tue 3 Dec 13

thomas222 says...

filthy6 wrote:
Wolfie190 wrote: Those colleges are just a front for sneaking third world cheap labour in by the back door, when you drive past how many English people do you see there and how many go back where they belong after their courses ?
Our according to figures from The Complete University Guide - the percentage of international students at Bolton was 9.6%. But why let facts get in the way of a rent eh...!
Never!
[quote][p][bold]filthy6[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Wolfie190[/bold] wrote: Those colleges are just a front for sneaking third world cheap labour in by the back door, when you drive past how many English people do you see there and how many go back where they belong after their courses ?[/p][/quote]Our according to figures from The Complete University Guide - the percentage of international students at Bolton was 9.6%. But why let facts get in the way of a rent eh...![/p][/quote]Never! thomas222

4:10pm Tue 3 Dec 13

fay clarke says...

How can they have the bare faced cheek to ask for a pay raise when some people cannot even find work and others do not get a regular pay raise. Sack them and bring in people that want to work and not neglect their students.
How can they have the bare faced cheek to ask for a pay raise when some people cannot even find work and others do not get a regular pay raise. Sack them and bring in people that want to work and not neglect their students. fay clarke

4:24pm Tue 3 Dec 13

filthy6 says...

fay clarke wrote:
How can they have the bare faced cheek to ask for a pay raise when some people cannot even find work and others do not get a regular pay raise. Sack them and bring in people that want to work and not neglect their students.
I was going to respond but just can't be bothered. It would take too long to....
[quote][p][bold]fay clarke[/bold] wrote: How can they have the bare faced cheek to ask for a pay raise when some people cannot even find work and others do not get a regular pay raise. Sack them and bring in people that want to work and not neglect their students.[/p][/quote]I was going to respond but just can't be bothered. It would take too long to.... filthy6

5:04pm Tue 3 Dec 13

StGibbs says...

thomas222 wrote:
Anyone know their current salary and wouldnt you think the reporter would have found this out and added it to the artricle?
it's been reported on before...
from memory VC... over £200,000
a lot ot of the striking workers... around a tenth of that.

Does that answer you?
[quote][p][bold]thomas222[/bold] wrote: Anyone know their current salary and wouldnt you think the reporter would have found this out and added it to the artricle?[/p][/quote]it's been reported on before... from memory VC... over £200,000 a lot ot of the striking workers... around a tenth of that. Does that answer you? StGibbs

6:11pm Tue 3 Dec 13

hazdbfs says...

Many of the lecturers are on around 20 grand a year...some less, as most positions available are only part-time, meaning they have to supplement their income by working other jobs. So if you think that they have spent years at college training to be a teacher, getting into debt with student loans to fund their study, then this figure isn't all that fantastic. Especially when many people on benefits get this figure for doing nothing. Also, many lecturers are paid term time only, so the myths about all these holidays they get are totally unfounded too. True, they should be glad they have a job, but you could say that about ANYONE in a job. I'm quite sure that we don't all go running and skipping into work every single day, happy that we have a job, and don't complain about anything at all.
Many of the lecturers are on around 20 grand a year...some less, as most positions available are only part-time, meaning they have to supplement their income by working other jobs. So if you think that they have spent years at college training to be a teacher, getting into debt with student loans to fund their study, then this figure isn't all that fantastic. Especially when many people on benefits get this figure for doing nothing. Also, many lecturers are paid term time only, so the myths about all these holidays they get are totally unfounded too. True, they should be glad they have a job, but you could say that about ANYONE in a job. I'm quite sure that we don't all go running and skipping into work every single day, happy that we have a job, and don't complain about anything at all. hazdbfs

9:34pm Tue 3 Dec 13

Citizen Cane says...

...well benefit recipients shouldn't be getting 20 grand a year should they? And 20 grand a year for lecturing how many days? At that level, they'll be getting in work benefits won't they - if they have children?
...well benefit recipients shouldn't be getting 20 grand a year should they? And 20 grand a year for lecturing how many days? At that level, they'll be getting in work benefits won't they - if they have children? Citizen Cane

5:32pm Wed 4 Dec 13

atlas123 says...

It always amuses me when people go on strike over pay.


My grandad told me this many moons ago when somone was striking over a half a percent.

Assuming they work 5 in 7, or at least get paid on that then each day they strike they lose 0.4% pay that year.


Of course they often strike and want back pay and of course the rise is compounded year on year and rise on rise, but still the fact remains.

Yes I am very anti strike and very, here's the job, here's the compensation for your trouble (ie the pay) of you dont like it or the grass is greener then there is the door. Yes i have done it both ways as an employer i have refused a pay rise, shaken the employees hand written them a reference and wished them all the best, and I have left jobs when I have thought the pay/work balance didn't stack up. I would class myself as semi-skilled.

The only strike i can really remember supporting was that railway station master who went on the track to save someone and was fired for breaching company policy. As a result the rest of his union came out on strike and fair play to them all for losing a days wage for sake of the right thing.
It always amuses me when people go on strike over pay. My grandad told me this many moons ago when somone was striking over a half a percent. Assuming they work 5 in 7, or at least get paid on that then each day they strike they lose 0.4% pay that year. Of course they often strike and want back pay and of course the rise is compounded year on year and rise on rise, but still the fact remains. Yes I am very anti strike and very, here's the job, here's the compensation for your trouble (ie the pay) of you dont like it or the grass is greener then there is the door. Yes i have done it both ways as an employer i have refused a pay rise, shaken the employees hand written them a reference and wished them all the best, and I have left jobs when I have thought the pay/work balance didn't stack up. I would class myself as semi-skilled. The only strike i can really remember supporting was that railway station master who went on the track to save someone and was fired for breaching company policy. As a result the rest of his union came out on strike and fair play to them all for losing a days wage for sake of the right thing. atlas123

4:27pm Thu 5 Dec 13

hazdbfs says...

Citizen Cane.., you have obviously no idea what you are talking about. In work benefits? What makes you think all the lecturers have families? I am presuming you mean working tax credits by in work benefits. Contrary to your deluded belief, there is a cut off point for the level you are allowed to earn which will entitle you to that. As for your question as to how many days they work for that money? Five days. And that is if they are lucky enough to get a full time contract. Many are agency employed staff who only get paid for their time in the classroom, and not the time spent planning, marking, and other duties. So maybe you should research before you jump on your stereotypical bandwagon.
Citizen Cane.., you have obviously no idea what you are talking about. In work benefits? What makes you think all the lecturers have families? I am presuming you mean working tax credits by in work benefits. Contrary to your deluded belief, there is a cut off point for the level you are allowed to earn which will entitle you to that. As for your question as to how many days they work for that money? Five days. And that is if they are lucky enough to get a full time contract. Many are agency employed staff who only get paid for their time in the classroom, and not the time spent planning, marking, and other duties. So maybe you should research before you jump on your stereotypical bandwagon. hazdbfs

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