Hospital doctors to be available seven days in bid to tackle higher weekend death rates

The Bolton News: Dr Wirin Bhatiani Dr Wirin Bhatiani

HEALTH chiefs in Bolton have welcomed plans to ensure senior doctors are available seven days per week in hospitals.

The measures form part of a vision unveiled by NHS England to tackle higher death rates at weekends.

The changes, proposed by medical director Professor Bruce Keogh, will be applied to urgent and emergency services over the next three years.

Research suggests death rates are 16 per cent higher for patients with emergency conditions admitted on Sundays compared with those admitted on Wednesdays.

Prof Keogh says access to diagnostic tests also needs to be improved at weekends — a step Royal Bolton chiefs say they have already taken.

Steve Hodgson, acting medical director, said: “I welcome Bruce Keogh’s recommendations and indeed this trust has already been working towards them as we believe they are in the best interests of patients.

“For instance we already have weekend access to many diagnostic tests such as X-rays, CT scans and blood tests. We also have a wide range of consultants on site at weekends especially those who may be needed in an emergency.

“We do understand the importance of delivering safe and reliable care across the week and are continuing to work to increase seven day working.”

Dr Wirin Bhatiani, pictured, chairman of NHS Bolton Clinical Commissioning Group, said: “There is clear evidence that 24/7 consultant cover is safer for patients who need particular types of urgent surgery.

"As part of Healthier Together, NHS Bolton Clinical Commissioning Group is working with other CCGs in Greater Manchester to look at how this can be achieved.

“We want all patients to have the best possible outcomes regardless of the day of the week. The CCG will keep talking to Bolton people about any proposed changes to service provision in Bolton.”

Cllr Andy Morgan, who sits on the health scrutiny committee, welcomed Prof Keogh’s plans.

He said: “This is exactly what patients need.

“Hospitals should have the same level of staff cover and care at the weekend.”

Comments (3)

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8:50am Tue 17 Dec 13

oftbewildered2 says...

not just for A&E either - hospital in-patients often have to stay in hospital because the consultant is not available and junior doctors prefer to wait until the boss is consulted (in some cases this is). My father died on a Sunday - two on call doctors had failed to diagnose bilateral pulmonary emboli and told him to see his GP on the following Monday. Things have improved in that direction since then - but I can never forget my feeling that he was let down.
not just for A&E either - hospital in-patients often have to stay in hospital because the consultant is not available and junior doctors prefer to wait until the boss is consulted (in some cases this is). My father died on a Sunday - two on call doctors had failed to diagnose bilateral pulmonary emboli and told him to see his GP on the following Monday. Things have improved in that direction since then - but I can never forget my feeling that he was let down. oftbewildered2

3:18pm Fri 27 Dec 13

Puffin-Billy says...

Why is Councillor Andy Morgan on the Health Scrutiny committee?
It is his party which is deliberately putting the NHS under strain in order to privatise the lot.

He may just be interested in this article by a GP (if he cares about the NHS)





"It's been an amazing privilege working as a family doctor. I am trusted with the long-term care and health of sometimes four generations, and I have tried to help with their most intimate and complex problems, sometimes shared only with me. It's the best job in medicine, and the NHS was the best place to practice.

So why am I retiring early? Because for several years I've fought the dismantling of the founding principles of Bevan's NHS and on 1 April I lost. That was the day the main provisions of the Health and Social Care Act 2012 came into effect. On Wednesday night, a last-gasp attempt in the House of Lords to annul the part pushing competitive tendering sadly failed.

The democratic and legal basis of the English NHS and the secretary of state's duty to provide comprehensive health services have now gone, and the framework that allows for wholesale privatisation of the planning, organisation, supply, finance and distribution of our health care is now in place. Since 1948, we GPs have been our patient's advocate, championing the care we judge is needed clinically.

Everyone necessary for that care co-operated for the good of the patient – they didn't compete for the benefit of shareholders. Sadly, patients are now right to be suspicious of motives concerning decisions made about them, which until recently, almost uniquely in the world, have been purely in their best clinical interest. Most politicians understand little about general practice, have no idea about the importance of continuity of care and blame GPs for a rise in hospital work, even though this is a direct result of their policies.

I believe patient choice is an illusion as I am restricted in terms of where I can refer and what treatments I can use. GPs are now expected to collude with rationing, are sent incomprehensible financial spreadsheets telling us our "activity levels" are too high and in some areas are prevented from speaking out about this, despite the government's weasel words about duty of candour after Mid Staffs. Practices are already being solicited by private companies touting for business, often connected to members of my own profession. But the lie that GPs are now in control of the money will soon be exposed. Most services are to go out to tender, which will paralyse decision-making.

Now your doctor, the hospital, your specialist or the employing company has a financial incentive built into the clinical decision-making – even whether or not you are seen at all. Your referral may be to a related company, with both profiting from your care – so was that operation, procedure or investigation really in your best clinical interest? Or you may be told a service is now no longer available. The jargon used is that "we are not commissioned for that". But you can pay. The elephant in the consulting room is the ethical implication of private medicine. In my 30 years as an NHS GP, some of the most disastrously treated patients are those who elected for private care. Decisions were made about them for the wrong reasons, namely profit. Patients are rarely aware of this.

The politicians who drive this unnecessary revolution claim the NHS is not being privatised because it is still free at the point of use. This is duplicitous as the two are not connected. They are ignorant or dismissive of the founding principles of the NHS which include it being universal and comprehensive – both of which have gone. The NHS logo appears on all sorts of private company buildings and notepaper which is one reason patients haven't noticed the change yet. Just leaving "free at the point of use" under an NHS kitemark doesn't constitute a national health service. It's now one small step to insurance companies picking up the bill (but obviously profiting from it) rather than the state. An Americanised system run by many US companies. The end of a "60-year-old mistake", as Jeremy Hunt once co-authored.

I am proud to have been an NHS GP. I believe the way a society delivers its healthcare defines the values and nature of that society. In the US, healthcare is not primarily about looking after the nation's health but a huge multi-company, money-making machine which makes some people extremely rich but neglects millions of its citizens. We are being dragged into that machine and I want no part in it.

The politicians responsible for this must live with their consciences, as it is the greatest failure of democracy in my lifetime."
Why is Councillor Andy Morgan on the Health Scrutiny committee? It is his party which is deliberately putting the NHS under strain in order to privatise the lot. He may just be interested in this article by a GP (if he cares about the NHS) "It's been an amazing privilege working as a family doctor. I am trusted with the long-term care and health of sometimes four generations, and I have tried to help with their most intimate and complex problems, sometimes shared only with me. It's the best job in medicine, and the NHS was the best place to practice. So why am I retiring early? Because for several years I've fought the dismantling of the founding principles of Bevan's NHS and on 1 April I lost. That was the day the main provisions of the Health and Social Care Act 2012 came into effect. On Wednesday night, a last-gasp attempt in the House of Lords to annul the part pushing competitive tendering sadly failed. The democratic and legal basis of the English NHS and the secretary of state's duty to provide comprehensive health services have now gone, and the framework that allows for wholesale privatisation of the planning, organisation, supply, finance and distribution of our health care is now in place. Since 1948, we GPs have been our patient's advocate, championing the care we judge is needed clinically. Everyone necessary for that care co-operated for the good of the patient – they didn't compete for the benefit of shareholders. Sadly, patients are now right to be suspicious of motives concerning decisions made about them, which until recently, almost uniquely in the world, have been purely in their best clinical interest. Most politicians understand little about general practice, have no idea about the importance of continuity of care and blame GPs for a rise in hospital work, even though this is a direct result of their policies. I believe patient choice is an illusion as I am restricted in terms of where I can refer and what treatments I can use. GPs are now expected to collude with rationing, are sent incomprehensible financial spreadsheets telling us our "activity levels" are too high and in some areas are prevented from speaking out about this, despite the government's weasel words about duty of candour after Mid Staffs. Practices are already being solicited by private companies touting for business, often connected to members of my own profession. But the lie that GPs are now in control of the money will soon be exposed. Most services are to go out to tender, which will paralyse decision-making. Now your doctor, the hospital, your specialist or the employing company has a financial incentive built into the clinical decision-making – even whether or not you are seen at all. Your referral may be to a related company, with both profiting from your care – so was that operation, procedure or investigation really in your best clinical interest? Or you may be told a service is now no longer available. The jargon used is that "we are not commissioned for that". But you can pay. The elephant in the consulting room is the ethical implication of private medicine. In my 30 years as an NHS GP, some of the most disastrously treated patients are those who elected for private care. Decisions were made about them for the wrong reasons, namely profit. Patients are rarely aware of this. The politicians who drive this unnecessary revolution claim the NHS is not being privatised because it is still free at the point of use. This is duplicitous as the two are not connected. They are ignorant or dismissive of the founding principles of the NHS which include it being universal and comprehensive – both of which have gone. The NHS logo appears on all sorts of private company buildings and notepaper which is one reason patients haven't noticed the change yet. Just leaving "free at the point of use" under an NHS kitemark doesn't constitute a national health service. It's now one small step to insurance companies picking up the bill (but obviously profiting from it) rather than the state. An Americanised system run by many US companies. The end of a "60-year-old mistake", as Jeremy Hunt once co-authored. I am proud to have been an NHS GP. I believe the way a society delivers its healthcare defines the values and nature of that society. In the US, healthcare is not primarily about looking after the nation's health but a huge multi-company, money-making machine which makes some people extremely rich but neglects millions of its citizens. We are being dragged into that machine and I want no part in it. The politicians responsible for this must live with their consciences, as it is the greatest failure of democracy in my lifetime." Puffin-Billy

3:22pm Fri 27 Dec 13

Puffin-Billy says...

Why is Councillor Andy Morgan, or any Conservative Party supporter on the Health Scrutiny Committee?
If he cares about the NHS he will fight for it and oppose the disastrous cuts imposed on it by his party.

Maybe, if he really cares about the NHS, he will be interested in this article by a GP

It's been an amazing privilege working as a family doctor. I am trusted with the long-term care and health of sometimes four generations, and I have tried to help with their most intimate and complex problems, sometimes shared only with me. It's the best job in medicine, and the NHS was the best place to practice.

So why am I retiring early? Because for several years I've fought the dismantling of the founding principles of Bevan's NHS and on 1 April I lost. That was the day the main provisions of the Health and Social Care Act 2012 came into effect. On Wednesday night, a last-gasp attempt in the House of Lords to annul the part pushing competitive tendering sadly failed.

The democratic and legal basis of the English NHS and the secretary of state's duty to provide comprehensive health services have now gone, and the framework that allows for wholesale privatisation of the planning, organisation, supply, finance and distribution of our health care is now in place. Since 1948, we GPs have been our patient's advocate, championing the care we judge is needed clinically.

Everyone necessary for that care co-operated for the good of the patient – they didn't compete for the benefit of shareholders. Sadly, patients are now right to be suspicious of motives concerning decisions made about them, which until recently, almost uniquely in the world, have been purely in their best clinical interest. Most politicians understand little about general practice, have no idea about the importance of continuity of care and blame GPs for a rise in hospital work, even though this is a direct result of their policies.

I believe patient choice is an illusion as I am restricted in terms of where I can refer and what treatments I can use. GPs are now expected to collude with rationing, are sent incomprehensible financial spreadsheets telling us our "activity levels" are too high and in some areas are prevented from speaking out about this, despite the government's weasel words about duty of candour after Mid Staffs. Practices are already being solicited by private companies touting for business, often connected to members of my own profession. But the lie that GPs are now in control of the money will soon be exposed. Most services are to go out to tender, which will paralyse decision-making.

Now your doctor, the hospital, your specialist or the employing company has a financial incentive built into the clinical decision-making – even whether or not you are seen at all. Your referral may be to a related company, with both profiting from your care – so was that operation, procedure or investigation really in your best clinical interest? Or you may be told a service is now no longer available. The jargon used is that "we are not commissioned for that". But you can pay. The elephant in the consulting room is the ethical implication of private medicine. In my 30 years as an NHS GP, some of the most disastrously treated patients are those who elected for private care. Decisions were made about them for the wrong reasons, namely profit. Patients are rarely aware of this.

The politicians who drive this unnecessary revolution claim the NHS is not being privatised because it is still free at the point of use. This is duplicitous as the two are not connected. They are ignorant or dismissive of the founding principles of the NHS which include it being universal and comprehensive – both of which have gone. The NHS logo appears on all sorts of private company buildings and notepaper which is one reason patients haven't noticed the change yet. Just leaving "free at the point of use" under an NHS kitemark doesn't constitute a national health service. It's now one small step to insurance companies picking up the bill (but obviously profiting from it) rather than the state. An Americanised system run by many US companies. The end of a "60-year-old mistake", as Jeremy Hunt once co-authored.

I am proud to have been an NHS GP. I believe the way a society delivers its healthcare defines the values and nature of that society. In the US, healthcare is not primarily about looking after the nation's health but a huge multi-company, money-making machine which makes some people extremely rich but neglects millions of its citizens. We are being dragged into that machine and I want no part in it.

The politicians responsible for this must live with their consciences, as it is the greatest failure of democracy in my lifetime.
Why is Councillor Andy Morgan, or any Conservative Party supporter on the Health Scrutiny Committee? If he cares about the NHS he will fight for it and oppose the disastrous cuts imposed on it by his party. Maybe, if he really cares about the NHS, he will be interested in this article by a GP It's been an amazing privilege working as a family doctor. I am trusted with the long-term care and health of sometimes four generations, and I have tried to help with their most intimate and complex problems, sometimes shared only with me. It's the best job in medicine, and the NHS was the best place to practice. So why am I retiring early? Because for several years I've fought the dismantling of the founding principles of Bevan's NHS and on 1 April I lost. That was the day the main provisions of the Health and Social Care Act 2012 came into effect. On Wednesday night, a last-gasp attempt in the House of Lords to annul the part pushing competitive tendering sadly failed. The democratic and legal basis of the English NHS and the secretary of state's duty to provide comprehensive health services have now gone, and the framework that allows for wholesale privatisation of the planning, organisation, supply, finance and distribution of our health care is now in place. Since 1948, we GPs have been our patient's advocate, championing the care we judge is needed clinically. Everyone necessary for that care co-operated for the good of the patient – they didn't compete for the benefit of shareholders. Sadly, patients are now right to be suspicious of motives concerning decisions made about them, which until recently, almost uniquely in the world, have been purely in their best clinical interest. Most politicians understand little about general practice, have no idea about the importance of continuity of care and blame GPs for a rise in hospital work, even though this is a direct result of their policies. I believe patient choice is an illusion as I am restricted in terms of where I can refer and what treatments I can use. GPs are now expected to collude with rationing, are sent incomprehensible financial spreadsheets telling us our "activity levels" are too high and in some areas are prevented from speaking out about this, despite the government's weasel words about duty of candour after Mid Staffs. Practices are already being solicited by private companies touting for business, often connected to members of my own profession. But the lie that GPs are now in control of the money will soon be exposed. Most services are to go out to tender, which will paralyse decision-making. Now your doctor, the hospital, your specialist or the employing company has a financial incentive built into the clinical decision-making – even whether or not you are seen at all. Your referral may be to a related company, with both profiting from your care – so was that operation, procedure or investigation really in your best clinical interest? Or you may be told a service is now no longer available. The jargon used is that "we are not commissioned for that". But you can pay. The elephant in the consulting room is the ethical implication of private medicine. In my 30 years as an NHS GP, some of the most disastrously treated patients are those who elected for private care. Decisions were made about them for the wrong reasons, namely profit. Patients are rarely aware of this. The politicians who drive this unnecessary revolution claim the NHS is not being privatised because it is still free at the point of use. This is duplicitous as the two are not connected. They are ignorant or dismissive of the founding principles of the NHS which include it being universal and comprehensive – both of which have gone. The NHS logo appears on all sorts of private company buildings and notepaper which is one reason patients haven't noticed the change yet. Just leaving "free at the point of use" under an NHS kitemark doesn't constitute a national health service. It's now one small step to insurance companies picking up the bill (but obviously profiting from it) rather than the state. An Americanised system run by many US companies. The end of a "60-year-old mistake", as Jeremy Hunt once co-authored. I am proud to have been an NHS GP. I believe the way a society delivers its healthcare defines the values and nature of that society. In the US, healthcare is not primarily about looking after the nation's health but a huge multi-company, money-making machine which makes some people extremely rich but neglects millions of its citizens. We are being dragged into that machine and I want no part in it. The politicians responsible for this must live with their consciences, as it is the greatest failure of democracy in my lifetime. Puffin-Billy

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