Mum’s dispute over her autistic son’s schooling

The Bolton News: Monique and Matthew Blakemore Monique and Matthew Blakemore

A CHILD with acute autism has been in school for only 18 months of the past four years because his educational needs “are not being met”, according to his mother.

Bolton Council has organised a place for Matthew Blakemore at a special school in Ormskirk which has just a few places — but his mother feels even this would be too much for him.

The eight-year-old has now been to four different schools in the region after moving to Farnworth from Australia.

He suffers from Sensory Processing Disorder, which means he struggles to react to sensations and crowds.

Three placements organised for Matthew by Bolton Council have broken down — one at a school for autistic children — and an educational tribunal ruled in his favour in 2011.

The tribunal has left the council obliged to provide an education for Matthew, which includes 73 hours a year of speech and language therapy, and 87 hours of occupational therapy.

But, Matthew has not been in school since March when a placement at the Grange School in Manchester broke down because his mother Monique Blakemore said he was restrained when he reacted badly to other children.

Now she says she want to highlight the injustices facing autistic children in Bolton.

Mrs Blakemore and her husband Chris have been offered places for Matthew and his older brother, Nicholas, aged nine, who suffers from a different type of autism and currently attends St Theresa’s Primary, at Pontville School in Ormskirk — a 55-minute drive from the family’s home.

Mrs Blakemore said: “We think that home tutoring, for the next few months, is the only viable way forward but Bolton Council say this is not possible, despite the tribunal’s ruling.”

Matthew initially went to Bowness Primary, but left in 2011 as the school could not deal with a child with his problems. After a nine-month absence from school, he then briefly attended Ladywood Special School, but Mrs Blakemore said the class sizes of 20 to 25 children were too much for Matthew.

In September last year, Matthew then moved to The Grange, in Gorton. She claims there were reports of teachers restraining him there, so Mrs Blakemore withdrew him.

A Bolton Council spokesman said: “We would not comment on individual circumstances but our special educational needs department works very closely with all parents to obtain the most appropriate school for their child.

“We endeavour to listen to any concerns that parents may have and work with our partners to arrange the most suitable support available.”

Comments (71)

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9:53am Mon 30 Dec 13

oftbewildered2 says...

whilst I sympathise and applaud this mother's fight for her children, it is unfortunate that there is not always a custom built system available for each individual with special needs. Obviously a lot of meeting of minds needs to take place to come up with the best available option.
whilst I sympathise and applaud this mother's fight for her children, it is unfortunate that there is not always a custom built system available for each individual with special needs. Obviously a lot of meeting of minds needs to take place to come up with the best available option. oftbewildered2

1:43pm Mon 30 Dec 13

atlas123 says...

There is of course a balancing act that needs to take place between the needs of this child and the costs to the public purse along with cost/benefit analysis.

The costs of home tutoring one child could make a dramatic difference to the schooling of many children at a school.

Hard but true. Simple economics.
There is of course a balancing act that needs to take place between the needs of this child and the costs to the public purse along with cost/benefit analysis. The costs of home tutoring one child could make a dramatic difference to the schooling of many children at a school. Hard but true. Simple economics. atlas123

3:56pm Mon 30 Dec 13

mr.mark.c says...

Teachers have a duty to protect the children so restraining him would be common practice if he was being violent.
I dont know what this lady has done it total but a referal to CAMHS would help as they will push for more help.
How about the NAS ?
And also the school is within its rights to give her work packs for home that are taken to the school to be marked.
Teachers have a duty to protect the children so restraining him would be common practice if he was being violent. I dont know what this lady has done it total but a referal to CAMHS would help as they will push for more help. How about the NAS ? And also the school is within its rights to give her work packs for home that are taken to the school to be marked. mr.mark.c

4:20pm Mon 30 Dec 13

Aspie-Ambassador says...

Please stay strong and don't allow your children to go to any educational setting without checking whether they understand sensory processing differences, since special school staff are not legally obliged to be ASD qualified to an accredited standard, and often their best qualifications are in positive handling which is another term for restraints. If a school is not able to recognise sensory signals and doesnot make reasonable accommodations or seek the underlying reasons for behaviour, it is very unlikely to understand how to de escalate situations and this leads to over reliance on restraints for compliance rather than engaging pupils. Obviously this is just an example since I would not write anything which could be seen as libellous or malicious in any way, but offer such examples as criteria parents could consider when looking at a setting to support their child's needs etc. If there is a good reason to keep your child at home then the LA should provide for your child, especially if he has a SEN. You need to look into the option called Education Otherwise, and you also probably could do with legal advice, since local authority is very resistant to recognising their duties in this area.

I have a lot of info about the issues in this article and if the person in this article is interested in discussing these issues further then please reply to this comment.
Please stay strong and don't allow your children to go to any educational setting without checking whether they understand sensory processing differences, since special school staff are not legally obliged to be ASD qualified to an accredited standard, and often their best qualifications are in positive handling which is another term for restraints. If a school is not able to recognise sensory signals and doesnot make reasonable accommodations or seek the underlying reasons for behaviour, it is very unlikely to understand how to de escalate situations and this leads to over reliance on restraints for compliance rather than engaging pupils. Obviously this is just an example since I would not write anything which could be seen as libellous or malicious in any way, but offer such examples as criteria parents could consider when looking at a setting to support their child's needs etc. If there is a good reason to keep your child at home then the LA should provide for your child, especially if he has a SEN. You need to look into the option called Education Otherwise, and you also probably could do with legal advice, since local authority is very resistant to recognising their duties in this area. I have a lot of info about the issues in this article and if the person in this article is interested in discussing these issues further then please reply to this comment. Aspie-Ambassador

4:28pm Mon 30 Dec 13

Aspie-Ambassador says...

There is research that shows Restraints in special school are much higher than in other schools, which implies that inappropriate and excessive force is used and that de escalation is not understood or applied. There is a restraints culture and autistic children are especially vulnerable to this kind of abuse from staff, which is easily masked by assumptions of behaviour etc. the LADO and other professionals who are not ASD trained fail these children regrettably.
There is research that shows Restraints in special school are much higher than in other schools, which implies that inappropriate and excessive force is used and that de escalation is not understood or applied. There is a restraints culture and autistic children are especially vulnerable to this kind of abuse from staff, which is easily masked by assumptions of behaviour etc. the LADO and other professionals who are not ASD trained fail these children regrettably. Aspie-Ambassador

6:23pm Mon 30 Dec 13

Aspie-Ambassador says...

oftbewildered2 wrote:
whilst I sympathise and applaud this mother's fight for her children, it is unfortunate that there is not always a custom built system available for each individual with special needs. Obviously a lot of meeting of minds needs to take place to come up with the best available option.
Actually atlas123 children with an sen bring a lot of extra money into state maintained schools, which is then used on the whole school rather than on the child, to the child's detriment and this has an adverse effect on the child's behaviour. These same children who are welcomed in Autumn term for the funds they bring are often condemned and excluded by Christmas or by the end of the academic year.
[quote][p][bold]oftbewildered2[/bold] wrote: whilst I sympathise and applaud this mother's fight for her children, it is unfortunate that there is not always a custom built system available for each individual with special needs. Obviously a lot of meeting of minds needs to take place to come up with the best available option.[/p][/quote]Actually atlas123 children with an sen bring a lot of extra money into state maintained schools, which is then used on the whole school rather than on the child, to the child's detriment and this has an adverse effect on the child's behaviour. These same children who are welcomed in Autumn term for the funds they bring are often condemned and excluded by Christmas or by the end of the academic year. Aspie-Ambassador

10:22pm Mon 30 Dec 13

Aspie-Ambassador says...

Oh and stat guidelines state that primary age children should not travel further than 45 mins to attend school, I hope ms Blakemore realises she has a lot of strong arguments in her favour, good luck to the family
Oh and stat guidelines state that primary age children should not travel further than 45 mins to attend school, I hope ms Blakemore realises she has a lot of strong arguments in her favour, good luck to the family Aspie-Ambassador

1:13am Tue 31 Dec 13

Owl sentinel says...

I know of several families. whose sons have had a very difficult time at a special school which is based in Ormskirk and supposedly outstanding. The child became very distressed, due to the amounts restraints he received, which caused his behaviour to become worse. It is widely acknowledged that restraints are not safe, but its justified in "emergencies" however, the same people fail to see that if such emergencies are the norm then their interventions or plans or due escalation obviously isn't working!
I know of several families. whose sons have had a very difficult time at a special school which is based in Ormskirk and supposedly outstanding. The child became very distressed, due to the amounts restraints he received, which caused his behaviour to become worse. It is widely acknowledged that restraints are not safe, but its justified in "emergencies" however, the same people fail to see that if such emergencies are the norm then their interventions or plans or due escalation obviously isn't working! Owl sentinel

1:22am Tue 31 Dec 13

Owl sentinel says...

ASD is barely understood by teachers and ed psychologists and CAMHS (who are not independent but LA specialist providers). Sensory Processing Disorder is even less understood. Even settings with sensory suites and OT's don't really know how to implement strategies effectively. Schools which say they do are lying, as there would be evidence of this in their playgrounds, classrooms, lunch-halls, etc. beneath the hype of schools which claim to specialise in certain areas such as ASD which has a huge sensory component.
ASD is barely understood by teachers and ed psychologists and CAMHS (who are not independent but LA specialist providers). Sensory Processing Disorder is even less understood. Even settings with sensory suites and OT's don't really know how to implement strategies effectively. Schools which say they do are lying, as there would be evidence of this in their playgrounds, classrooms, lunch-halls, etc. beneath the hype of schools which claim to specialise in certain areas such as ASD which has a huge sensory component. Owl sentinel

12:04pm Tue 31 Dec 13

atlas123 says...

Aspie-Ambassador wrote:
oftbewildered2 wrote:
whilst I sympathise and applaud this mother's fight for her children, it is unfortunate that there is not always a custom built system available for each individual with special needs. Obviously a lot of meeting of minds needs to take place to come up with the best available option.
Actually atlas123 children with an sen bring a lot of extra money into state maintained schools, which is then used on the whole school rather than on the child, to the child's detriment and this has an adverse effect on the child's behaviour. These same children who are welcomed in Autumn term for the funds they bring are often condemned and excluded by Christmas or by the end of the academic year.
But this child is not.... The money is being diverted away from the masses...

Whilst I agree that he should be afforded speech therapy at the states expense the parents do have a responsibility to get him there.


I do not agree that huge ammounts of money should be spent on children who are not going to benifit, or that the money could brin greater returns elswhere.

The country has to spend smarter, on people, projects and infrastructure that will give a good return.

Socialism simply does not work to the nth degree.
[quote][p][bold]Aspie-Ambassador[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]oftbewildered2[/bold] wrote: whilst I sympathise and applaud this mother's fight for her children, it is unfortunate that there is not always a custom built system available for each individual with special needs. Obviously a lot of meeting of minds needs to take place to come up with the best available option.[/p][/quote]Actually atlas123 children with an sen bring a lot of extra money into state maintained schools, which is then used on the whole school rather than on the child, to the child's detriment and this has an adverse effect on the child's behaviour. These same children who are welcomed in Autumn term for the funds they bring are often condemned and excluded by Christmas or by the end of the academic year.[/p][/quote]But this child is not.... The money is being diverted away from the masses... Whilst I agree that he should be afforded speech therapy at the states expense the parents do have a responsibility to get him there. I do not agree that huge ammounts of money should be spent on children who are not going to benifit, or that the money could brin greater returns elswhere. The country has to spend smarter, on people, projects and infrastructure that will give a good return. Socialism simply does not work to the nth degree. atlas123

12:43pm Tue 31 Dec 13

Aspie-Ambassador says...

Socialism to the nth degree!? You haven't got a clue have you, what this is about do you? If the child needed a wheelchair and specially trained staff to support him in every area, you wouldn't be saying its up to the parents and quasi political notions etc. the fact is that every child has rights, every disabled person has rights and every has human rights as enshrined by various laws. This child has neurological and developmental differences, "invisible" disabilities, and to ponder on economics is irrelevant and discriminatory.
Socialism to the nth degree!? You haven't got a clue have you, what this is about do you? If the child needed a wheelchair and specially trained staff to support him in every area, you wouldn't be saying its up to the parents and quasi political notions etc. the fact is that every child has rights, every disabled person has rights and every has human rights as enshrined by various laws. This child has neurological and developmental differences, "invisible" disabilities, and to ponder on economics is irrelevant and discriminatory. Aspie-Ambassador

12:54pm Tue 31 Dec 13

Owl sentinel says...

Would the person commenting on socialism prefer that , if the disability centred around wheelchairs, the wheelchair was taken from the child, stripped and sold on eBay so that the rest of the class could benefit for the fact that they have to put up with a disabled peer in their "normal" class!?

Well done AspieAmbassador for highlighting some issues!
Would the person commenting on socialism prefer that , if the disability centred around wheelchairs, the wheelchair was taken from the child, stripped and sold on eBay so that the rest of the class could benefit for the fact that they have to put up with a disabled peer in their "normal" class!? Well done AspieAmbassador for highlighting some issues! Owl sentinel

1:28pm Tue 31 Dec 13

Owl sentinel says...

There is another important issue which is that sometimes disabled children are also gifted and talented, and many thousands of such very able children are just not getting the opportunities they deserve. This affects our society and our economy, since we are deprived of great innovators, engineers, creative artists, mathematicians, etc etc
There is another important issue which is that sometimes disabled children are also gifted and talented, and many thousands of such very able children are just not getting the opportunities they deserve. This affects our society and our economy, since we are deprived of great innovators, engineers, creative artists, mathematicians, etc etc Owl sentinel

3:14pm Wed 1 Jan 14

Owl sentinel says...

Why should we judge whether they should be educated on the basis of their economic contribution? What's wrong with happy well adjusted and healthy children? What about their relationships and quality of life? They should not be scapegoats every time someone has a gripe about society and govt etc. disabled children are not objects or diagnoses or statistics or "problems" they are individuals complex and perfect as each person is.
Why should we judge whether they should be educated on the basis of their economic contribution? What's wrong with happy well adjusted and healthy children? What about their relationships and quality of life? They should not be scapegoats every time someone has a gripe about society and govt etc. disabled children are not objects or diagnoses or statistics or "problems" they are individuals complex and perfect as each person is. Owl sentinel

1:56pm Thu 2 Jan 14

aspie Au says...

All the help I needed.

Some times there was difficulties but I worked together with them. If people dont know what entitled to how is that everyone elses fault? My mum went and found the answers. She got on with it. Too many people expect everyone else to do and provide stuff and that is why society people get annoyed. Many of us see this mom chat on aspien networks and I wonder when she will just get on and do something than sit and moan all the time. Joins charities then moans about them. Starts things and walks away an moans about others. Now moans that none will make school fit the exact things she wants. None in school get exact to meet them disabled or able.
All the help I needed. Some times there was difficulties but I worked together with them. If people dont know what entitled to how is that everyone elses fault? My mum went and found the answers. She got on with it. Too many people expect everyone else to do and provide stuff and that is why society people get annoyed. Many of us see this mom chat on aspien networks and I wonder when she will just get on and do something than sit and moan all the time. Joins charities then moans about them. Starts things and walks away an moans about others. Now moans that none will make school fit the exact things she wants. None in school get exact to meet them disabled or able. aspie Au

2:08pm Thu 2 Jan 14

LadyTraveller says...

It is a fact that far too many children in this country have special needs which are not being met.

I have a son who is epileptic and has autism. We live in Scotland, and he attended a "special school" where you would have thought that he would be safe and cared for.

Not so.

Instead, he too was "restrained" when he did not understand what was being asked of him by the teacher. He got very upset and when he did not respond in the way SHE thought he should, FOUR teachers held my small epileptic child face down on the ground for over 30 minutes until he passed out and urinated. He suffered 63 bruises yes SIXTY THREE, that was not a typo and he also suffered other injuries consistent with asphyxiation.

For those people who think it is commonplace to "restrain" small children ask yourself how they restrain. In my childs case, those staff flew in the face of their training, they broke all the rules and my small, DISABLED child almost died.

What happened to those staff? NOTHING! They have been protected by the council and they are so confident now in their ability to carry on these barbaric practises that it is happening to other children in the same school over and over again. The council know exactly what is going on and their attitude is "thats just what they do there!"

Had I hurt my child in this way, he would have been removed from my care and I would have been jailed. Why is it ok for council employees to do this and not be held accountable?

There is no such thing as a safe restraint. Those who shrug restraint and seclusion off as being acceptable practice should be ashamed of themselves.

School should not hurt. Our disabled children have a right to an education and they have a right to be safe in school!. Yes, there will be behaviours that will be problematic, but these behaviours are almost always communicative behaviours because the child is trying to tell you something. I am ill, I am too hot/cold/hungry or I cannot cope. Find out what the child is trying to communicate, meet the need and the behaviour stops!

We need to stop the restraints and we must treat these children with the love, care and respect they deserve instead of allowing "educators" to overpower, restrain and use aversive tactics just because "thats what happens" Where is the outrage??
It is a fact that far too many children in this country have special needs which are not being met. I have a son who is epileptic and has autism. We live in Scotland, and he attended a "special school" where you would have thought that he would be safe and cared for. Not so. Instead, he too was "restrained" when he did not understand what was being asked of him by the teacher. He got very upset and when he did not respond in the way SHE thought he should, FOUR teachers held my small epileptic child face down on the ground for over 30 minutes until he passed out and urinated. He suffered 63 bruises yes SIXTY THREE, that was not a typo and he also suffered other injuries consistent with asphyxiation. For those people who think it is commonplace to "restrain" small children ask yourself how they restrain. In my childs case, those staff flew in the face of their training, they broke all the rules and my small, DISABLED child almost died. What happened to those staff? NOTHING! They have been protected by the council and they are so confident now in their ability to carry on these barbaric practises that it is happening to other children in the same school over and over again. The council know exactly what is going on and their attitude is "thats just what they do there!" Had I hurt my child in this way, he would have been removed from my care and I would have been jailed. Why is it ok for council employees to do this and not be held accountable? There is no such thing as a safe restraint. Those who shrug restraint and seclusion off as being acceptable practice should be ashamed of themselves. School should not hurt. Our disabled children have a right to an education and they have a right to be safe in school!. Yes, there will be behaviours that will be problematic, but these behaviours are almost always communicative behaviours because the child is trying to tell you something. I am ill, I am too hot/cold/hungry or I cannot cope. Find out what the child is trying to communicate, meet the need and the behaviour stops! We need to stop the restraints and we must treat these children with the love, care and respect they deserve instead of allowing "educators" to overpower, restrain and use aversive tactics just because "thats what happens" Where is the outrage?? LadyTraveller

2:15pm Thu 2 Jan 14

LadyTraveller says...

Aspie-Ambassador wrote:
There is research that shows Restraints in special school are much higher than in other schools, which implies that inappropriate and excessive force is used and that de escalation is not understood or applied. There is a restraints culture and autistic children are especially vulnerable to this kind of abuse from staff, which is easily masked by assumptions of behaviour etc. the LADO and other professionals who are not ASD trained fail these children regrettably.
I agree with you, and the saddest thing is, that if excessive force IS used, there is no protection for the child. All the protection goes to the staff and councils close ranks. This means those staff hold so much power, and all the training is ignored. De-escalation works! Yet the focus seems to remain on restraint as a first option.
I am sick and tired of hearing "Autistic Children are violent" as if this is justification for these aversive, often painful practices. You can not discipline autism out of a child. Aversives do not work!
[quote][p][bold]Aspie-Ambassador[/bold] wrote: There is research that shows Restraints in special school are much higher than in other schools, which implies that inappropriate and excessive force is used and that de escalation is not understood or applied. There is a restraints culture and autistic children are especially vulnerable to this kind of abuse from staff, which is easily masked by assumptions of behaviour etc. the LADO and other professionals who are not ASD trained fail these children regrettably.[/p][/quote]I agree with you, and the saddest thing is, that if excessive force IS used, there is no protection for the child. All the protection goes to the staff and councils close ranks. This means those staff hold so much power, and all the training is ignored. De-escalation works! Yet the focus seems to remain on restraint as a first option. I am sick and tired of hearing "Autistic Children are violent" as if this is justification for these aversive, often painful practices. You can not discipline autism out of a child. Aversives do not work! LadyTraveller

2:17pm Thu 2 Jan 14

aspie Au says...

All restraint is wrong for people like me and othrrs.
All restraint is wrong for people like me and othrrs. aspie Au

2:24pm Thu 2 Jan 14

aspie Au says...

I speak to some parents who want to move child to special needs settings and tell them more likely to restrain there as is common practises and a standard thing they do. In a mainstream school a teacher pushed me once to stop me hurting myself.In special school setting would be restrained weekly just for being in a bad mood!
I speak to some parents who want to move child to special needs settings and tell them more likely to restrain there as is common practises and a standard thing they do. In a mainstream school a teacher pushed me once to stop me hurting myself.In special school setting would be restrained weekly just for being in a bad mood! aspie Au

3:36pm Thu 2 Jan 14

autisticequality says...

Michelle Billington.
Michelle Billington. autisticequality

4:16pm Thu 2 Jan 14

LadyTraveller says...

aspie Au wrote:
All restraint is wrong for people like me and othrrs.
of course it is! Its de-humanising!
I wonder how the teachers would feel being restrained? Be a different matter then!

Where is the outrage people??

This is Children we are talking about!
[quote][p][bold]aspie Au[/bold] wrote: All restraint is wrong for people like me and othrrs.[/p][/quote]of course it is! Its de-humanising! I wonder how the teachers would feel being restrained? Be a different matter then! Where is the outrage people?? This is Children we are talking about! LadyTraveller

4:54pm Thu 2 Jan 14

M Blakemore says...

my son is in the article. obviously there are some terminology issues within the article but for the purposes of understanding his profile, he was originally diagnosed with moderate autism, MLD, epilpsy, dyspraxia, SPD a severe receptive and expressive language delay.

The council had a policy to not treat SPD which is difficult for a boy that is sensory led. Councils cannot and should not choose which disabilities they will acknowledge.

Some commentators have made personal remarks about myself, and this type of behaviour is exactly why children with special needs are not getting correct supports in the Nth West. Less time trying to fight each other and more time working on changing the system is required.

Yes, we did move to the UK. It is common for dual nationality marriages to relocate. When one country has a system for disability and another doesn’t, it increases motivation to relocate.

Restraint should be used to safeguard and never as a consequence of failing to provide the reasonable adjustments a vulnerable child requires and has been enshrined as their legal rights as part of an educational tribunal. To do so repeatedly is a sign of lack of training and expertise with autism. And The Grange School and their teaching practices have been criticised by OFSTED.

The Grange School did not adhere to the tribunal orders, and restrained him 42 times in 5mths. The journalist had been given documents that were obtained via a Data Protection request on The Grange School that include issues with the Chair of Governors and a failure on their part to adhere to Code of Practice on annual review processes.

Our family have been proactive in gaining meaningful supports for our children since before they were diagnosed. And we will continue to be so and will complain when our children are failed.
my son is in the article. obviously there are some terminology issues within the article but for the purposes of understanding his profile, he was originally diagnosed with moderate autism, MLD, epilpsy, dyspraxia, SPD a severe receptive and expressive language delay. The council had a policy to not treat SPD which is difficult for a boy that is sensory led. Councils cannot and should not choose which disabilities they will acknowledge. Some commentators have made personal remarks about myself, and this type of behaviour is exactly why children with special needs are not getting correct supports in the Nth West. Less time trying to fight each other and more time working on changing the system is required. Yes, we did move to the UK. It is common for dual nationality marriages to relocate. When one country has a system for disability and another doesn’t, it increases motivation to relocate. Restraint should be used to safeguard and never as a consequence of failing to provide the reasonable adjustments a vulnerable child requires and has been enshrined as their legal rights as part of an educational tribunal. To do so repeatedly is a sign of lack of training and expertise with autism. And The Grange School and their teaching practices have been criticised by OFSTED. The Grange School did not adhere to the tribunal orders, and restrained him 42 times in 5mths. The journalist had been given documents that were obtained via a Data Protection request on The Grange School that include issues with the Chair of Governors and a failure on their part to adhere to Code of Practice on annual review processes. Our family have been proactive in gaining meaningful supports for our children since before they were diagnosed. And we will continue to be so and will complain when our children are failed. M Blakemore

5:37pm Thu 2 Jan 14

Owl sentinel says...

M Blakemore wrote:
my son is in the article. obviously there are some terminology issues within the article but for the purposes of understanding his profile, he was originally diagnosed with moderate autism, MLD, epilpsy, dyspraxia, SPD a severe receptive and expressive language delay.

The council had a policy to not treat SPD which is difficult for a boy that is sensory led. Councils cannot and should not choose which disabilities they will acknowledge.

Some commentators have made personal remarks about myself, and this type of behaviour is exactly why children with special needs are not getting correct supports in the Nth West. Less time trying to fight each other and more time working on changing the system is required.

Yes, we did move to the UK. It is common for dual nationality marriages to relocate. When one country has a system for disability and another doesn’t, it increases motivation to relocate.

Restraint should be used to safeguard and never as a consequence of failing to provide the reasonable adjustments a vulnerable child requires and has been enshrined as their legal rights as part of an educational tribunal. To do so repeatedly is a sign of lack of training and expertise with autism. And The Grange School and their teaching practices have been criticised by OFSTED.

The Grange School did not adhere to the tribunal orders, and restrained him 42 times in 5mths. The journalist had been given documents that were obtained via a Data Protection request on The Grange School that include issues with the Chair of Governors and a failure on their part to adhere to Code of Practice on annual review processes.

Our family have been proactive in gaining meaningful supports for our children since before they were diagnosed. And we will continue to be so and will complain when our children are failed.
sPD is not understood by any county council and it's specialist providers, we have the same prob. ASD should like spd be understood and supported etc but my son was restrained over 85 times in a special school supposed to be "outstanding" .. The LA's involved have to provide and have a duty to provide ed etc to all children who are home ended with a sen. They have special money allocated called high needs funds and also from other budgets, without depriving other children! Lancs massively underspend and pretend they have no duty .. But whether parents elect or feel they have no choice re home educating, la still has to provide
[quote][p][bold]M Blakemore[/bold] wrote: my son is in the article. obviously there are some terminology issues within the article but for the purposes of understanding his profile, he was originally diagnosed with moderate autism, MLD, epilpsy, dyspraxia, SPD a severe receptive and expressive language delay. The council had a policy to not treat SPD which is difficult for a boy that is sensory led. Councils cannot and should not choose which disabilities they will acknowledge. Some commentators have made personal remarks about myself, and this type of behaviour is exactly why children with special needs are not getting correct supports in the Nth West. Less time trying to fight each other and more time working on changing the system is required. Yes, we did move to the UK. It is common for dual nationality marriages to relocate. When one country has a system for disability and another doesn’t, it increases motivation to relocate. Restraint should be used to safeguard and never as a consequence of failing to provide the reasonable adjustments a vulnerable child requires and has been enshrined as their legal rights as part of an educational tribunal. To do so repeatedly is a sign of lack of training and expertise with autism. And The Grange School and their teaching practices have been criticised by OFSTED. The Grange School did not adhere to the tribunal orders, and restrained him 42 times in 5mths. The journalist had been given documents that were obtained via a Data Protection request on The Grange School that include issues with the Chair of Governors and a failure on their part to adhere to Code of Practice on annual review processes. Our family have been proactive in gaining meaningful supports for our children since before they were diagnosed. And we will continue to be so and will complain when our children are failed.[/p][/quote]sPD is not understood by any county council and it's specialist providers, we have the same prob. ASD should like spd be understood and supported etc but my son was restrained over 85 times in a special school supposed to be "outstanding" .. The LA's involved have to provide and have a duty to provide ed etc to all children who are home ended with a sen. They have special money allocated called high needs funds and also from other budgets, without depriving other children! Lancs massively underspend and pretend they have no duty .. But whether parents elect or feel they have no choice re home educating, la still has to provide Owl sentinel

8:19pm Thu 2 Jan 14

Cat Webber says...

My son has autism and SPD and has been temporarily excluded from every single school that he has ever attended. I am currently battling the system to get him placed in a specialised school that will be able to deal with his behaviours without restraint or exclusion.
Only a few weeks ago we appeared in our local paper to highlight the issues us parents face. The article received a number of supportive comments from people across the nation. It is sad that someone who has helped so many is facing such a barrage from one or two individuals with a gripe.
It is hard enough for us to stand up against the system that is not supportive of people with neurological differences. Why do these few commenters with an obvious grudge try to take away from the point Monique is trying to make. We should stand in unity against the system, not against each other.
My son has autism and SPD and has been temporarily excluded from every single school that he has ever attended. I am currently battling the system to get him placed in a specialised school that will be able to deal with his behaviours without restraint or exclusion. Only a few weeks ago we appeared in our local paper to highlight the issues us parents face. The article received a number of supportive comments from people across the nation. It is sad that someone who has helped so many is facing such a barrage from one or two individuals with a gripe. It is hard enough for us to stand up against the system that is not supportive of people with neurological differences. Why do these few commenters with an obvious grudge try to take away from the point Monique is trying to make. We should stand in unity against the system, not against each other. Cat Webber

8:40pm Thu 2 Jan 14

K Beveridge says...

What I find most upsetting about some of these comments is the personal nature, why shouldn't someone fight for what their child deserves? Sorry but I find it repugnant when people begrudge a child getting what they are entitled to because their child isn't happy.
What I find most upsetting about some of these comments is the personal nature, why shouldn't someone fight for what their child deserves? Sorry but I find it repugnant when people begrudge a child getting what they are entitled to because their child isn't happy. K Beveridge

8:46pm Thu 2 Jan 14

LongGone says...

What is this simple economics which people speak? Complex, valid economics would take into account the likelihood of educated and supported people succeeding and becoming contributors, or using less care services; it would recognise that promoting decent education means promoting self esteem, and avoiding the high human and financial cost of the mental he's l th issues that follow many disabled people. Increasing evidence shows that, for life chances, early quality intervention is key after all. A mother, especially a well informed one, has a duty above all else to seek this for their child.

God forbid, if your lived one became disabled tomorrow, would you not give every ounce of fight for them?

As a fellow as d mum, not under informed in these matters my self, I have found the lady in the report to be enthusiastic, warm and supportive.
What is this simple economics which people speak? Complex, valid economics would take into account the likelihood of educated and supported people succeeding and becoming contributors, or using less care services; it would recognise that promoting decent education means promoting self esteem, and avoiding the high human and financial cost of the mental he's l th issues that follow many disabled people. Increasing evidence shows that, for life chances, early quality intervention is key after all. A mother, especially a well informed one, has a duty above all else to seek this for their child. God forbid, if your lived one became disabled tomorrow, would you not give every ounce of fight for them? As a fellow as d mum, not under informed in these matters my self, I have found the lady in the report to be enthusiastic, warm and supportive. LongGone

8:57pm Thu 2 Jan 14

gingerpig says...

Restraint should always be end game, not part of s disciplinary method. My ASD child attends a brilliant local special school and is sometimes violent, but has never been restrained as the teachers use proper de escalation techniques. If you're only shown violence in response to what you do, how are you ever going to learn?
Restraint should always be end game, not part of s disciplinary method. My ASD child attends a brilliant local special school and is sometimes violent, but has never been restrained as the teachers use proper de escalation techniques. If you're only shown violence in response to what you do, how are you ever going to learn? gingerpig

9:14pm Thu 2 Jan 14

M Broadbent says...

Fourth attempt to post. You are all incredibly lucky to have the courageous Monique And her family raising such issues both through Councils and the Media. Think of the positive outcomes which can and will be achieved for other children. Monique worked tirelessly in Australia for similar improvements in a system just not ready to adapt.
What is so ironic is that the thoughtless and personal attacks on her here are coming from those hiding behind pseudonyms. If you have a personal attack to make take it elsewhere. This is not your story. This is not your successful outcome. This is about what has been achieved. Monique offered her support voluntarily and has a heart of gold. For those ruthless enough to want to use that against her you must live with your own failings. For those of us who are willing to celebrate every step forward for acceptance, inclusion and change we will focus on the positive.
Monique stands proudly before us as an example of what we can all achieve with courage and knowledge that those with autism deserve better deals.
Fourth attempt to post. You are all incredibly lucky to have the courageous Monique And her family raising such issues both through Councils and the Media. Think of the positive outcomes which can and will be achieved for other children. Monique worked tirelessly in Australia for similar improvements in a system just not ready to adapt. What is so ironic is that the thoughtless and personal attacks on her here are coming from those hiding behind pseudonyms. If you have a personal attack to make take it elsewhere. This is not your story. This is not your successful outcome. This is about what has been achieved. Monique offered her support voluntarily and has a heart of gold. For those ruthless enough to want to use that against her you must live with your own failings. For those of us who are willing to celebrate every step forward for acceptance, inclusion and change we will focus on the positive. Monique stands proudly before us as an example of what we can all achieve with courage and knowledge that those with autism deserve better deals. M Broadbent

9:27pm Thu 2 Jan 14

SEN Advocate says...

I am absolutely appalled at the negativity on this post! We are all adults and this is not the place to spit our dummies out.

This was an innocent article of a mothers plight to secure appropriate education for her Son who has Sensory Distress in overwhelming environments and this has been inappropriately managed using restraint which was totally unnecessary had the setting had an appropriate understanding of the signs / triggers of over sensory stimulation.

I cannot believe people are starting a hate bashing campaign against Monique in which is a very obvious personal attack against her which is totally unecessary and this certainly is not the right arena for this.

I am a SEN Advocate and am very aware of the lack of understanding in education settings surrounding sensory difficulties, staff are not always appropriately trained to pick up on these triggers therefore a child becomes frustrated then is subsequently punished for a perfectly normal reaction given their sensory profile.

We are all parents, mothers, fathers, carers of SEN children why on earth are you hate bashing. For goodness sake we are all adults and I'm sure all of you would equally fight tooth and nail for your children and settle for no less than they deserve!

I know Monique's Son and he has never strikes me to be the type of child who would ever require physical force used against him. Monique is a pro active mother with an extremely diligent parenting approach.

I have Autism myself and I struggle with sensory difficulties as does my daughter. I equally fought and fought in order to secure my daughter the right placement for her difficulties.

I don't know why thus post became such a vendetta against Moniqie. If anyone has a personal problem you should go to her directly and not hide behind a made up I'd on a PC to do it.

Regarding other advocacy groups, if it's the one I'm thinking of we won't go there ........ Not on this post anyway.

Stop hate bashing, it's bullying and it's something we fight to stop for our kids everyday yet by the way you are treating Monique on here you are nothing more than a bully and it's very disappointing.......
.
I am absolutely appalled at the negativity on this post! We are all adults and this is not the place to spit our dummies out. This was an innocent article of a mothers plight to secure appropriate education for her Son who has Sensory Distress in overwhelming environments and this has been inappropriately managed using restraint which was totally unnecessary had the setting had an appropriate understanding of the signs / triggers of over sensory stimulation. I cannot believe people are starting a hate bashing campaign against Monique in which is a very obvious personal attack against her which is totally unecessary and this certainly is not the right arena for this. I am a SEN Advocate and am very aware of the lack of understanding in education settings surrounding sensory difficulties, staff are not always appropriately trained to pick up on these triggers therefore a child becomes frustrated then is subsequently punished for a perfectly normal reaction given their sensory profile. We are all parents, mothers, fathers, carers of SEN children why on earth are you hate bashing. For goodness sake we are all adults and I'm sure all of you would equally fight tooth and nail for your children and settle for no less than they deserve! I know Monique's Son and he has never strikes me to be the type of child who would ever require physical force used against him. Monique is a pro active mother with an extremely diligent parenting approach. I have Autism myself and I struggle with sensory difficulties as does my daughter. I equally fought and fought in order to secure my daughter the right placement for her difficulties. I don't know why thus post became such a vendetta against Moniqie. If anyone has a personal problem you should go to her directly and not hide behind a made up I'd on a PC to do it. Regarding other advocacy groups, if it's the one I'm thinking of we won't go there ........ Not on this post anyway. Stop hate bashing, it's bullying and it's something we fight to stop for our kids everyday yet by the way you are treating Monique on here you are nothing more than a bully and it's very disappointing....... . SEN Advocate

9:38pm Thu 2 Jan 14

ASD 4 ALL says...

Having read everyone's responses, I would say that everyone has something in common, you all have connections with Autism, you all have issues with LA's, you all have Educational issues and also issues with Restraint. Additionally, you all mention local Authorities having a lack of knowledge about Autism, SPD etc.

I would like to suggest that if all this negativity was turned into a positive venture, which would need to start with Autism Awareness, maybe start up groups in your local areas, join parent councils/PTA's, The best advocate for any child is their parents, but we all know that if we unite together then we are a stronger force to be reckoned with.

On the subject of restraint, I do not know any person/adult/carer who enjoys using restraint on a child. In fact this has now been changed to holding safely and there is documentation available to explain how this works, when it should be implemented and further from popular believe this should only be used as a last resort and other interventions should be attempted first. In the case of a small child, there should only be need for 1/2 people to be involved in any safe hold dependant on their size. There should also be a document held called an Individual Crisis Management Plan which would state all the stages from baseline to crisis and what works, what has worked in the past, triggers, escalation, outburst, what interventions should be used and this should be reviewed on a 6 weekly basis in conjunction with the child, their parent, social worker if applicable and Education provider.

I don't think you can condemn workers from using a tool which can be used safely, if the holding safely document is adhered to along with an ICMP. I know that this can be done safely. Questions I would be asking your LA, is does such documents exist, if so how often are they reviewed, who was involved in the application of the document, what method of Crisis Management is used in that district, some familiar ones are Therapeutic Crisis Intervention and CALM, the difference between the two is that TCI, is about keeping the child or young person safe, CALM is about protecting yourself, using reasonable force. I have been trained in both and TCI, is the better of the two as is relevant to children and young people.

I rarely require to use the holding safely intervention, as like many posting here, I am also a parent of a child with Autism and I have not been without the need to fight for my son in order to meet his needs, equally, I have never held my son back from trying new things, encouraged him to attend all groups and initially was met with the barrier of "oh he can join but you need to stay" with the response of "I will stay if every other parent with a child of my sons age is staying too, otherwise you are not treating him differently" most people embraced this and my son has came on in leaps and bounds. I also have a lot of experience of working with children with Autism in both special schools and main stream schools with good results - because I live breathe and see Autism, therefore know how I would feel if it was my son, I know that behaviours = communication for a lot of children not just kids on the spectrum and its best to stand back and observe without jumping in with both feet. My colleagues also gain from my knowledge which I share with them cos like I said its better to go into battle team handed than to stand alone in a crowd.

So stop attacking each other and share your experiences then we will all benefit in the long run.
Having read everyone's responses, I would say that everyone has something in common, you all have connections with Autism, you all have issues with LA's, you all have Educational issues and also issues with Restraint. Additionally, you all mention local Authorities having a lack of knowledge about Autism, SPD etc. I would like to suggest that if all this negativity was turned into a positive venture, which would need to start with Autism Awareness, maybe start up groups in your local areas, join parent councils/PTA's, The best advocate for any child is their parents, but we all know that if we unite together then we are a stronger force to be reckoned with. On the subject of restraint, I do not know any person/adult/carer who enjoys using restraint on a child. In fact this has now been changed to holding safely and there is documentation available to explain how this works, when it should be implemented and further from popular believe this should only be used as a last resort and other interventions should be attempted first. In the case of a small child, there should only be need for 1/2 people to be involved in any safe hold dependant on their size. There should also be a document held called an Individual Crisis Management Plan which would state all the stages from baseline to crisis and what works, what has worked in the past, triggers, escalation, outburst, what interventions should be used and this should be reviewed on a 6 weekly basis in conjunction with the child, their parent, social worker if applicable and Education provider. I don't think you can condemn workers from using a tool which can be used safely, if the holding safely document is adhered to along with an ICMP. I know that this can be done safely. Questions I would be asking your LA, is does such documents exist, if so how often are they reviewed, who was involved in the application of the document, what method of Crisis Management is used in that district, some familiar ones are Therapeutic Crisis Intervention and CALM, the difference between the two is that TCI, is about keeping the child or young person safe, CALM is about protecting yourself, using reasonable force. I have been trained in both and TCI, is the better of the two as is relevant to children and young people. I rarely require to use the holding safely intervention, as like many posting here, I am also a parent of a child with Autism and I have not been without the need to fight for my son in order to meet his needs, equally, I have never held my son back from trying new things, encouraged him to attend all groups and initially was met with the barrier of "oh he can join but you need to stay" with the response of "I will stay if every other parent with a child of my sons age is staying too, otherwise you are not treating him differently" most people embraced this and my son has came on in leaps and bounds. I also have a lot of experience of working with children with Autism in both special schools and main stream schools with good results - because I live breathe and see Autism, therefore know how I would feel if it was my son, I know that behaviours = communication for a lot of children not just kids on the spectrum and its best to stand back and observe without jumping in with both feet. My colleagues also gain from my knowledge which I share with them cos like I said its better to go into battle team handed than to stand alone in a crowd. So stop attacking each other and share your experiences then we will all benefit in the long run. ASD 4 ALL

9:44pm Thu 2 Jan 14

SEN Advocate says...

Here here ASD 4 All x
Here here ASD 4 All x SEN Advocate

10:18pm Thu 2 Jan 14

D Hollsworth says...

This thread really saddens me. There's a little vulnerable boy at the centre of this, and his mother is doing all she can to help him, for which she is being subjected to a character assassination. I know Monique, she has helped me in the past when I was battling with my own autism to advocate for my very young autistic daughter, who was about to start school. Monique didn't know me then but she gave me great advice and support. There was never any mention of her charging, nor did she ever mention charging to any other person she willingly helped in her various aspie groups. She is a well informed, well intentioned person, who has worked tirelessly to help all autistic people.

But all this is irrelevant!

Fundamentally, a tribunal made a legal decision and the council are not abiding by it. That is all that merits discussion here.
This thread really saddens me. There's a little vulnerable boy at the centre of this, and his mother is doing all she can to help him, for which she is being subjected to a character assassination. I know Monique, she has helped me in the past when I was battling with my own autism to advocate for my very young autistic daughter, who was about to start school. Monique didn't know me then but she gave me great advice and support. There was never any mention of her charging, nor did she ever mention charging to any other person she willingly helped in her various aspie groups. She is a well informed, well intentioned person, who has worked tirelessly to help all autistic people. But all this is irrelevant! Fundamentally, a tribunal made a legal decision and the council are not abiding by it. That is all that merits discussion here. D Hollsworth

10:25pm Thu 2 Jan 14

D Hollsworth says...

D Hollsworth wrote:
This thread really saddens me. There's a little vulnerable boy at the centre of this, and his mother is doing all she can to help him, for which she is being subjected to a character assassination. I know Monique, she has helped me in the past when I was battling with my own autism to advocate for my very young autistic daughter, who was about to start school. Monique didn't know me then but she gave me great advice and support. There was never any mention of her charging, nor did she ever mention charging to any other person she willingly helped in her various aspie groups. She is a well informed, well intentioned person, who has worked tirelessly to help all autistic people.

But all this is irrelevant!

Fundamentally, a tribunal made a legal decision and the council are not abiding by it. That is all that merits discussion here.
My apologies for an error in my previous post - I obviously cannot vouch for every single interaction Monique has had in the groups, I was trying to say that in the many, many interactions I've witnessed online between Monique and the various people she's helped, not once did I see any suggestion from her that she intended to charge for her services. All advice was freely offered, and very gladly taken by many, including me.
[quote][p][bold]D Hollsworth[/bold] wrote: This thread really saddens me. There's a little vulnerable boy at the centre of this, and his mother is doing all she can to help him, for which she is being subjected to a character assassination. I know Monique, she has helped me in the past when I was battling with my own autism to advocate for my very young autistic daughter, who was about to start school. Monique didn't know me then but she gave me great advice and support. There was never any mention of her charging, nor did she ever mention charging to any other person she willingly helped in her various aspie groups. She is a well informed, well intentioned person, who has worked tirelessly to help all autistic people. But all this is irrelevant! Fundamentally, a tribunal made a legal decision and the council are not abiding by it. That is all that merits discussion here.[/p][/quote]My apologies for an error in my previous post - I obviously cannot vouch for every single interaction Monique has had in the groups, I was trying to say that in the many, many interactions I've witnessed online between Monique and the various people she's helped, not once did I see any suggestion from her that she intended to charge for her services. All advice was freely offered, and very gladly taken by many, including me. D Hollsworth

10:30pm Thu 2 Jan 14

ASD 4 ALL says...

UNITED WE STAND - DIVIDED WE FALL. Don't let personal issues deflect away from a child receiving support that has been identified and is not being provided. This is not the parents doing, this is a LA not meeting the needs of a child. The next child could be yours!!!
UNITED WE STAND - DIVIDED WE FALL. Don't let personal issues deflect away from a child receiving support that has been identified and is not being provided. This is not the parents doing, this is a LA not meeting the needs of a child. The next child could be yours!!! ASD 4 ALL

10:36pm Thu 2 Jan 14

Autielady says...

Sickening that this article is being used for personal attacks.
I'm a mother/educator/Care
r of three wonderful young people with autism, sensory and multitude of other issues. I have been forced on more than one occasion to go down the SEN tribunal route because councils would rather spend (hundreds of tens of thousands of) our tax money on NOT providing a "adequate" education...the personnel concerned are more intent on showing their own departmental finances are on target than ensuring what every person in this country should feel is important - that every child should be taught according to their individual needs (how else can we raise a new generation to improve our country?!).
Money is always the issue, and in education (and health) that needs to stop.
Our children (with a "disability" or no) always have something to offer if they are just given that chance.
I applaud any parent who tries to raise the "autism" flag. Too many times our children are pushed aside to the margins, too many times are our children bullied and used, and never listened too.
This council, as ALL councils, should be using the funds given to them for the imtended use - not squirrelling the money away to use elsewhere. This is a long time by councils and schools that MUST stop. Use the funds appropriately and let our children have a chance!
Sickening that this article is being used for personal attacks. I'm a mother/educator/Care r of three wonderful young people with autism, sensory and multitude of other issues. I have been forced on more than one occasion to go down the SEN tribunal route because councils would rather spend (hundreds of tens of thousands of) our tax money on NOT providing a "adequate" education...the personnel concerned are more intent on showing their own departmental finances are on target than ensuring what every person in this country should feel is important - that every child should be taught according to their individual needs (how else can we raise a new generation to improve our country?!). Money is always the issue, and in education (and health) that needs to stop. Our children (with a "disability" or no) always have something to offer if they are just given that chance. I applaud any parent who tries to raise the "autism" flag. Too many times our children are pushed aside to the margins, too many times are our children bullied and used, and never listened too. This council, as ALL councils, should be using the funds given to them for the imtended use - not squirrelling the money away to use elsewhere. This is a long time by councils and schools that MUST stop. Use the funds appropriately and let our children have a chance! Autielady

10:39pm Thu 2 Jan 14

M Broadbent says...

GS why I suggest you take your personal attack elsewhere is because this not about YOU! This story is about what is happening for this little boy and should be celebrated not hijacked by personal vendetta.

I am horrified by some of the above comments attacking Monique for being a strong advocate. I bet if this was your child she was helping instead of her own you would want to be part of the story.

Online personal attacks are cowardly and uncalled for. Accusing someone of lying or indeed misrepresenting the level of your interaction with an individual in order to generate personal attacks on a person is un-necessary and hurtful. Consider the impact on the individual you are targeting - bullying takes many forms and some of the views expressed above get very personal and litigious.

Monique is truly inspirational and her support of autism unwavering. She will always have my support and voice to defend her as she has never been anything but polite, freely gives of her time, advice and shoulder when needed. The world needs more people like Monique!
GS why I suggest you take your personal attack elsewhere is because this not about YOU! This story is about what is happening for this little boy and should be celebrated not hijacked by personal vendetta. I am horrified by some of the above comments attacking Monique for being a strong advocate. I bet if this was your child she was helping instead of her own you would want to be part of the story. Online personal attacks are cowardly and uncalled for. Accusing someone of lying or indeed misrepresenting the level of your interaction with an individual in order to generate personal attacks on a person is un-necessary and hurtful. Consider the impact on the individual you are targeting - bullying takes many forms and some of the views expressed above get very personal and litigious. Monique is truly inspirational and her support of autism unwavering. She will always have my support and voice to defend her as she has never been anything but polite, freely gives of her time, advice and shoulder when needed. The world needs more people like Monique! M Broadbent

10:45pm Thu 2 Jan 14

lee 41 says...

mr.mark.c wrote:
Teachers have a duty to protect the children so restraining him would be common practice if he was being violent.
I dont know what this lady has done it total but a referal to CAMHS would help as they will push for more help.
How about the NAS ?
And also the school is within its rights to give her work packs for home that are taken to the school to be marked.
In my experience the CAMHS teams are very poor and offer inconsistent and under resourced therapies. Often they are inappropriate for the child's needs. Getting an assessment at all takes far too long ( 4months in our case) from GP referral during which time more damage is done. Good luck to this mum and keep trying.
[quote][p][bold]mr.mark.c[/bold] wrote: Teachers have a duty to protect the children so restraining him would be common practice if he was being violent. I dont know what this lady has done it total but a referal to CAMHS would help as they will push for more help. How about the NAS ? And also the school is within its rights to give her work packs for home that are taken to the school to be marked.[/p][/quote]In my experience the CAMHS teams are very poor and offer inconsistent and under resourced therapies. Often they are inappropriate for the child's needs. Getting an assessment at all takes far too long ( 4months in our case) from GP referral during which time more damage is done. Good luck to this mum and keep trying. lee 41

11:29pm Thu 2 Jan 14

Kwarren2 says...

Wait, I thought this was an article about a failure in the education system? NOT a chance to assassinate someone's character! Stick to the issues and hand people. Wether or nor you like this mother is NOT the point. She is as far as I can see fighting for her child's rights and good on her. It doesn't matter that in your dealings with her you felt slighted. If you have an issue with her take it up with her personally. What this equates to is Cyber Bullying, and no one should be subjected to that! Remember there are people at the end of the keyboards! People that feel emotional pain! You are adults so act like it.
Wait, I thought this was an article about a failure in the education system? NOT a chance to assassinate someone's character! Stick to the issues and hand people. Wether or nor you like this mother is NOT the point. She is as far as I can see fighting for her child's rights and good on her. It doesn't matter that in your dealings with her you felt slighted. If you have an issue with her take it up with her personally. What this equates to is Cyber Bullying, and no one should be subjected to that! Remember there are people at the end of the keyboards! People that feel emotional pain! You are adults so act like it. Kwarren2

1:18am Fri 3 Jan 14

mr.mark.c says...

The Education system works fine, the Autistic spectrum is very wide and nobody should expect special treatment for a single child in an SEB school.
Lever Park has 53 high school children, if a child gets very disruptive a teacher takes them home, if they get violent then they are restrained.
Looking at some comments on here some would want 53 teachers and it is not going to happen, live with it.
I remember a transport escort to the forwards centre being hit with a fire extinguisher and the child was restrained and no further action taken.
Take a moment to think about the staff and what they have to cope with before saying they have no right to restrain.
The Education system works fine, the Autistic spectrum is very wide and nobody should expect special treatment for a single child in an SEB school. Lever Park has 53 high school children, if a child gets very disruptive a teacher takes them home, if they get violent then they are restrained. Looking at some comments on here some would want 53 teachers and it is not going to happen, live with it. I remember a transport escort to the forwards centre being hit with a fire extinguisher and the child was restrained and no further action taken. Take a moment to think about the staff and what they have to cope with before saying they have no right to restrain. mr.mark.c

1:26am Fri 3 Jan 14

Owl sentinel says...

mr.mark.c wrote:
The Education system works fine, the Autistic spectrum is very wide and nobody should expect special treatment for a single child in an SEB school.
Lever Park has 53 high school children, if a child gets very disruptive a teacher takes them home, if they get violent then they are restrained.
Looking at some comments on here some would want 53 teachers and it is not going to happen, live with it.
I remember a transport escort to the forwards centre being hit with a fire extinguisher and the child was restrained and no further action taken.
Take a moment to think about the staff and what they have to cope with before saying they have no right to restrain.
Your example about the fire extinguisher just shows that you or your colleagues did not understand the child - de escalation is not just about when there's an incident, it's everything that happens before. I've seen restraint records and one of the striking things about them is that staff think an antecedent is just a description of what happened.. Which it is not. There are many non confrontational ways to deal with incidents in the instance that the child's needs have not been recognised or supported. No restraint is safe and a child's development and emotional health are compromised too often.
[quote][p][bold]mr.mark.c[/bold] wrote: The Education system works fine, the Autistic spectrum is very wide and nobody should expect special treatment for a single child in an SEB school. Lever Park has 53 high school children, if a child gets very disruptive a teacher takes them home, if they get violent then they are restrained. Looking at some comments on here some would want 53 teachers and it is not going to happen, live with it. I remember a transport escort to the forwards centre being hit with a fire extinguisher and the child was restrained and no further action taken. Take a moment to think about the staff and what they have to cope with before saying they have no right to restrain.[/p][/quote]Your example about the fire extinguisher just shows that you or your colleagues did not understand the child - de escalation is not just about when there's an incident, it's everything that happens before. I've seen restraint records and one of the striking things about them is that staff think an antecedent is just a description of what happened.. Which it is not. There are many non confrontational ways to deal with incidents in the instance that the child's needs have not been recognised or supported. No restraint is safe and a child's development and emotional health are compromised too often. Owl sentinel

1:32am Fri 3 Jan 14

Owl sentinel says...

mr.mark.c wrote:
The Education system works fine, the Autistic spectrum is very wide and nobody should expect special treatment for a single child in an SEB school.
Lever Park has 53 high school children, if a child gets very disruptive a teacher takes them home, if they get violent then they are restrained.
Looking at some comments on here some would want 53 teachers and it is not going to happen, live with it.
I remember a transport escort to the forwards centre being hit with a fire extinguisher and the child was restrained and no further action taken.
Take a moment to think about the staff and what they have to cope with before saying they have no right to restrain.
Also violence is a very discriminating and ignorant way to describe what are invariably defensive responses, ASD children in fight or flight mode. Conflating ASD difficulties or spd differences with psychopathic issues is very unhelpful and this is also indicative of the objectification and "otherness" that images it easier for institutional rationalisation for physical restraints and compliance of our most vulnerable children.
[quote][p][bold]mr.mark.c[/bold] wrote: The Education system works fine, the Autistic spectrum is very wide and nobody should expect special treatment for a single child in an SEB school. Lever Park has 53 high school children, if a child gets very disruptive a teacher takes them home, if they get violent then they are restrained. Looking at some comments on here some would want 53 teachers and it is not going to happen, live with it. I remember a transport escort to the forwards centre being hit with a fire extinguisher and the child was restrained and no further action taken. Take a moment to think about the staff and what they have to cope with before saying they have no right to restrain.[/p][/quote]Also violence is a very discriminating and ignorant way to describe what are invariably defensive responses, ASD children in fight or flight mode. Conflating ASD difficulties or spd differences with psychopathic issues is very unhelpful and this is also indicative of the objectification and "otherness" that images it easier for institutional rationalisation for physical restraints and compliance of our most vulnerable children. Owl sentinel

1:33am Fri 3 Jan 14

mr.mark.c says...

Owl sentinel wrote:
mr.mark.c wrote:
The Education system works fine, the Autistic spectrum is very wide and nobody should expect special treatment for a single child in an SEB school.
Lever Park has 53 high school children, if a child gets very disruptive a teacher takes them home, if they get violent then they are restrained.
Looking at some comments on here some would want 53 teachers and it is not going to happen, live with it.
I remember a transport escort to the forwards centre being hit with a fire extinguisher and the child was restrained and no further action taken.
Take a moment to think about the staff and what they have to cope with before saying they have no right to restrain.
Your example about the fire extinguisher just shows that you or your colleagues did not understand the child - de escalation is not just about when there's an incident, it's everything that happens before. I've seen restraint records and one of the striking things about them is that staff think an antecedent is just a description of what happened.. Which it is not. There are many non confrontational ways to deal with incidents in the instance that the child's needs have not been recognised or supported. No restraint is safe and a child's development and emotional health are compromised too often.
So attacking another person is fine ?
[quote][p][bold]Owl sentinel[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]mr.mark.c[/bold] wrote: The Education system works fine, the Autistic spectrum is very wide and nobody should expect special treatment for a single child in an SEB school. Lever Park has 53 high school children, if a child gets very disruptive a teacher takes them home, if they get violent then they are restrained. Looking at some comments on here some would want 53 teachers and it is not going to happen, live with it. I remember a transport escort to the forwards centre being hit with a fire extinguisher and the child was restrained and no further action taken. Take a moment to think about the staff and what they have to cope with before saying they have no right to restrain.[/p][/quote]Your example about the fire extinguisher just shows that you or your colleagues did not understand the child - de escalation is not just about when there's an incident, it's everything that happens before. I've seen restraint records and one of the striking things about them is that staff think an antecedent is just a description of what happened.. Which it is not. There are many non confrontational ways to deal with incidents in the instance that the child's needs have not been recognised or supported. No restraint is safe and a child's development and emotional health are compromised too often.[/p][/quote]So attacking another person is fine ? mr.mark.c

1:38am Fri 3 Jan 14

mr.mark.c says...

BTW, I was picking one of my sons up when the incident happened, I also saw a child restrained during an awards night, not pretty but he was going to attack the audience.
BTW, I was picking one of my sons up when the incident happened, I also saw a child restrained during an awards night, not pretty but he was going to attack the audience. mr.mark.c

1:59am Fri 3 Jan 14

K Beveridge says...

mr.mark.c wrote:
BTW, I was picking one of my sons up when the incident happened, I also saw a child restrained during an awards night, not pretty but he was going to attack the audience.
It is not acceptable for a child attack people, the question is why is the child wanting to attack? If you use the correct methods then the cause of the unwanted behaviour can be removed, ie if the child can't cope with noise don't force them to attend an awards night
[quote][p][bold]mr.mark.c[/bold] wrote: BTW, I was picking one of my sons up when the incident happened, I also saw a child restrained during an awards night, not pretty but he was going to attack the audience.[/p][/quote]It is not acceptable for a child attack people, the question is why is the child wanting to attack? If you use the correct methods then the cause of the unwanted behaviour can be removed, ie if the child can't cope with noise don't force them to attend an awards night K Beveridge

2:16am Fri 3 Jan 14

Owl sentinel says...

mr.mark.c wrote:
Owl sentinel wrote:
mr.mark.c wrote:
The Education system works fine, the Autistic spectrum is very wide and nobody should expect special treatment for a single child in an SEB school.
Lever Park has 53 high school children, if a child gets very disruptive a teacher takes them home, if they get violent then they are restrained.
Looking at some comments on here some would want 53 teachers and it is not going to happen, live with it.
I remember a transport escort to the forwards centre being hit with a fire extinguisher and the child was restrained and no further action taken.
Take a moment to think about the staff and what they have to cope with before saying they have no right to restrain.
Your example about the fire extinguisher just shows that you or your colleagues did not understand the child - de escalation is not just about when there's an incident, it's everything that happens before. I've seen restraint records and one of the striking things about them is that staff think an antecedent is just a description of what happened.. Which it is not. There are many non confrontational ways to deal with incidents in the instance that the child's needs have not been recognised or supported. No restraint is safe and a child's development and emotional health are compromised too often.
So attacking another person is fine ?
No it isn't fine but you are missing the point, which is that the child's needs are not being met for this to occur. Children inherently are good and want to be accepted. A child with sensory processing and emotional regulation difficulties needs a lot of support, a child with social communication problems also needs a lot of support. But if you are not trained in these areas, then invariably you will over-use restraints. You really can't see it, so frustrating!
[quote][p][bold]mr.mark.c[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Owl sentinel[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]mr.mark.c[/bold] wrote: The Education system works fine, the Autistic spectrum is very wide and nobody should expect special treatment for a single child in an SEB school. Lever Park has 53 high school children, if a child gets very disruptive a teacher takes them home, if they get violent then they are restrained. Looking at some comments on here some would want 53 teachers and it is not going to happen, live with it. I remember a transport escort to the forwards centre being hit with a fire extinguisher and the child was restrained and no further action taken. Take a moment to think about the staff and what they have to cope with before saying they have no right to restrain.[/p][/quote]Your example about the fire extinguisher just shows that you or your colleagues did not understand the child - de escalation is not just about when there's an incident, it's everything that happens before. I've seen restraint records and one of the striking things about them is that staff think an antecedent is just a description of what happened.. Which it is not. There are many non confrontational ways to deal with incidents in the instance that the child's needs have not been recognised or supported. No restraint is safe and a child's development and emotional health are compromised too often.[/p][/quote]So attacking another person is fine ?[/p][/quote]No it isn't fine but you are missing the point, which is that the child's needs are not being met for this to occur. Children inherently are good and want to be accepted. A child with sensory processing and emotional regulation difficulties needs a lot of support, a child with social communication problems also needs a lot of support. But if you are not trained in these areas, then invariably you will over-use restraints. You really can't see it, so frustrating! Owl sentinel

3:46am Fri 3 Jan 14

M Broadbent says...

GS we can agree that the main outcome for this article is the needs of the child, which due to the advocacy by his mother, and the eventual support of the system, now has a great outcome. We can all agree this is what we would all want for our own kids.

I also agree that we all have very different personal experiences with other people. This can happen in any walk of life, autism or not. The way we personally deal with it is the measure of our own personal compassion and understanding of others. Where we disagree is in the personal attacks on Monique which are not appropriate for an open forum but particularly when attached to this article. Perhaps this conversation would be better had in one of the many support groups to which Monique and yourself belong? It is important to understand that we are not always aware of what is happening in someone's life and personal attacks delivered in this way have the potential to cause great emotional distress, however well intentioned.

I appreciate my experiences have been rewarding, outstanding and extremely positive - and I am eternally grateful. I only hope that along the way the two of you may be able to address the unfortunate situation which is now affecting you both emotionally. We have never met and your name is not familiar to me from the support groups to which I belong but perhaps you go by another name in those groups? That is fine, as we all need our own safe zone but I would like to encourage you to make contact with Monique as she clearly does not remember you under the name GS, perhaps she may remember if you can give her more detail. Good luck and remember the earlier comments that as a community we are stronger if we support each other :)
GS we can agree that the main outcome for this article is the needs of the child, which due to the advocacy by his mother, and the eventual support of the system, now has a great outcome. We can all agree this is what we would all want for our own kids. I also agree that we all have very different personal experiences with other people. This can happen in any walk of life, autism or not. The way we personally deal with it is the measure of our own personal compassion and understanding of others. Where we disagree is in the personal attacks on Monique which are not appropriate for an open forum but particularly when attached to this article. Perhaps this conversation would be better had in one of the many support groups to which Monique and yourself belong? It is important to understand that we are not always aware of what is happening in someone's life and personal attacks delivered in this way have the potential to cause great emotional distress, however well intentioned. I appreciate my experiences have been rewarding, outstanding and extremely positive - and I am eternally grateful. I only hope that along the way the two of you may be able to address the unfortunate situation which is now affecting you both emotionally. We have never met and your name is not familiar to me from the support groups to which I belong but perhaps you go by another name in those groups? That is fine, as we all need our own safe zone but I would like to encourage you to make contact with Monique as she clearly does not remember you under the name GS, perhaps she may remember if you can give her more detail. Good luck and remember the earlier comments that as a community we are stronger if we support each other :) M Broadbent

9:58am Fri 3 Jan 14

rcooke01 says...

I used to work in a special school and often came across the mindset that staff shouldn't tolerated behaviour etc etc. Behaviour happens for a reason. The point of it being a special school is that the staffing levels are such to address individual needs. I can tell you I had very bad experience with my Asperger son in mainstream school which showed a complete misunderstanding of any aspects of autism. When he was out of that environment he thrived(he was in a unit as the special school said they couldn't cater for his academic needs). Keep fighting Monique-we need more like you
I used to work in a special school and often came across the mindset that staff shouldn't tolerated behaviour etc etc. Behaviour happens for a reason. The point of it being a special school is that the staffing levels are such to address individual needs. I can tell you I had very bad experience with my Asperger son in mainstream school which showed a complete misunderstanding of any aspects of autism. When he was out of that environment he thrived(he was in a unit as the special school said they couldn't cater for his academic needs). Keep fighting Monique-we need more like you rcooke01

10:16am Fri 3 Jan 14

Blazer97 says...

Fine to fight for your children's needs .Just because we are not in magazines, newspapers and at seminars speaking out doesn't mean to say we are below the lady in the article or should be made to feel that we are less informed than she is. I have joined a couple of excellent groups in Bolton who inform and advise but do not force their opinions on others.
Fine to fight for your children's needs .Just because we are not in magazines, newspapers and at seminars speaking out doesn't mean to say we are below the lady in the article or should be made to feel that we are less informed than she is. I have joined a couple of excellent groups in Bolton who inform and advise but do not force their opinions on others. Blazer97

12:56pm Fri 3 Jan 14

cliff4treasurer says...

This child should receive the education he needs in an ideal world, problem is we don't live in one and no matter what asper thingy says about economics not being relevant they are and always will be in any case of local authority provision.
We do what we can as taxpayers but sometimes not everyone can get what everyone needs.
As this lady comes from Australia perhaps we can all chip in to send her back with her son and see what provision he/she receives there?
Obviously not as good as here or she would have put him first and stopped there? Funny how he seems to be a priority now.
This child should receive the education he needs in an ideal world, problem is we don't live in one and no matter what asper thingy says about economics not being relevant they are and always will be in any case of local authority provision. We do what we can as taxpayers but sometimes not everyone can get what everyone needs. As this lady comes from Australia perhaps we can all chip in to send her back with her son and see what provision he/she receives there? Obviously not as good as here or she would have put him first and stopped there? Funny how he seems to be a priority now. cliff4treasurer

1:45pm Fri 3 Jan 14

brian jones says...

Do you know what the word 'acute' means, BN?
Do you know what the word 'acute' means, BN? brian jones

7:46pm Fri 3 Jan 14

aspie Au says...

I see people messages deleted which is not right as they were saying truth.If you do nothing wrong then you don't not need to remove or hide things.bad person.
I see people messages deleted which is not right as they were saying truth.If you do nothing wrong then you don't not need to remove or hide things.bad person. aspie Au

8:43pm Fri 3 Jan 14

Mumsword says...

I find it very sad that a news article about a mother seeking the right educational provision for her little boy with complex needs, has been turned into a witch hunt by a handful of people. This is surely NOT the platform on which personal opinions about this boy's mother should be aired. This is not about how much someone is liked or disliked, or has been perceived to be, by other people. This Mother works **** hard to raise awareness of autism and acceptance of autism here in the UK and also around the world. Autism Bubble Day reached literally millions of people globally last year and the Bubble Day pack underpinned a national campaign in South Africa, and was headlines at the 50th Anniversary of the Irish Autism Society. None of that would have happened had it not been for the mother in this article.
I find it very sad that a news article about a mother seeking the right educational provision for her little boy with complex needs, has been turned into a witch hunt by a handful of people. This is surely NOT the platform on which personal opinions about this boy's mother should be aired. This is not about how much someone is liked or disliked, or has been perceived to be, by other people. This Mother works **** hard to raise awareness of autism and acceptance of autism here in the UK and also around the world. Autism Bubble Day reached literally millions of people globally last year and the Bubble Day pack underpinned a national campaign in South Africa, and was headlines at the 50th Anniversary of the Irish Autism Society. None of that would have happened had it not been for the mother in this article. Mumsword

10:06pm Fri 3 Jan 14

Aspie-Ambassador says...

ASD 4 ALL wrote:
Having read everyone's responses, I would say that everyone has something in common, you all have connections with Autism, you all have issues with LA's, you all have Educational issues and also issues with Restraint. Additionally, you all mention local Authorities having a lack of knowledge about Autism, SPD etc.

I would like to suggest that if all this negativity was turned into a positive venture, which would need to start with Autism Awareness, maybe start up groups in your local areas, join parent councils/PTA's, The best advocate for any child is their parents, but we all know that if we unite together then we are a stronger force to be reckoned with.

On the subject of restraint, I do not know any person/adult/carer who enjoys using restraint on a child. In fact this has now been changed to holding safely and there is documentation available to explain how this works, when it should be implemented and further from popular believe this should only be used as a last resort and other interventions should be attempted first. In the case of a small child, there should only be need for 1/2 people to be involved in any safe hold dependant on their size. There should also be a document held called an Individual Crisis Management Plan which would state all the stages from baseline to crisis and what works, what has worked in the past, triggers, escalation, outburst, what interventions should be used and this should be reviewed on a 6 weekly basis in conjunction with the child, their parent, social worker if applicable and Education provider.

I don't think you can condemn workers from using a tool which can be used safely, if the holding safely document is adhered to along with an ICMP. I know that this can be done safely. Questions I would be asking your LA, is does such documents exist, if so how often are they reviewed, who was involved in the application of the document, what method of Crisis Management is used in that district, some familiar ones are Therapeutic Crisis Intervention and CALM, the difference between the two is that TCI, is about keeping the child or young person safe, CALM is about protecting yourself, using reasonable force. I have been trained in both and TCI, is the better of the two as is relevant to children and young people.

I rarely require to use the holding safely intervention, as like many posting here, I am also a parent of a child with Autism and I have not been without the need to fight for my son in order to meet his needs, equally, I have never held my son back from trying new things, encouraged him to attend all groups and initially was met with the barrier of "oh he can join but you need to stay" with the response of "I will stay if every other parent with a child of my sons age is staying too, otherwise you are not treating him differently" most people embraced this and my son has came on in leaps and bounds. I also have a lot of experience of working with children with Autism in both special schools and main stream schools with good results - because I live breathe and see Autism, therefore know how I would feel if it was my son, I know that behaviours = communication for a lot of children not just kids on the spectrum and its best to stand back and observe without jumping in with both feet. My colleagues also gain from my knowledge which I share with them cos like I said its better to go into battle team handed than to stand alone in a crowd.

So stop attacking each other and share your experiences then we will all benefit in the long run.
Your comment has some interesting points, especially re CALM and TCI. unfortunately Lancs LA has been keen to endorse the MEAT (Most Economically Advantageous) positive holding plan which is delivered by a company called Team Teach, and it is supposed to be about de escalation and a way if using reasonable force to protect staff in the most legal manner. The prob is that staff and schools have not then made reasonable accommodations and made it more ASD and SPD centred. So, staff wade in to "deescalate" by invading the overwhelmed child's personal space, use direct eye contact to show authority, use guided touch ie pat on the back or hand on arm for instance, use humour to distract or try to divert the child's attention with a fave topic, or start explaining what will happen if they don't comply or calm down, sometimes all during the same incident, and see it as giving "choices" and being "flexible" ... Which is totally unsupportive and the incident blows up so that more severe restraints are used and deemed necessary. The cycle of violence begins, chronically unsupported children becoming harder and harder to manage as they are more and more significantly harmed, physically, emotionally, educationally, developmentally. I have seen this happen to my son and also other children in Pontville, which is supposed to be great. That is why I would advise anybody to look at the sensory accommodations, organisation of classrooms and other areas indoor and outdoor, sensory and play equipment, and are the "cooling" rooms like a safe haven really, or like a prison cell?! I would ask questions and check whether the behaviour policy has been adapted to acknowledge sensory signals and social communication difficulipties, and how? I would check how the risk assessment is written and look at restraint reports, checking if antecedents are understood or if they are just descriptions of events. I would ask also how it is that despite many bright children with these difficulties, there is 0 per cent pupils with 5 GCSE's, in fact the performance tables are shocking and the school doesn't even record many of the targets. Yes we must advocate together for change, however. We Are a diverse group and the way our kids are treated by schools and LA can create massive problems which impact on us in many ways.. So it isn't always easy to communicate in a positive way, and hard to be tolerant. We have to try and be more understanding when people feel bitter and tired from it all. My child is wonderful but the rest of the world can really get me down some days!
[quote][p][bold]ASD 4 ALL[/bold] wrote: Having read everyone's responses, I would say that everyone has something in common, you all have connections with Autism, you all have issues with LA's, you all have Educational issues and also issues with Restraint. Additionally, you all mention local Authorities having a lack of knowledge about Autism, SPD etc. I would like to suggest that if all this negativity was turned into a positive venture, which would need to start with Autism Awareness, maybe start up groups in your local areas, join parent councils/PTA's, The best advocate for any child is their parents, but we all know that if we unite together then we are a stronger force to be reckoned with. On the subject of restraint, I do not know any person/adult/carer who enjoys using restraint on a child. In fact this has now been changed to holding safely and there is documentation available to explain how this works, when it should be implemented and further from popular believe this should only be used as a last resort and other interventions should be attempted first. In the case of a small child, there should only be need for 1/2 people to be involved in any safe hold dependant on their size. There should also be a document held called an Individual Crisis Management Plan which would state all the stages from baseline to crisis and what works, what has worked in the past, triggers, escalation, outburst, what interventions should be used and this should be reviewed on a 6 weekly basis in conjunction with the child, their parent, social worker if applicable and Education provider. I don't think you can condemn workers from using a tool which can be used safely, if the holding safely document is adhered to along with an ICMP. I know that this can be done safely. Questions I would be asking your LA, is does such documents exist, if so how often are they reviewed, who was involved in the application of the document, what method of Crisis Management is used in that district, some familiar ones are Therapeutic Crisis Intervention and CALM, the difference between the two is that TCI, is about keeping the child or young person safe, CALM is about protecting yourself, using reasonable force. I have been trained in both and TCI, is the better of the two as is relevant to children and young people. I rarely require to use the holding safely intervention, as like many posting here, I am also a parent of a child with Autism and I have not been without the need to fight for my son in order to meet his needs, equally, I have never held my son back from trying new things, encouraged him to attend all groups and initially was met with the barrier of "oh he can join but you need to stay" with the response of "I will stay if every other parent with a child of my sons age is staying too, otherwise you are not treating him differently" most people embraced this and my son has came on in leaps and bounds. I also have a lot of experience of working with children with Autism in both special schools and main stream schools with good results - because I live breathe and see Autism, therefore know how I would feel if it was my son, I know that behaviours = communication for a lot of children not just kids on the spectrum and its best to stand back and observe without jumping in with both feet. My colleagues also gain from my knowledge which I share with them cos like I said its better to go into battle team handed than to stand alone in a crowd. So stop attacking each other and share your experiences then we will all benefit in the long run.[/p][/quote]Your comment has some interesting points, especially re CALM and TCI. unfortunately Lancs LA has been keen to endorse the MEAT (Most Economically Advantageous) positive holding plan which is delivered by a company called Team Teach, and it is supposed to be about de escalation and a way if using reasonable force to protect staff in the most legal manner. The prob is that staff and schools have not then made reasonable accommodations and made it more ASD and SPD centred. So, staff wade in to "deescalate" by invading the overwhelmed child's personal space, use direct eye contact to show authority, use guided touch ie pat on the back or hand on arm for instance, use humour to distract or try to divert the child's attention with a fave topic, or start explaining what will happen if they don't comply or calm down, sometimes all during the same incident, and see it as giving "choices" and being "flexible" ... Which is totally unsupportive and the incident blows up so that more severe restraints are used and deemed necessary. The cycle of violence begins, chronically unsupported children becoming harder and harder to manage as they are more and more significantly harmed, physically, emotionally, educationally, developmentally. I have seen this happen to my son and also other children in Pontville, which is supposed to be great. That is why I would advise anybody to look at the sensory accommodations, organisation of classrooms and other areas indoor and outdoor, sensory and play equipment, and are the "cooling" rooms like a safe haven really, or like a prison cell?! I would ask questions and check whether the behaviour policy has been adapted to acknowledge sensory signals and social communication difficulipties, and how? I would check how the risk assessment is written and look at restraint reports, checking if antecedents are understood or if they are just descriptions of events. I would ask also how it is that despite many bright children with these difficulties, there is 0 per cent pupils with 5 GCSE's, in fact the performance tables are shocking and the school doesn't even record many of the targets. Yes we must advocate together for change, however. We Are a diverse group and the way our kids are treated by schools and LA can create massive problems which impact on us in many ways.. So it isn't always easy to communicate in a positive way, and hard to be tolerant. We have to try and be more understanding when people feel bitter and tired from it all. My child is wonderful but the rest of the world can really get me down some days! Aspie-Ambassador

10:50pm Fri 3 Jan 14

ASD 4 ALL says...

Hi Safe hold does not replace the need for risk assessments, de-escalation interventions or common sense, everyone regardless of diagnosis deserves individualised person centred plans in order that the interventions best meets the needs of the individual. As not every chocolate in a box is a coffee cream, therefore not every person will respond to the same intervention.

Like I say the methods I have been taught do not replace common sense and knowledge of individuals before deciding to hold safely. I would challenge the methods of restraints used, I would challeng on what interventions were attempted prior to the need for a safe hold, if individuals plans were followed and agreed on a six weekly basis, sooner following an incident as these should be used as learning tools ie well child A's behaviours escalated when i stepped into his space - relevant intervention therefore would be to manage the environment - its not always possible to move a child who is in crisis, but if you can move the other children to another area to allow you to calm child A then you may get better results. additionally not everyone wants or likes people to touch them, so a caring gesture might work for some but not for everyone and may actually escalate the situation, so again staff could learn from this.

It is then important that staff share the information with their colleagues so everyone knows what has been tried and worked or more importantly what has been tried and failed.
Hi Safe hold does not replace the need for risk assessments, de-escalation interventions or common sense, everyone regardless of diagnosis deserves individualised person centred plans in order that the interventions best meets the needs of the individual. As not every chocolate in a box is a coffee cream, therefore not every person will respond to the same intervention. Like I say the methods I have been taught do not replace common sense and knowledge of individuals before deciding to hold safely. I would challenge the methods of restraints used, I would challeng on what interventions were attempted prior to the need for a safe hold, if individuals plans were followed and agreed on a six weekly basis, sooner following an incident as these should be used as learning tools ie well child A's behaviours escalated when i stepped into his space - relevant intervention therefore would be to manage the environment - its not always possible to move a child who is in crisis, but if you can move the other children to another area to allow you to calm child A then you may get better results. additionally not everyone wants or likes people to touch them, so a caring gesture might work for some but not for everyone and may actually escalate the situation, so again staff could learn from this. It is then important that staff share the information with their colleagues so everyone knows what has been tried and worked or more importantly what has been tried and failed. ASD 4 ALL

11:16pm Fri 3 Jan 14

Aspie-Ambassador says...

ASD 4 ALL wrote:
Hi Safe hold does not replace the need for risk assessments, de-escalation interventions or common sense, everyone regardless of diagnosis deserves individualised person centred plans in order that the interventions best meets the needs of the individual. As not every chocolate in a box is a coffee cream, therefore not every person will respond to the same intervention.

Like I say the methods I have been taught do not replace common sense and knowledge of individuals before deciding to hold safely. I would challenge the methods of restraints used, I would challeng on what interventions were attempted prior to the need for a safe hold, if individuals plans were followed and agreed on a six weekly basis, sooner following an incident as these should be used as learning tools ie well child A's behaviours escalated when i stepped into his space - relevant intervention therefore would be to manage the environment - its not always possible to move a child who is in crisis, but if you can move the other children to another area to allow you to calm child A then you may get better results. additionally not everyone wants or likes people to touch them, so a caring gesture might work for some but not for everyone and may actually escalate the situation, so again staff could learn from this.

It is then important that staff share the information with their colleagues so everyone knows what has been tried and worked or more importantly what has been tried and failed.
Hi well that sounds sensible but regrettably my experience was a blanket response from school re de escalation and holds etc, and nothing changed. In fact school attacked me for being pathologically overprotective instead!
[quote][p][bold]ASD 4 ALL[/bold] wrote: Hi Safe hold does not replace the need for risk assessments, de-escalation interventions or common sense, everyone regardless of diagnosis deserves individualised person centred plans in order that the interventions best meets the needs of the individual. As not every chocolate in a box is a coffee cream, therefore not every person will respond to the same intervention. Like I say the methods I have been taught do not replace common sense and knowledge of individuals before deciding to hold safely. I would challenge the methods of restraints used, I would challeng on what interventions were attempted prior to the need for a safe hold, if individuals plans were followed and agreed on a six weekly basis, sooner following an incident as these should be used as learning tools ie well child A's behaviours escalated when i stepped into his space - relevant intervention therefore would be to manage the environment - its not always possible to move a child who is in crisis, but if you can move the other children to another area to allow you to calm child A then you may get better results. additionally not everyone wants or likes people to touch them, so a caring gesture might work for some but not for everyone and may actually escalate the situation, so again staff could learn from this. It is then important that staff share the information with their colleagues so everyone knows what has been tried and worked or more importantly what has been tried and failed.[/p][/quote]Hi well that sounds sensible but regrettably my experience was a blanket response from school re de escalation and holds etc, and nothing changed. In fact school attacked me for being pathologically overprotective instead! Aspie-Ambassador

11:40pm Fri 3 Jan 14

ASD 4 ALL says...

I am in Scotland so maybe we work differently, but I would say that any parent who believes that the school are being heavy handed with their child has a right to contact Police and press charges it will then be up to the schools to defend their methods of de-escalation and safe holds.

The fact that they still refer to it as restraint, is barbaric. Their is plenty of social inquiries that has changed how things work in both England and Scotland. Although their is still a divide, but I would say armed with the knowledge that these inquiries can hold can be useful in stating your case,
I am in Scotland so maybe we work differently, but I would say that any parent who believes that the school are being heavy handed with their child has a right to contact Police and press charges it will then be up to the schools to defend their methods of de-escalation and safe holds. The fact that they still refer to it as restraint, is barbaric. Their is plenty of social inquiries that has changed how things work in both England and Scotland. Although their is still a divide, but I would say armed with the knowledge that these inquiries can hold can be useful in stating your case, ASD 4 ALL

12:32am Sat 4 Jan 14

Aspie-Ambassador says...

ASD 4 ALL wrote:
I am in Scotland so maybe we work differently, but I would say that any parent who believes that the school are being heavy handed with their child has a right to contact Police and press charges it will then be up to the schools to defend their methods of de-escalation and safe holds.

The fact that they still refer to it as restraint, is barbaric. Their is plenty of social inquiries that has changed how things work in both England and Scotland. Although their is still a divide, but I would say armed with the knowledge that these inquiries can hold can be useful in stating your case,
Thank you for your reply, despite Freedom of info requests, Subject Access requests, phone calls to police regarding serious safeguarding complaints, both LA and school have hidden and altered records etc and are trying to get me to return my child to this placement, and though other parents have complained about restraints too (10 since 2006 have been through complaints procedure) I have been presented as a mad mum and am trying to do what I can... But proper procedure wasn't followed and this prob scuppered case further. I showed lots evidence such as inadequate risk assessments, lack sensory accommodations in the hope of improving support for my son and also his peers. But soon realised nothing was going to change and that in fact they didnt care, it's a very closed door place, how many parents ever even twig?. I suppose, to avoid getting into trouble, I should advise you that I don't intend to cause malicious rumour etc and that my complaints are presently regarded as " unsubstantiated." And that Ofsted deems this school "outstanding." And that these are views etc etc..Thank you again for your supportive response.
[quote][p][bold]ASD 4 ALL[/bold] wrote: I am in Scotland so maybe we work differently, but I would say that any parent who believes that the school are being heavy handed with their child has a right to contact Police and press charges it will then be up to the schools to defend their methods of de-escalation and safe holds. The fact that they still refer to it as restraint, is barbaric. Their is plenty of social inquiries that has changed how things work in both England and Scotland. Although their is still a divide, but I would say armed with the knowledge that these inquiries can hold can be useful in stating your case,[/p][/quote]Thank you for your reply, despite Freedom of info requests, Subject Access requests, phone calls to police regarding serious safeguarding complaints, both LA and school have hidden and altered records etc and are trying to get me to return my child to this placement, and though other parents have complained about restraints too (10 since 2006 have been through complaints procedure) I have been presented as a mad mum and am trying to do what I can... But proper procedure wasn't followed and this prob scuppered case further. I showed lots evidence such as inadequate risk assessments, lack sensory accommodations in the hope of improving support for my son and also his peers. But soon realised nothing was going to change and that in fact they didnt care, it's a very closed door place, how many parents ever even twig?. I suppose, to avoid getting into trouble, I should advise you that I don't intend to cause malicious rumour etc and that my complaints are presently regarded as " unsubstantiated." And that Ofsted deems this school "outstanding." And that these are views etc etc..Thank you again for your supportive response. Aspie-Ambassador

1:20am Sat 4 Jan 14

M Blakemore says...

Aspie-Ambassador wrote:
ASD 4 ALL wrote:
I am in Scotland so maybe we work differently, but I would say that any parent who believes that the school are being heavy handed with their child has a right to contact Police and press charges it will then be up to the schools to defend their methods of de-escalation and safe holds.

The fact that they still refer to it as restraint, is barbaric. Their is plenty of social inquiries that has changed how things work in both England and Scotland. Although their is still a divide, but I would say armed with the knowledge that these inquiries can hold can be useful in stating your case,
Thank you for your reply, despite Freedom of info requests, Subject Access requests, phone calls to police regarding serious safeguarding complaints, both LA and school have hidden and altered records etc and are trying to get me to return my child to this placement, and though other parents have complained about restraints too (10 since 2006 have been through complaints procedure) I have been presented as a mad mum and am trying to do what I can... But proper procedure wasn't followed and this prob scuppered case further. I showed lots evidence such as inadequate risk assessments, lack sensory accommodations in the hope of improving support for my son and also his peers. But soon realised nothing was going to change and that in fact they didnt care, it's a very closed door place, how many parents ever even twig?. I suppose, to avoid getting into trouble, I should advise you that I don't intend to cause malicious rumour etc and that my complaints are presently regarded as " unsubstantiated." And that Ofsted deems this school "outstanding." And that these are views etc etc..Thank you again for your supportive response.
Matthew was subjected to 2 person restraint and I was not aware until given the IEP and then the behaviour management plan. The Grange School gave me a bundle of incident reports of 42 incidents in the 5 months he attended.

The Grange School set him up to not be successful. An IEP said he lacked confidence when asked questions. A strategy was to get the other kids to help him. The Behaviour Management Plan said, he didn't like the kids telling him what to do and this escalated into a 2 person restraint.

Regardless of people views on economics, the fact is, a tribunal ordered the supports my son required. They are his legal rights not a parental wish list. Any parent can do the same for their child.

Bolton do not correctly apply the law in their transport policy, their failure to recognise / assess / treat Sensory Processing Disorders and the Bolton NHS had a written policy (done without consultation) to not assess, treat or diagnose adults with ADHD or an Autism Spectrum Disorder.

I was told verbally and in writing by The Grange School that my sons SEN Statement was "too prescriptive". What this means, I did my job well as his mother. Who would think that a LEA would go against a court order???
[quote][p][bold]Aspie-Ambassador[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]ASD 4 ALL[/bold] wrote: I am in Scotland so maybe we work differently, but I would say that any parent who believes that the school are being heavy handed with their child has a right to contact Police and press charges it will then be up to the schools to defend their methods of de-escalation and safe holds. The fact that they still refer to it as restraint, is barbaric. Their is plenty of social inquiries that has changed how things work in both England and Scotland. Although their is still a divide, but I would say armed with the knowledge that these inquiries can hold can be useful in stating your case,[/p][/quote]Thank you for your reply, despite Freedom of info requests, Subject Access requests, phone calls to police regarding serious safeguarding complaints, both LA and school have hidden and altered records etc and are trying to get me to return my child to this placement, and though other parents have complained about restraints too (10 since 2006 have been through complaints procedure) I have been presented as a mad mum and am trying to do what I can... But proper procedure wasn't followed and this prob scuppered case further. I showed lots evidence such as inadequate risk assessments, lack sensory accommodations in the hope of improving support for my son and also his peers. But soon realised nothing was going to change and that in fact they didnt care, it's a very closed door place, how many parents ever even twig?. I suppose, to avoid getting into trouble, I should advise you that I don't intend to cause malicious rumour etc and that my complaints are presently regarded as " unsubstantiated." And that Ofsted deems this school "outstanding." And that these are views etc etc..Thank you again for your supportive response.[/p][/quote]Matthew was subjected to 2 person restraint and I was not aware until given the IEP and then the behaviour management plan. The Grange School gave me a bundle of incident reports of 42 incidents in the 5 months he attended. The Grange School set him up to not be successful. An IEP said he lacked confidence when asked questions. A strategy was to get the other kids to help him. The Behaviour Management Plan said, he didn't like the kids telling him what to do and this escalated into a 2 person restraint. Regardless of people views on economics, the fact is, a tribunal ordered the supports my son required. They are his legal rights not a parental wish list. Any parent can do the same for their child. Bolton do not correctly apply the law in their transport policy, their failure to recognise / assess / treat Sensory Processing Disorders and the Bolton NHS had a written policy (done without consultation) to not assess, treat or diagnose adults with ADHD or an Autism Spectrum Disorder. I was told verbally and in writing by The Grange School that my sons SEN Statement was "too prescriptive". What this means, I did my job well as his mother. Who would think that a LEA would go against a court order??? M Blakemore

2:25am Sat 4 Jan 14

Aspie-Ambassador says...

M Blakemore wrote:
Aspie-Ambassador wrote:
ASD 4 ALL wrote:
I am in Scotland so maybe we work differently, but I would say that any parent who believes that the school are being heavy handed with their child has a right to contact Police and press charges it will then be up to the schools to defend their methods of de-escalation and safe holds.

The fact that they still refer to it as restraint, is barbaric. Their is plenty of social inquiries that has changed how things work in both England and Scotland. Although their is still a divide, but I would say armed with the knowledge that these inquiries can hold can be useful in stating your case,
Thank you for your reply, despite Freedom of info requests, Subject Access requests, phone calls to police regarding serious safeguarding complaints, both LA and school have hidden and altered records etc and are trying to get me to return my child to this placement, and though other parents have complained about restraints too (10 since 2006 have been through complaints procedure) I have been presented as a mad mum and am trying to do what I can... But proper procedure wasn't followed and this prob scuppered case further. I showed lots evidence such as inadequate risk assessments, lack sensory accommodations in the hope of improving support for my son and also his peers. But soon realised nothing was going to change and that in fact they didnt care, it's a very closed door place, how many parents ever even twig?. I suppose, to avoid getting into trouble, I should advise you that I don't intend to cause malicious rumour etc and that my complaints are presently regarded as " unsubstantiated." And that Ofsted deems this school "outstanding." And that these are views etc etc..Thank you again for your supportive response.
Matthew was subjected to 2 person restraint and I was not aware until given the IEP and then the behaviour management plan. The Grange School gave me a bundle of incident reports of 42 incidents in the 5 months he attended.

The Grange School set him up to not be successful. An IEP said he lacked confidence when asked questions. A strategy was to get the other kids to help him. The Behaviour Management Plan said, he didn't like the kids telling him what to do and this escalated into a 2 person restraint.

Regardless of people views on economics, the fact is, a tribunal ordered the supports my son required. They are his legal rights not a parental wish list. Any parent can do the same for their child.

Bolton do not correctly apply the law in their transport policy, their failure to recognise / assess / treat Sensory Processing Disorders and the Bolton NHS had a written policy (done without consultation) to not assess, treat or diagnose adults with ADHD or an Autism Spectrum Disorder.

I was told verbally and in writing by The Grange School that my sons SEN Statement was "too prescriptive". What this means, I did my job well as his mother. Who would think that a LEA would go against a court order???
I hear you, believe me, in 6 months there were 85 recorded restraints - and I know from witnessing afew of the "minor" ones that would have become more serious had I not been there, that there was no reasonable cause and no danger of property or harm, but order was compromised since my son was refusing to go to registration (the underlying reason was he couldn't face ICT as no sensory accommodations were made for multiple issues )!

We face a lot of unlawful decisions made by public bodies and schools, and huge ignorance too, re our children's real needs. The LA doesn't want us to get anywhere as it will expose their unlawful actions, and force them to provide. Edyourself.org is a useful website, as is DfE and ico, also have valuable info. There is no better tool than education for us. But it is hard to get justice without legal representation, and the cuts to legal aid make it worse.
Good luck.
[quote][p][bold]M Blakemore[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Aspie-Ambassador[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]ASD 4 ALL[/bold] wrote: I am in Scotland so maybe we work differently, but I would say that any parent who believes that the school are being heavy handed with their child has a right to contact Police and press charges it will then be up to the schools to defend their methods of de-escalation and safe holds. The fact that they still refer to it as restraint, is barbaric. Their is plenty of social inquiries that has changed how things work in both England and Scotland. Although their is still a divide, but I would say armed with the knowledge that these inquiries can hold can be useful in stating your case,[/p][/quote]Thank you for your reply, despite Freedom of info requests, Subject Access requests, phone calls to police regarding serious safeguarding complaints, both LA and school have hidden and altered records etc and are trying to get me to return my child to this placement, and though other parents have complained about restraints too (10 since 2006 have been through complaints procedure) I have been presented as a mad mum and am trying to do what I can... But proper procedure wasn't followed and this prob scuppered case further. I showed lots evidence such as inadequate risk assessments, lack sensory accommodations in the hope of improving support for my son and also his peers. But soon realised nothing was going to change and that in fact they didnt care, it's a very closed door place, how many parents ever even twig?. I suppose, to avoid getting into trouble, I should advise you that I don't intend to cause malicious rumour etc and that my complaints are presently regarded as " unsubstantiated." And that Ofsted deems this school "outstanding." And that these are views etc etc..Thank you again for your supportive response.[/p][/quote]Matthew was subjected to 2 person restraint and I was not aware until given the IEP and then the behaviour management plan. The Grange School gave me a bundle of incident reports of 42 incidents in the 5 months he attended. The Grange School set him up to not be successful. An IEP said he lacked confidence when asked questions. A strategy was to get the other kids to help him. The Behaviour Management Plan said, he didn't like the kids telling him what to do and this escalated into a 2 person restraint. Regardless of people views on economics, the fact is, a tribunal ordered the supports my son required. They are his legal rights not a parental wish list. Any parent can do the same for their child. Bolton do not correctly apply the law in their transport policy, their failure to recognise / assess / treat Sensory Processing Disorders and the Bolton NHS had a written policy (done without consultation) to not assess, treat or diagnose adults with ADHD or an Autism Spectrum Disorder. I was told verbally and in writing by The Grange School that my sons SEN Statement was "too prescriptive". What this means, I did my job well as his mother. Who would think that a LEA would go against a court order???[/p][/quote]I hear you, believe me, in 6 months there were 85 recorded restraints - and I know from witnessing afew of the "minor" ones that would have become more serious had I not been there, that there was no reasonable cause and no danger of property or harm, but order was compromised since my son was refusing to go to registration (the underlying reason was he couldn't face ICT as no sensory accommodations were made for multiple issues )! We face a lot of unlawful decisions made by public bodies and schools, and huge ignorance too, re our children's real needs. The LA doesn't want us to get anywhere as it will expose their unlawful actions, and force them to provide. Edyourself.org is a useful website, as is DfE and ico, also have valuable info. There is no better tool than education for us. But it is hard to get justice without legal representation, and the cuts to legal aid make it worse. Good luck. Aspie-Ambassador

2:38am Sat 4 Jan 14

Aspie-Ambassador says...

re: "Bolton do not correctly apply the law in their transport policy, their failure to recognise / assess / treat Sensory Processing Disorders and the Bolton NHS had a written policy (done without consultation) to not assess, treat or diagnose adults with ADHD or an Autism Spectrum Disorder. "

...appalling! But does this written policy apply to children? Sensory processing disorder is not understood across the board. And special schools are not generally very special except for their intake of pupils. They are not legally obliged to have special knowledge or training. And if you look at Ofsted reports, the inspectors don't know what to look for and don't report on how successful de escalation methods are, levels of restraint, design and layout etc. and then the LA safeguarding officer doesn't necessarily know about ASD or SPD which begs the question how can the threshold for significant harm be measured? The LA and other agencies such as Ed Psychs etc know that excessive and inappropriate physical restraint culture is rife. We are not well equipped to expose it though.
re: "Bolton do not correctly apply the law in their transport policy, their failure to recognise / assess / treat Sensory Processing Disorders and the Bolton NHS had a written policy (done without consultation) to not assess, treat or diagnose adults with ADHD or an Autism Spectrum Disorder. " ...appalling! But does this written policy apply to children? Sensory processing disorder is not understood across the board. And special schools are not generally very special except for their intake of pupils. They are not legally obliged to have special knowledge or training. And if you look at Ofsted reports, the inspectors don't know what to look for and don't report on how successful de escalation methods are, levels of restraint, design and layout etc. and then the LA safeguarding officer doesn't necessarily know about ASD or SPD which begs the question how can the threshold for significant harm be measured? The LA and other agencies such as Ed Psychs etc know that excessive and inappropriate physical restraint culture is rife. We are not well equipped to expose it though. Aspie-Ambassador

11:06am Sat 4 Jan 14

ASD 4 ALL says...

Recently there was a documentary exposing excessive restraints in a special needs placement. it may be worth collrctively wwriting your experiences and passing this information onto the media. like i say safe hold is a last resort not an intervention. staff need better education. ofsted need a hard shake if they cant see this. Is there quality assurance on incident forms? Who does monthly audits? What happens with this information how is it evaluated? Could a parent do a survey like a student would do and contact a few special and main stream schools to find out about average restraints in sxhools then take the information to ofsted and ask the question WHY? Also contact mps for their support.
Recently there was a documentary exposing excessive restraints in a special needs placement. it may be worth collrctively wwriting your experiences and passing this information onto the media. like i say safe hold is a last resort not an intervention. staff need better education. ofsted need a hard shake if they cant see this. Is there quality assurance on incident forms? Who does monthly audits? What happens with this information how is it evaluated? Could a parent do a survey like a student would do and contact a few special and main stream schools to find out about average restraints in sxhools then take the information to ofsted and ask the question WHY? Also contact mps for their support. ASD 4 ALL

1:07pm Sat 4 Jan 14

Aspie-Ambassador says...

ASD 4 ALL wrote:
Recently there was a documentary exposing excessive restraints in a special needs placement. it may be worth collrctively wwriting your experiences and passing this information onto the media. like i say safe hold is a last resort not an intervention. staff need better education. ofsted need a hard shake if they cant see this. Is there quality assurance on incident forms? Who does monthly audits? What happens with this information how is it evaluated? Could a parent do a survey like a student would do and contact a few special and main stream schools to find out about average restraints in sxhools then take the information to ofsted and ask the question WHY? Also contact mps for their support.
I agree we do need to collate our experiences and also a set of evaluative criteria and data which can back up and quantify these experiences. I've been thinking how to do this, and then maybe writing an open letter to press, minister of education, local govt ombudsman for ed, Ofsted NSPCC NAS, and similar. Anyone got any ideas, should we set up a website or Facebook page? We could look at restraints. We also should think how to challenge collectively the unlawful actions taken by schools and LA. I'm open to ideas.
[quote][p][bold]ASD 4 ALL[/bold] wrote: Recently there was a documentary exposing excessive restraints in a special needs placement. it may be worth collrctively wwriting your experiences and passing this information onto the media. like i say safe hold is a last resort not an intervention. staff need better education. ofsted need a hard shake if they cant see this. Is there quality assurance on incident forms? Who does monthly audits? What happens with this information how is it evaluated? Could a parent do a survey like a student would do and contact a few special and main stream schools to find out about average restraints in sxhools then take the information to ofsted and ask the question WHY? Also contact mps for their support.[/p][/quote]I agree we do need to collate our experiences and also a set of evaluative criteria and data which can back up and quantify these experiences. I've been thinking how to do this, and then maybe writing an open letter to press, minister of education, local govt ombudsman for ed, Ofsted NSPCC NAS, and similar. Anyone got any ideas, should we set up a website or Facebook page? We could look at restraints. We also should think how to challenge collectively the unlawful actions taken by schools and LA. I'm open to ideas. Aspie-Ambassador

1:46pm Sat 4 Jan 14

ASD 4 ALL says...

Let me think about how it could be achieved and get back to you once i am home and on laptop.
Let me think about how it could be achieved and get back to you once i am home and on laptop. ASD 4 ALL

9:13pm Sat 4 Jan 14

ASD 4 ALL says...

Would petitioning parliament work?
Would petitioning parliament work? ASD 4 ALL

9:35pm Sat 4 Jan 14

Owl sentinel says...

ASD 4 ALL wrote:
Would petitioning parliament work?
In my experience, emotional pleas do not achieve anything, and as we have seen just here, opinions are charged and allowed free rein when only using personal reasons. I have however found that the best advocacy seems to come from facts, evidence, stats, etc. the problem for me is that sometimes I don't know where to look and what data or forms to obtain. Once there is enough evidence and also the right questions to ask which challenge the way so called experts perform, then there is a chance to take it beyond feelings or opinions. There is an all party autism group in parliament, so yes that would be a great way of getting a platform and support. But it would be a wasted opportunity I think, if we do not do our groundwork. Because public bodies and special schools have legal teams and marketing consultants and management which would defeat us by manipulating and redefining legal duties, by the sheer authority of their status and assumed professionalism and knowledge, etc.
[quote][p][bold]ASD 4 ALL[/bold] wrote: Would petitioning parliament work?[/p][/quote]In my experience, emotional pleas do not achieve anything, and as we have seen just here, opinions are charged and allowed free rein when only using personal reasons. I have however found that the best advocacy seems to come from facts, evidence, stats, etc. the problem for me is that sometimes I don't know where to look and what data or forms to obtain. Once there is enough evidence and also the right questions to ask which challenge the way so called experts perform, then there is a chance to take it beyond feelings or opinions. There is an all party autism group in parliament, so yes that would be a great way of getting a platform and support. But it would be a wasted opportunity I think, if we do not do our groundwork. Because public bodies and special schools have legal teams and marketing consultants and management which would defeat us by manipulating and redefining legal duties, by the sheer authority of their status and assumed professionalism and knowledge, etc. Owl sentinel

12:33am Sun 5 Jan 14

Owl sentinel says...

Owl sentinel wrote:
ASD 4 ALL wrote:
Would petitioning parliament work?
In my experience, emotional pleas do not achieve anything, and as we have seen just here, opinions are charged and allowed free rein when only using personal reasons. I have however found that the best advocacy seems to come from facts, evidence, stats, etc. the problem for me is that sometimes I don't know where to look and what data or forms to obtain. Once there is enough evidence and also the right questions to ask which challenge the way so called experts perform, then there is a chance to take it beyond feelings or opinions. There is an all party autism group in parliament, so yes that would be a great way of getting a platform and support. But it would be a wasted opportunity I think, if we do not do our groundwork. Because public bodies and special schools have legal teams and marketing consultants and management which would defeat us by manipulating and redefining legal duties, by the sheer authority of their status and assumed professionalism and knowledge, etc.
If anyone reading this would like to ask their child's school a Freedom of Info request about their child and restraints, I will be creating a letter template, and supporting notes. All participants could download it and if they wanted to then pass on anonymous data from responses, I could collate it and use it to advocate for better safeguarding conditions for our children. If you like this idea, press thumbs up!
[quote][p][bold]Owl sentinel[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]ASD 4 ALL[/bold] wrote: Would petitioning parliament work?[/p][/quote]In my experience, emotional pleas do not achieve anything, and as we have seen just here, opinions are charged and allowed free rein when only using personal reasons. I have however found that the best advocacy seems to come from facts, evidence, stats, etc. the problem for me is that sometimes I don't know where to look and what data or forms to obtain. Once there is enough evidence and also the right questions to ask which challenge the way so called experts perform, then there is a chance to take it beyond feelings or opinions. There is an all party autism group in parliament, so yes that would be a great way of getting a platform and support. But it would be a wasted opportunity I think, if we do not do our groundwork. Because public bodies and special schools have legal teams and marketing consultants and management which would defeat us by manipulating and redefining legal duties, by the sheer authority of their status and assumed professionalism and knowledge, etc.[/p][/quote]If anyone reading this would like to ask their child's school a Freedom of Info request about their child and restraints, I will be creating a letter template, and supporting notes. All participants could download it and if they wanted to then pass on anonymous data from responses, I could collate it and use it to advocate for better safeguarding conditions for our children. If you like this idea, press thumbs up! Owl sentinel

3:55am Sun 5 Jan 14

mr.mark.c says...

Owl sentinel wrote:
mr.mark.c wrote:
Owl sentinel wrote:
mr.mark.c wrote:
The Education system works fine, the Autistic spectrum is very wide and nobody should expect special treatment for a single child in an SEB school.
Lever Park has 53 high school children, if a child gets very disruptive a teacher takes them home, if they get violent then they are restrained.
Looking at some comments on here some would want 53 teachers and it is not going to happen, live with it.
I remember a transport escort to the forwards centre being hit with a fire extinguisher and the child was restrained and no further action taken.
Take a moment to think about the staff and what they have to cope with before saying they have no right to restrain.
Your example about the fire extinguisher just shows that you or your colleagues did not understand the child - de escalation is not just about when there's an incident, it's everything that happens before. I've seen restraint records and one of the striking things about them is that staff think an antecedent is just a description of what happened.. Which it is not. There are many non confrontational ways to deal with incidents in the instance that the child's needs have not been recognised or supported. No restraint is safe and a child's development and emotional health are compromised too often.
So attacking another person is fine ?
No it isn't fine but you are missing the point, which is that the child's needs are not being met for this to occur. Children inherently are good and want to be accepted. A child with sensory processing and emotional regulation difficulties needs a lot of support, a child with social communication problems also needs a lot of support. But if you are not trained in these areas, then invariably you will over-use restraints. You really can't see it, so frustrating!
Take your own child to an from school then, I just cant see why the staff that work on transport should need qualifications.
And yes I see it but I deal with it.
[quote][p][bold]Owl sentinel[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]mr.mark.c[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Owl sentinel[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]mr.mark.c[/bold] wrote: The Education system works fine, the Autistic spectrum is very wide and nobody should expect special treatment for a single child in an SEB school. Lever Park has 53 high school children, if a child gets very disruptive a teacher takes them home, if they get violent then they are restrained. Looking at some comments on here some would want 53 teachers and it is not going to happen, live with it. I remember a transport escort to the forwards centre being hit with a fire extinguisher and the child was restrained and no further action taken. Take a moment to think about the staff and what they have to cope with before saying they have no right to restrain.[/p][/quote]Your example about the fire extinguisher just shows that you or your colleagues did not understand the child - de escalation is not just about when there's an incident, it's everything that happens before. I've seen restraint records and one of the striking things about them is that staff think an antecedent is just a description of what happened.. Which it is not. There are many non confrontational ways to deal with incidents in the instance that the child's needs have not been recognised or supported. No restraint is safe and a child's development and emotional health are compromised too often.[/p][/quote]So attacking another person is fine ?[/p][/quote]No it isn't fine but you are missing the point, which is that the child's needs are not being met for this to occur. Children inherently are good and want to be accepted. A child with sensory processing and emotional regulation difficulties needs a lot of support, a child with social communication problems also needs a lot of support. But if you are not trained in these areas, then invariably you will over-use restraints. You really can't see it, so frustrating![/p][/quote]Take your own child to an from school then, I just cant see why the staff that work on transport should need qualifications. And yes I see it but I deal with it. mr.mark.c

12:58pm Sun 5 Jan 14

Owl sentinel says...

mr.mark.c wrote:
Owl sentinel wrote:
mr.mark.c wrote:
Owl sentinel wrote:
mr.mark.c wrote:
The Education system works fine, the Autistic spectrum is very wide and nobody should expect special treatment for a single child in an SEB school.
Lever Park has 53 high school children, if a child gets very disruptive a teacher takes them home, if they get violent then they are restrained.
Looking at some comments on here some would want 53 teachers and it is not going to happen, live with it.
I remember a transport escort to the forwards centre being hit with a fire extinguisher and the child was restrained and no further action taken.
Take a moment to think about the staff and what they have to cope with before saying they have no right to restrain.
Your example about the fire extinguisher just shows that you or your colleagues did not understand the child - de escalation is not just about when there's an incident, it's everything that happens before. I've seen restraint records and one of the striking things about them is that staff think an antecedent is just a description of what happened.. Which it is not. There are many non confrontational ways to deal with incidents in the instance that the child's needs have not been recognised or supported. No restraint is safe and a child's development and emotional health are compromised too often.
So attacking another person is fine ?
No it isn't fine but you are missing the point, which is that the child's needs are not being met for this to occur. Children inherently are good and want to be accepted. A child with sensory processing and emotional regulation difficulties needs a lot of support, a child with social communication problems also needs a lot of support. But if you are not trained in these areas, then invariably you will over-use restraints. You really can't see it, so frustrating!
Take your own child to an from school then, I just cant see why the staff that work on transport should need qualifications.
And yes I see it but I deal with it.
I feel concerned for the children at your school!
[quote][p][bold]mr.mark.c[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Owl sentinel[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]mr.mark.c[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Owl sentinel[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]mr.mark.c[/bold] wrote: The Education system works fine, the Autistic spectrum is very wide and nobody should expect special treatment for a single child in an SEB school. Lever Park has 53 high school children, if a child gets very disruptive a teacher takes them home, if they get violent then they are restrained. Looking at some comments on here some would want 53 teachers and it is not going to happen, live with it. I remember a transport escort to the forwards centre being hit with a fire extinguisher and the child was restrained and no further action taken. Take a moment to think about the staff and what they have to cope with before saying they have no right to restrain.[/p][/quote]Your example about the fire extinguisher just shows that you or your colleagues did not understand the child - de escalation is not just about when there's an incident, it's everything that happens before. I've seen restraint records and one of the striking things about them is that staff think an antecedent is just a description of what happened.. Which it is not. There are many non confrontational ways to deal with incidents in the instance that the child's needs have not been recognised or supported. No restraint is safe and a child's development and emotional health are compromised too often.[/p][/quote]So attacking another person is fine ?[/p][/quote]No it isn't fine but you are missing the point, which is that the child's needs are not being met for this to occur. Children inherently are good and want to be accepted. A child with sensory processing and emotional regulation difficulties needs a lot of support, a child with social communication problems also needs a lot of support. But if you are not trained in these areas, then invariably you will over-use restraints. You really can't see it, so frustrating![/p][/quote]Take your own child to an from school then, I just cant see why the staff that work on transport should need qualifications. And yes I see it but I deal with it.[/p][/quote]I feel concerned for the children at your school! Owl sentinel

3:43am Mon 6 Jan 14

mr.mark.c says...

Owl sentinel wrote:
mr.mark.c wrote:
Owl sentinel wrote:
mr.mark.c wrote:
Owl sentinel wrote:
mr.mark.c wrote:
The Education system works fine, the Autistic spectrum is very wide and nobody should expect special treatment for a single child in an SEB school.
Lever Park has 53 high school children, if a child gets very disruptive a teacher takes them home, if they get violent then they are restrained.
Looking at some comments on here some would want 53 teachers and it is not going to happen, live with it.
I remember a transport escort to the forwards centre being hit with a fire extinguisher and the child was restrained and no further action taken.
Take a moment to think about the staff and what they have to cope with before saying they have no right to restrain.
Your example about the fire extinguisher just shows that you or your colleagues did not understand the child - de escalation is not just about when there's an incident, it's everything that happens before. I've seen restraint records and one of the striking things about them is that staff think an antecedent is just a description of what happened.. Which it is not. There are many non confrontational ways to deal with incidents in the instance that the child's needs have not been recognised or supported. No restraint is safe and a child's development and emotional health are compromised too often.
So attacking another person is fine ?
No it isn't fine but you are missing the point, which is that the child's needs are not being met for this to occur. Children inherently are good and want to be accepted. A child with sensory processing and emotional regulation difficulties needs a lot of support, a child with social communication problems also needs a lot of support. But if you are not trained in these areas, then invariably you will over-use restraints. You really can't see it, so frustrating!
Take your own child to an from school then, I just cant see why the staff that work on transport should need qualifications.
And yes I see it but I deal with it.
I feel concerned for the children at your school!
Awwww little Johnny is beating the dung out of little Carl is not good enough, some kids need to be restrained for their safety and for that of the other children and staff.
Take the blinkers off,
[quote][p][bold]Owl sentinel[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]mr.mark.c[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Owl sentinel[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]mr.mark.c[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Owl sentinel[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]mr.mark.c[/bold] wrote: The Education system works fine, the Autistic spectrum is very wide and nobody should expect special treatment for a single child in an SEB school. Lever Park has 53 high school children, if a child gets very disruptive a teacher takes them home, if they get violent then they are restrained. Looking at some comments on here some would want 53 teachers and it is not going to happen, live with it. I remember a transport escort to the forwards centre being hit with a fire extinguisher and the child was restrained and no further action taken. Take a moment to think about the staff and what they have to cope with before saying they have no right to restrain.[/p][/quote]Your example about the fire extinguisher just shows that you or your colleagues did not understand the child - de escalation is not just about when there's an incident, it's everything that happens before. I've seen restraint records and one of the striking things about them is that staff think an antecedent is just a description of what happened.. Which it is not. There are many non confrontational ways to deal with incidents in the instance that the child's needs have not been recognised or supported. No restraint is safe and a child's development and emotional health are compromised too often.[/p][/quote]So attacking another person is fine ?[/p][/quote]No it isn't fine but you are missing the point, which is that the child's needs are not being met for this to occur. Children inherently are good and want to be accepted. A child with sensory processing and emotional regulation difficulties needs a lot of support, a child with social communication problems also needs a lot of support. But if you are not trained in these areas, then invariably you will over-use restraints. You really can't see it, so frustrating![/p][/quote]Take your own child to an from school then, I just cant see why the staff that work on transport should need qualifications. And yes I see it but I deal with it.[/p][/quote]I feel concerned for the children at your school![/p][/quote]Awwww little Johnny is beating the dung out of little Carl is not good enough, some kids need to be restrained for their safety and for that of the other children and staff. Take the blinkers off, mr.mark.c

10:37am Mon 6 Jan 14

Aspie-Ambassador says...

mr.mark.c wrote:
Owl sentinel wrote:
mr.mark.c wrote:
Owl sentinel wrote:
mr.mark.c wrote:
Owl sentinel wrote:
mr.mark.c wrote:
The Education system works fine, the Autistic spectrum is very wide and nobody should expect special treatment for a single child in an SEB school.
Lever Park has 53 high school children, if a child gets very disruptive a teacher takes them home, if they get violent then they are restrained.
Looking at some comments on here some would want 53 teachers and it is not going to happen, live with it.
I remember a transport escort to the forwards centre being hit with a fire extinguisher and the child was restrained and no further action taken.
Take a moment to think about the staff and what they have to cope with before saying they have no right to restrain.
Your example about the fire extinguisher just shows that you or your colleagues did not understand the child - de escalation is not just about when there's an incident, it's everything that happens before. I've seen restraint records and one of the striking things about them is that staff think an antecedent is just a description of what happened.. Which it is not. There are many non confrontational ways to deal with incidents in the instance that the child's needs have not been recognised or supported. No restraint is safe and a child's development and emotional health are compromised too often.
So attacking another person is fine ?
No it isn't fine but you are missing the point, which is that the child's needs are not being met for this to occur. Children inherently are good and want to be accepted. A child with sensory processing and emotional regulation difficulties needs a lot of support, a child with social communication problems also needs a lot of support. But if you are not trained in these areas, then invariably you will over-use restraints. You really can't see it, so frustrating!
Take your own child to an from school then, I just cant see why the staff that work on transport should need qualifications.
And yes I see it but I deal with it.
I feel concerned for the children at your school!
Awwww little Johnny is beating the dung out of little Carl is not good enough, some kids need to be restrained for their safety and for that of the other children and staff.
Take the blinkers off,
Seeing ur true colours now
aren't we!
[quote][p][bold]mr.mark.c[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Owl sentinel[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]mr.mark.c[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Owl sentinel[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]mr.mark.c[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Owl sentinel[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]mr.mark.c[/bold] wrote: The Education system works fine, the Autistic spectrum is very wide and nobody should expect special treatment for a single child in an SEB school. Lever Park has 53 high school children, if a child gets very disruptive a teacher takes them home, if they get violent then they are restrained. Looking at some comments on here some would want 53 teachers and it is not going to happen, live with it. I remember a transport escort to the forwards centre being hit with a fire extinguisher and the child was restrained and no further action taken. Take a moment to think about the staff and what they have to cope with before saying they have no right to restrain.[/p][/quote]Your example about the fire extinguisher just shows that you or your colleagues did not understand the child - de escalation is not just about when there's an incident, it's everything that happens before. I've seen restraint records and one of the striking things about them is that staff think an antecedent is just a description of what happened.. Which it is not. There are many non confrontational ways to deal with incidents in the instance that the child's needs have not been recognised or supported. No restraint is safe and a child's development and emotional health are compromised too often.[/p][/quote]So attacking another person is fine ?[/p][/quote]No it isn't fine but you are missing the point, which is that the child's needs are not being met for this to occur. Children inherently are good and want to be accepted. A child with sensory processing and emotional regulation difficulties needs a lot of support, a child with social communication problems also needs a lot of support. But if you are not trained in these areas, then invariably you will over-use restraints. You really can't see it, so frustrating![/p][/quote]Take your own child to an from school then, I just cant see why the staff that work on transport should need qualifications. And yes I see it but I deal with it.[/p][/quote]I feel concerned for the children at your school![/p][/quote]Awwww little Johnny is beating the dung out of little Carl is not good enough, some kids need to be restrained for their safety and for that of the other children and staff. Take the blinkers off,[/p][/quote]Seeing ur true colours now aren't we! Aspie-Ambassador

1:49am Tue 7 Jan 14

mr.mark.c says...

Aspie-Ambassador wrote:
mr.mark.c wrote:
Owl sentinel wrote:
mr.mark.c wrote:
Owl sentinel wrote:
mr.mark.c wrote:
Owl sentinel wrote:
mr.mark.c wrote:
The Education system works fine, the Autistic spectrum is very wide and nobody should expect special treatment for a single child in an SEB school.
Lever Park has 53 high school children, if a child gets very disruptive a teacher takes them home, if they get violent then they are restrained.
Looking at some comments on here some would want 53 teachers and it is not going to happen, live with it.
I remember a transport escort to the forwards centre being hit with a fire extinguisher and the child was restrained and no further action taken.
Take a moment to think about the staff and what they have to cope with before saying they have no right to restrain.
Your example about the fire extinguisher just shows that you or your colleagues did not understand the child - de escalation is not just about when there's an incident, it's everything that happens before. I've seen restraint records and one of the striking things about them is that staff think an antecedent is just a description of what happened.. Which it is not. There are many non confrontational ways to deal with incidents in the instance that the child's needs have not been recognised or supported. No restraint is safe and a child's development and emotional health are compromised too often.
So attacking another person is fine ?
No it isn't fine but you are missing the point, which is that the child's needs are not being met for this to occur. Children inherently are good and want to be accepted. A child with sensory processing and emotional regulation difficulties needs a lot of support, a child with social communication problems also needs a lot of support. But if you are not trained in these areas, then invariably you will over-use restraints. You really can't see it, so frustrating!
Take your own child to an from school then, I just cant see why the staff that work on transport should need qualifications.
And yes I see it but I deal with it.
I feel concerned for the children at your school!
Awwww little Johnny is beating the dung out of little Carl is not good enough, some kids need to be restrained for their safety and for that of the other children and staff.
Take the blinkers off,
Seeing ur true colours now
aren't we!
I would say it shows your ignorance to the real world.
Are you actually an Ambassador for the NAS? or is it a fantasy name?
[quote][p][bold]Aspie-Ambassador[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]mr.mark.c[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Owl sentinel[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]mr.mark.c[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Owl sentinel[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]mr.mark.c[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Owl sentinel[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]mr.mark.c[/bold] wrote: The Education system works fine, the Autistic spectrum is very wide and nobody should expect special treatment for a single child in an SEB school. Lever Park has 53 high school children, if a child gets very disruptive a teacher takes them home, if they get violent then they are restrained. Looking at some comments on here some would want 53 teachers and it is not going to happen, live with it. I remember a transport escort to the forwards centre being hit with a fire extinguisher and the child was restrained and no further action taken. Take a moment to think about the staff and what they have to cope with before saying they have no right to restrain.[/p][/quote]Your example about the fire extinguisher just shows that you or your colleagues did not understand the child - de escalation is not just about when there's an incident, it's everything that happens before. I've seen restraint records and one of the striking things about them is that staff think an antecedent is just a description of what happened.. Which it is not. There are many non confrontational ways to deal with incidents in the instance that the child's needs have not been recognised or supported. No restraint is safe and a child's development and emotional health are compromised too often.[/p][/quote]So attacking another person is fine ?[/p][/quote]No it isn't fine but you are missing the point, which is that the child's needs are not being met for this to occur. Children inherently are good and want to be accepted. A child with sensory processing and emotional regulation difficulties needs a lot of support, a child with social communication problems also needs a lot of support. But if you are not trained in these areas, then invariably you will over-use restraints. You really can't see it, so frustrating![/p][/quote]Take your own child to an from school then, I just cant see why the staff that work on transport should need qualifications. And yes I see it but I deal with it.[/p][/quote]I feel concerned for the children at your school![/p][/quote]Awwww little Johnny is beating the dung out of little Carl is not good enough, some kids need to be restrained for their safety and for that of the other children and staff. Take the blinkers off,[/p][/quote]Seeing ur true colours now aren't we![/p][/quote]I would say it shows your ignorance to the real world. Are you actually an Ambassador for the NAS? or is it a fantasy name? mr.mark.c

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