New Royal Bolton Hospital boss could earn £200,000 per year

The Bolton News: The Royal Bolton Hospital The Royal Bolton Hospital

THE search is on for the Royal Bolton Hospital’s next boss — and the right candidate could receive a salary of up to £200,000 a year.

The Bolton NHS Foundation Trust, which runs the hospital, is looking for an “inspirational leader” to take on the role of chief executive, according to an advert on the NHS Jobs website.

Jackie Bene has been acting chief executive after Kevin McGee announced he would not be taking over at the last minute.

Mr McGee is chief executive of Nuneaton’s George Eliot Hospital and decided to remain his existing post after it was announced the trust’s services would be franchised.

The appointment of a permanent chief will mark the end of a turbulent 12 months for the trust, which has been dogged by investigations into patient coding, A&E performance and the hospital’s finances.

Heather Edwards, head of communications at the trust, said: “As planned, we are now advertising for the chief executive post and hope to make an appointment early in the new year.”

The pay bracket for the post will be between £140,000 and £200,000, depending on experience.

Former chief executive Lesley Doherty, who took early retirement in 2012, earned between £140,000 and £145,000 a year. It is not known whether Dr Bene will apply for the job but there is thought to be widespread support for the acting chief executive.


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Harry Hanley, secretary of Staff Side at the Royal Bolton, said: “I hope Jackie Bene has applied because I think she is the right person for the job.

“We know she’s passionate about the trust and the NHS. Perhaps she is a little inexperienced as a chief executive but I know people have got a lot of respect for her at the hospital.

“I definitely think Bolton has reputation for being a challenging trust and whoever gets the job, it’s going to take a special kind of person to take it on.”

The job specification states the right candidate faces the challenge of improving the quality of care while responding to the “significant” issues posed by restricted finances.

Andy Morgan, who sits on the health scrutiny committee, said: “The trust has needed someone permanent at the helm for a long time, although I am little surprised at the level of the remuneration package as this is more than the Prime Minister gets to run the country.”

Dr Bene stepped down as acting chief executive in February to allow an independent investigation of coding, after health research group Dr Foster found “significant discrepancies” in data.

She returned as medical director — a position she has held for several years — after interim findings from a second investigation, into clinical coding, showed that there had been no manipulation of data.

She later stepped in again as acting chief executive when Mr McGee turned down the job in July.

Dr Bene has often been described by chairman of the trust, David Wakefield, as a “real star” of the hospital.

Comments (5)

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11:11am Fri 10 Jan 14

Rememberscarborough says...

The "right" candidate would have to be able to produce miracles to turn around all the mis-management by their predecessors. IF they can do this then they'd be worth double that salary but I doubt there's a boss in the country that would be able to work that miracle...
The "right" candidate would have to be able to produce miracles to turn around all the mis-management by their predecessors. IF they can do this then they'd be worth double that salary but I doubt there's a boss in the country that would be able to work that miracle... Rememberscarborough

1:18pm Fri 10 Jan 14

Balboa says...

Problem is the post will go to someone with NHS and public sector running through their veins, with little genuine ability or vision, and will simply spout off statistics and performance standards we already are aware of.

Privatise the lot.
Problem is the post will go to someone with NHS and public sector running through their veins, with little genuine ability or vision, and will simply spout off statistics and performance standards we already are aware of. Privatise the lot. Balboa

2:39pm Fri 10 Jan 14

Iluminati says...

The right candidate must be good with fiddling figures, and should have a second job lined up after eventually resigning with a handsome pay off.
These are standard criteria amongst the Health Chiefs and have been applied many times before, and will be applied many times after.
The right candidate must be good with fiddling figures, and should have a second job lined up after eventually resigning with a handsome pay off. These are standard criteria amongst the Health Chiefs and have been applied many times before, and will be applied many times after. Iluminati

9:06am Sat 11 Jan 14

Justme64 says...

Disgusting renumeration package when so many have been made redundant. The Trust has survived its worst attack from this godforsaken government - staff morale is very low with good people who have been made redundant and services starved of cash. If they don't appoint a CE then they will save the £200,000..... If it is good enough to run other Departments in this way then why not this one!!!
Disgusting renumeration package when so many have been made redundant. The Trust has survived its worst attack from this godforsaken government - staff morale is very low with good people who have been made redundant and services starved of cash. If they don't appoint a CE then they will save the £200,000..... If it is good enough to run other Departments in this way then why not this one!!! Justme64

10:25am Sat 11 Jan 14

Puffin-Billy says...

Harry Hanley, secretary of Staff Side at the Royal Bolton Hospital, ought to know better.

Instead of going along with this charade, which is also taking place in every other NHS Hospital in the country, he should be actively fighting this government's, and the Labour government's privatisation=destru
ction of the NHS.

Andy Morgan sheds crocodile tears for the NHS on an almost daily basis in the BN. He has a financial vested interest in private healthcare, like almost everyone else in the Conservative Party and , and thus in the privatisation = destruction of the NHS.

If anyone is in any doubt as to the intentions of the Conservative party for the NHS, they should know that the health secretary, Jeremy Hunt, has co-authored a book that describes the NHS as a '60-year-old mistake'.

Andy Morgan should not be sitting on the Bolton's Health Scrutiny Committee. He is a danger to the NHS, and to the health of the people of Bolton. He claims: " I am a little surprised at the level of the remuneration package...".

He knows very well that it is the size of the remuneration package which will ensure that the wishes of the Conservative Party, which are those of Monitor, McKinsey, and the Nuffield Trust are carried out.

I quote the Nuffield Trust website:
1. " NHS reorganisation: Creation of an internal market is facilitated through the National Health Service and Community Care Act 1990".

2. " NHS Chief Executive Sir David Nicholson, warns the NHS to prepare for the need to release unprecedented efficiency savings of between £15 billion and £20 billion between 2011 and 2014."

Sir David Nicholson, the chief executive of the NHS was grilled about revelations that at least 52 staff have been silenced by law and handed £2million in secret severance payments.

Unlike other payoffs to gag health workers – of which hundreds have been handed out in recent years – the so-called judicial mediation deals were agreed by hospital trusts without Treasury or Department of Health scrutiny.

One for £500,000 was handed to whistleblower Gary Walker, the former head of United Lincolnshire Hospital NHS Trust, where hundreds of patients are feared to have died.

No member or supporter of the Conservative Party be allowed to sit on any body which has to do with the survival of the NHS, either in Bolton or anywhere else in England - they are enemies of the people and of the NHS.

The "right person for the job" is the one who will carry out Monitor's, the Nuffield Trusts, McKinsey's and this government's wishes.

The right person for the job will not criticise or question the fact that, amongst other things, over 5000 nurses have been sacked by this government in order to make way for "privatisation compliant" third world cheap, and poorly qualified labour, and poorly aid agency staff.

The right person for the job will not criticise or call into question the fact that NHS Bolton has a "...reputation for being a challenging trust..." precisely because it is under strain from the £20 BILLION pounds worth of CUTS not "Savings" imposed on it by this government's compliance with MCkinsey's advice.

Its president, Jeffrey Skilling, now serving a 24-year jail sentence for fraud, is a McKinsey alumnus. McKinsey is nonetheless worth more than £4billion, and its clients, according to Business Week, have included 15 of the world’s 22 largest healthcare and drugs firms.

Last year a McKinsey team led by Mr Henke advised McKesson, the world’s biggest private healthcare provider, when it took over System C, an IT firm working for the NHS.

McKinsey worked closely with the last Labour Government on health, and produced a 2009 report recommending the NHS cut ten per cent of its staff. But within days of the Coalition taking office in 2010, it was seizing opportunities on an unprecedented scale. Its first ‘strategy’ contract with Monitor, worth £330,000, was signed just 48 hours after the Coalition agreement on May 12.

The following week, Mr Lansley’s health department awarded the firm work worth a further £6million for ‘services to the NHS Leadership team’, while a company representative would attend meetings involving members of that team.

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!Final
ly, here is at least one good reason why we should be fighting to destroy the Health and Social Care Act.2013.!!!!!!!!!!!
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
!!
These are the word of a GP..

"It's been an amazing privilege working as a family doctor. I am trusted with the long-term care and health of sometimes four generations, and I have tried to help with their most intimate and complex problems, sometimes shared only with me. It's the best job in medicine, and the NHS was the best place to practice.

So why am I retiring early? Because for several years I've fought the dismantling of the founding principles of Bevan's NHS and on 1 April I lost. That was the day the main provisions of the Health and Social Care Act 2012 came into effect. On Wednesday night, a last-gasp attempt in the House of Lords to annul the part pushing competitive tendering sadly failed.

The democratic and legal basis of the English NHS and the secretary of state's duty to provide comprehensive health services have now gone, and the framework that allows for wholesale privatisation of the planning, organisation, supply, finance and distribution of our health care is now in place. Since 1948, we GPs have been our patient's advocate, championing the care we judge is needed clinically.

Everyone necessary for that care co-operated for the good of the patient – they didn't compete for the benefit of shareholders. Sadly, patients are now right to be suspicious of motives concerning decisions made about them, which until recently, almost uniquely in the world, have been purely in their best clinical interest. Most politicians understand little about general practice, have no idea about the importance of continuity of care and blame GPs for a rise in hospital work, even though this is a direct result of their policies.

I believe patient choice is an illusion as I am restricted in terms of where I can refer and what treatments I can use. GPs are now expected to collude with rationing, are sent incomprehensible financial spreadsheets telling us our "activity levels" are too high and in some areas are prevented from speaking out about this, despite the government's weasel words about duty of candour after Mid Staffs. Practices are already being solicited by private companies touting for business, often connected to members of my own profession. But the lie that GPs are now in control of the money will soon be exposed. Most services are to go out to tender, which will paralyse decision-making.

Now your doctor, the hospital, your specialist or the employing company has a financial incentive built into the clinical decision-making – even whether or not you are seen at all. Your referral may be to a related company, with both profiting from your care – so was that operation, procedure or investigation really in your best clinical interest? Or you may be told a service is now no longer available. The jargon used is that "we are not commissioned for that". But you can pay. The elephant in the consulting room is the ethical implication of private medicine. In my 30 years as an NHS GP, some of the most disastrously treated patients are those who elected for private care. Decisions were made about them for the wrong reasons, namely profit. Patients are rarely aware of this.

The politicians who drive this unnecessary revolution claim the NHS is not being privatised because it is still free at the point of use. This is duplicitous as the two are not connected. They are ignorant or dismissive of the founding principles of the NHS which include it being universal and comprehensive – both of which have gone. The NHS logo appears on all sorts of private company buildings and notepaper which is one reason patients haven't noticed the change yet. Just leaving "free at the point of use" under an NHS kitemark doesn't constitute a national health service. It's now one small step to insurance companies picking up the bill (but obviously profiting from it) rather than the state. An Americanised system run by many US companies. The end of a "60-year-old mistake", as Jeremy Hunt once co-authored.

I am proud to have been an NHS GP. I believe the way a society delivers its healthcare defines the values and nature of that society. In the US, healthcare is not primarily about looking after the nation's health but a huge multi-company, money-making machine which makes some people extremely rich but neglects millions of its citizens. We are being dragged into that machine and I want no part in it.

The politicians responsible for this must live with their consciences, as it is the greatest failure of democracy in my lifetime."
Harry Hanley, secretary of Staff Side at the Royal Bolton Hospital, ought to know better. Instead of going along with this charade, which is also taking place in every other NHS Hospital in the country, he should be actively fighting this government's, and the Labour government's privatisation=destru ction of the NHS. Andy Morgan sheds crocodile tears for the NHS on an almost daily basis in the BN. He has a financial vested interest in private healthcare, like almost everyone else in the Conservative Party and , and thus in the privatisation = destruction of the NHS. If anyone is in any doubt as to the intentions of the Conservative party for the NHS, they should know that the health secretary, Jeremy Hunt, has co-authored a book that describes the NHS as a '60-year-old mistake'. Andy Morgan should not be sitting on the Bolton's Health Scrutiny Committee. He is a danger to the NHS, and to the health of the people of Bolton. He claims: " I am a little surprised at the level of the remuneration package...". He knows very well that it is the size of the remuneration package which will ensure that the wishes of the Conservative Party, which are those of Monitor, McKinsey, and the Nuffield Trust are carried out. I quote the Nuffield Trust website: 1. " NHS reorganisation: Creation of an internal market is facilitated through the National Health Service and Community Care Act 1990". 2. " NHS Chief Executive Sir David Nicholson, warns the NHS to prepare for the need to release unprecedented efficiency savings of between £15 billion and £20 billion between 2011 and 2014." Sir David Nicholson, the chief executive of the NHS was grilled about revelations that at least 52 staff have been silenced by law and handed £2million in secret severance payments. Unlike other payoffs to gag health workers – of which hundreds have been handed out in recent years – the so-called judicial mediation deals were agreed by hospital trusts without Treasury or Department of Health scrutiny. One for £500,000 was handed to whistleblower Gary Walker, the former head of United Lincolnshire Hospital NHS Trust, where hundreds of patients are feared to have died. No member or supporter of the Conservative Party be allowed to sit on any body which has to do with the survival of the NHS, either in Bolton or anywhere else in England - they are enemies of the people and of the NHS. The "right person for the job" is the one who will carry out Monitor's, the Nuffield Trusts, McKinsey's and this government's wishes. The right person for the job will not criticise or question the fact that, amongst other things, over 5000 nurses have been sacked by this government in order to make way for "privatisation compliant" third world cheap, and poorly qualified labour, and poorly aid agency staff. The right person for the job will not criticise or call into question the fact that NHS Bolton has a "...reputation for being a challenging trust..." precisely because it is under strain from the £20 BILLION pounds worth of CUTS not "Savings" imposed on it by this government's compliance with MCkinsey's advice. Its president, Jeffrey Skilling, now serving a 24-year jail sentence for fraud, is a McKinsey alumnus. McKinsey is nonetheless worth more than £4billion, and its clients, according to Business Week, have included 15 of the world’s 22 largest healthcare and drugs firms. Last year a McKinsey team led by Mr Henke advised McKesson, the world’s biggest private healthcare provider, when it took over System C, an IT firm working for the NHS. McKinsey worked closely with the last Labour Government on health, and produced a 2009 report recommending the NHS cut ten per cent of its staff. But within days of the Coalition taking office in 2010, it was seizing opportunities on an unprecedented scale. Its first ‘strategy’ contract with Monitor, worth £330,000, was signed just 48 hours after the Coalition agreement on May 12. The following week, Mr Lansley’s health department awarded the firm work worth a further £6million for ‘services to the NHS Leadership team’, while a company representative would attend meetings involving members of that team. !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!Final ly, here is at least one good reason why we should be fighting to destroy the Health and Social Care Act.2013.!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !! These are the word of a GP.. "It's been an amazing privilege working as a family doctor. I am trusted with the long-term care and health of sometimes four generations, and I have tried to help with their most intimate and complex problems, sometimes shared only with me. It's the best job in medicine, and the NHS was the best place to practice. So why am I retiring early? Because for several years I've fought the dismantling of the founding principles of Bevan's NHS and on 1 April I lost. That was the day the main provisions of the Health and Social Care Act 2012 came into effect. On Wednesday night, a last-gasp attempt in the House of Lords to annul the part pushing competitive tendering sadly failed. The democratic and legal basis of the English NHS and the secretary of state's duty to provide comprehensive health services have now gone, and the framework that allows for wholesale privatisation of the planning, organisation, supply, finance and distribution of our health care is now in place. Since 1948, we GPs have been our patient's advocate, championing the care we judge is needed clinically. Everyone necessary for that care co-operated for the good of the patient – they didn't compete for the benefit of shareholders. Sadly, patients are now right to be suspicious of motives concerning decisions made about them, which until recently, almost uniquely in the world, have been purely in their best clinical interest. Most politicians understand little about general practice, have no idea about the importance of continuity of care and blame GPs for a rise in hospital work, even though this is a direct result of their policies. I believe patient choice is an illusion as I am restricted in terms of where I can refer and what treatments I can use. GPs are now expected to collude with rationing, are sent incomprehensible financial spreadsheets telling us our "activity levels" are too high and in some areas are prevented from speaking out about this, despite the government's weasel words about duty of candour after Mid Staffs. Practices are already being solicited by private companies touting for business, often connected to members of my own profession. But the lie that GPs are now in control of the money will soon be exposed. Most services are to go out to tender, which will paralyse decision-making. Now your doctor, the hospital, your specialist or the employing company has a financial incentive built into the clinical decision-making – even whether or not you are seen at all. Your referral may be to a related company, with both profiting from your care – so was that operation, procedure or investigation really in your best clinical interest? Or you may be told a service is now no longer available. The jargon used is that "we are not commissioned for that". But you can pay. The elephant in the consulting room is the ethical implication of private medicine. In my 30 years as an NHS GP, some of the most disastrously treated patients are those who elected for private care. Decisions were made about them for the wrong reasons, namely profit. Patients are rarely aware of this. The politicians who drive this unnecessary revolution claim the NHS is not being privatised because it is still free at the point of use. This is duplicitous as the two are not connected. They are ignorant or dismissive of the founding principles of the NHS which include it being universal and comprehensive – both of which have gone. The NHS logo appears on all sorts of private company buildings and notepaper which is one reason patients haven't noticed the change yet. Just leaving "free at the point of use" under an NHS kitemark doesn't constitute a national health service. It's now one small step to insurance companies picking up the bill (but obviously profiting from it) rather than the state. An Americanised system run by many US companies. The end of a "60-year-old mistake", as Jeremy Hunt once co-authored. I am proud to have been an NHS GP. I believe the way a society delivers its healthcare defines the values and nature of that society. In the US, healthcare is not primarily about looking after the nation's health but a huge multi-company, money-making machine which makes some people extremely rich but neglects millions of its citizens. We are being dragged into that machine and I want no part in it. The politicians responsible for this must live with their consciences, as it is the greatest failure of democracy in my lifetime." Puffin-Billy

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