St Anne's Turton Brownies celebrate 60th anniversary at Edgworth Primary School

The Bolton News: Current and former Brownies and Owls from 10th Bolton (St Anne’s Turton) at the pack’s 60th anniversary Current and former Brownies and Owls from 10th Bolton (St Anne’s Turton) at the pack’s 60th anniversary

BROWNIES young and old were brought together when the 10th Bolton (St Anne’s Turton) pack celebrated its 60th birthday.

They marked the milestone with an open evening at Turton and Edgworth CE Primary School in Bolton Road, Edgworth.

The event featured log books and photos from the 1980s, slide shows of recent activities, and a question and answer session involving current and previous Brownies.

About 30 people attended, including eight former Owls, Brownies from the 1960s and Sue Wilson, who was Brown Owl of the pack for 25 years. Mrs Wilson, aged 66, of Moorfield, Turton, retired as leader two years ago and is now assistant with the group.

She said: “The open evening was great fun.

“Everyone was saying how much they enjoyed it and the former Brownies have promised to get together again. People who hadn’t met up in years were even taking each other home — it was great to see.

“The younger Brownies were very keen to ask the older ones questions and the former Brownies were very intrigued by the new outfits. All in all, it was a big success.” Mrs Wilson’s successor Debbie Knight, aged 51, of Thomason Fold, Edgworth, added: “It was fantastic to see so many people.

“Some of the former Brownies were saying it’s not as strict as it used to be.

“The girls showed great enthusiasm and we hope they will take the Brownies’ values with them in life, whatever they do.”

Girlguiding Lancashire Border County Commissioner Sue Smart and Division Commissioner for Bolton Tonge Helen Green were also at the get-together.

The 10th Bolton (St Anne’s Turton) Brownie Park meets every Tuesday at the school.

This year marks the centenary of the Brownies, formed by Lord Baden-Powell, as girls sought their own version of the Scouts.

They were originally called the Rosebuds.

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