They don't give Atos: campaigners protest against disability assessors

The Bolton News: Julie Hilling backs the protest against Atos Julie Hilling backs the protest against Atos

CAMPAIGNERS were met by Bolton West MP Julie Hilling as they protested against disability assessors Atos outside their offices.

Members of Unite and Bolton Against the Bedroom Tax handed out hundreds of leaflets by the Octagon car park as part of a national campaign calling on the government to stop work capability assessments and end their association with Atos.

The company has come under fire for its role in assessing people who are receiving Employment and Support Allowance (ESA) and Incapacity Benefit by critics, who say they have needlessly stripped millions of vulnerable people of much-needed benefits and forced them into work.

Ms Hilling gave a speech to protesters and passers-by, saying she would continue to press the government to end “unfair discrimination” against the disabled and vulnerable.

She added: “We have got to say to Atos, the Department for Work and Pensions and our government to stop harming ordinary people who are trying to live their lives in dignity, and not be driven mad and put into terrible circumstances.

“What they are doing is cruel, inhuman and should not be happening in a civilised society.”

One of the demonstrators Janette Jones, aged 50, was told she was fit to work by Atos, despite suffering from crippling depression that made every-day social encounters unbearable.

It meant she could no longer receive ESA, and her benefits went down £100 to £70 a week.

Ms Jones, from Horwich, said: “I waited nine months for an appeal, and when the tribunal started it should have lasted 30 minutes — it only took 10 minutes.

“The whole thing was awful. Atos work on a quota system and it needs to stop — I felt like I was destined to fail the test.

“But I’m one of the lucky ones.”

Comments (19)

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12:56pm Thu 20 Feb 14

Tim Burr says...

So despite suffering depression that (I assume) in her own words "social encounters are unbearable" Ms Jones can have her photo taken and attend a demo, presumably because she feels strongly that ATOS are discriminating. Anybody else see the glaring hypocrisy here?

I don't think ATOS have got it right in many instances and if they work on quotas-that is wrong. I understand there are many thousands who 'voluntarily' came off DLA once they realised they were being scrutinised - that should tell us something about the previous system, which saw over a million become a part of Gordon Brown's propaganda machine and were moved onto permanent DLA, effectively extinguishing any hope or aspirations many may well have had - that was evil and immoral but Unison and others including Julie Hilling were and still are silent about.
So despite suffering depression that (I assume) in her own words "social encounters are unbearable" Ms Jones can have her photo taken and attend a demo, presumably because she feels strongly that ATOS are discriminating. Anybody else see the glaring hypocrisy here? I don't think ATOS have got it right in many instances and if they work on quotas-that is wrong. I understand there are many thousands who 'voluntarily' came off DLA once they realised they were being scrutinised - that should tell us something about the previous system, which saw over a million become a part of Gordon Brown's propaganda machine and were moved onto permanent DLA, effectively extinguishing any hope or aspirations many may well have had - that was evil and immoral but Unison and others including Julie Hilling were and still are silent about. Tim Burr
  • Score: -1

1:14pm Thu 20 Feb 14

cliff4treasurer says...

Agreed.
Agreed. cliff4treasurer
  • Score: -2

1:41pm Thu 20 Feb 14

Jim271 says...

How disabled does a person have to be, to be unable to sit at a desk and answer a telephone?
How disabled does a person have to be, to be unable to sit at a desk and answer a telephone? Jim271
  • Score: -5

1:59pm Thu 20 Feb 14

Anopheles says...

I know Mrs Jones and can tell you that her problems with social interactions involve struggling when some form of relationship has formed. She can seem quite 'normal' when she first encounters a person or group, but when it gets past that stage she suffers crippling anxiety, paranoia and depressions. Her emotions always seem to run 'at 11' and have led to several hospitalizations. when she has tried coping with employment.

She also suffers from Bipolar Depression (not ordinary depression).

Please don't allow the full facts to get in the way of your condescension and lack of empathy.
I know Mrs Jones and can tell you that her problems with social interactions involve struggling when some form of relationship has formed. She can seem quite 'normal' when she first encounters a person or group, but when it gets past that stage she suffers crippling anxiety, paranoia and depressions. Her emotions always seem to run 'at 11' and have led to several hospitalizations. when she has tried coping with employment. She also suffers from Bipolar Depression (not ordinary depression). Please don't allow the full facts to get in the way of your condescension and lack of empathy. Anopheles
  • Score: 10

2:15pm Thu 20 Feb 14

Tim Burr says...

The thing is Jim, many disabled would love to work - it's morons like Hilling and her supporters who carry the mindset they can't or won't.

Depression, granted a debilitating illness in it's worse forms and manifestations is the new bad back excuse. I'm tired of reading story's from alleged depressives complaining about ATOS, the bedroom tax and so on giving interviews as to how awful the Government treats them. If they got out more instead of isolating themselves because they don't want to miss a Facebook comment or spend all day locked in a room playing computer games as many do - their depression would soon lift with human interaction.
Granted there are some who are ill - seriously ill with mental health issues and those as with other genuine conditions we should have a safety net but a large number of these so called protesters are work-shy scroungers who play the system thinking we owe them everything - including motability BMW X1's (with a small contribution from the lessee.)

If these people want to see depressed people, let them volunteer to work with many pensioners whose lives are torn apart because they never see or speak to others, then they all benefit.
The thing is Jim, many disabled would love to work - it's morons like Hilling and her supporters who carry the mindset they can't or won't. Depression, granted a debilitating illness in it's worse forms and manifestations is the new bad back excuse. I'm tired of reading story's from alleged depressives complaining about ATOS, the bedroom tax and so on giving interviews as to how awful the Government treats them. If they got out more instead of isolating themselves because they don't want to miss a Facebook comment or spend all day locked in a room playing computer games as many do - their depression would soon lift with human interaction. Granted there are some who are ill - seriously ill with mental health issues and those as with other genuine conditions we should have a safety net but a large number of these so called protesters are work-shy scroungers who play the system thinking we owe them everything - including motability BMW X1's (with a small contribution from the lessee.) If these people want to see depressed people, let them volunteer to work with many pensioners whose lives are torn apart because they never see or speak to others, then they all benefit. Tim Burr
  • Score: -9

2:31pm Thu 20 Feb 14

Tim Burr says...

Anopheles wrote:
I know Mrs Jones and can tell you that her problems with social interactions involve struggling when some form of relationship has formed. She can seem quite 'normal' when she first encounters a person or group, but when it gets past that stage she suffers crippling anxiety, paranoia and depressions. Her emotions always seem to run 'at 11' and have led to several hospitalizations. when she has tried coping with employment.

She also suffers from Bipolar Depression (not ordinary depression).

Please don't allow the full facts to get in the way of your condescension and lack of empathy.
Bipolar disorder is treated with medication and therapies very successfully, it doesn't stop you working forever unless you want it to - i.e. use it as an excuse.
All the 'symptoms' you mention are all associated with Bipolar disorder - she isn't special in having this condition, many suffer the same and lead to the best of their ability, normal lives. The most famous example being the multi- millionaire and in demand Stephen Fry.
[quote][p][bold]Anopheles[/bold] wrote: I know Mrs Jones and can tell you that her problems with social interactions involve struggling when some form of relationship has formed. She can seem quite 'normal' when she first encounters a person or group, but when it gets past that stage she suffers crippling anxiety, paranoia and depressions. Her emotions always seem to run 'at 11' and have led to several hospitalizations. when she has tried coping with employment. She also suffers from Bipolar Depression (not ordinary depression). Please don't allow the full facts to get in the way of your condescension and lack of empathy.[/p][/quote]Bipolar disorder is treated with medication and therapies very successfully, it doesn't stop you working forever unless you want it to - i.e. use it as an excuse. All the 'symptoms' you mention are all associated with Bipolar disorder - she isn't special in having this condition, many suffer the same and lead to the best of their ability, normal lives. The most famous example being the multi- millionaire and in demand Stephen Fry. Tim Burr
  • Score: -5

2:34pm Thu 20 Feb 14

Tim Burr says...

And anybody wondering what Anopheles means? It's good-for-nothing.
And anybody wondering what Anopheles means? It's good-for-nothing. Tim Burr
  • Score: -4

2:40pm Thu 20 Feb 14

Anopheles says...

Mr Burr, if I could interrupt your cliché happy ignorance for a moment.

I know a lot of disabled, mental and physical, people. A lot of them volunteer in places like drop ins and charity shops. A lot of them want to work, but have you ever tried to admit to mental health problems on a c.v or in an application? Of course, you could lie, but then you have no recourse when your 'odd' behaviour eventually manifests.

Furthermore, Julie Hilling is correct in pointing out that ATOS is a company that has a speciality in computer technology, not health care.

I also doubt that you are aware that 8 people are month are committing suicide because of this system of testing? I doubt you do, or care if you did as you appear to believe that the unemployed, the disable and the ill are less than human.
Mr Burr, if I could interrupt your cliché happy ignorance for a moment. I know a lot of disabled, mental and physical, people. A lot of them volunteer in places like drop ins and charity shops. A lot of them want to work, but have you ever tried to admit to mental health problems on a c.v or in an application? Of course, you could lie, but then you have no recourse when your 'odd' behaviour eventually manifests. Furthermore, Julie Hilling is correct in pointing out that ATOS is a company that has a speciality in computer technology, not health care. I also doubt that you are aware that 8 people are month are committing suicide because of this system of testing? I doubt you do, or care if you did as you appear to believe that the unemployed, the disable and the ill are less than human. Anopheles
  • Score: 21

2:43pm Thu 20 Feb 14

Anopheles says...

Tim Burr wrote:
And anybody wondering what Anopheles means? It's good-for-nothing.
It actually means 'without use'. I don't take my self seriously. You do, which is as humorous as it is mistaken.
[quote][p][bold]Tim Burr[/bold] wrote: And anybody wondering what Anopheles means? It's good-for-nothing.[/p][/quote]It actually means 'without use'. I don't take my self seriously. You do, which is as humorous as it is mistaken. Anopheles
  • Score: 9

2:43pm Thu 20 Feb 14

Jim271 says...

Tim Burr is spot on, people should not be at home all day lying in a pit of their own misery. This should also include long term unemployed.

My solution is any person unemployed longer than 12 months should attend a local college or library 4 days a week 9 am til 3 pm with travelling expenses paid (so long as the library has not been closed) and attend some sort of vocational training or at least get out interacting with other people, This is what happened to me in 1994 and I felt so much better once I was out being productive, it gave me the confidence boost I required.


Sending people into shops stacking shelves is not a solution (unless you agree to pay them the going rate), This will also make it more difficult for persons to commit benefit fraud or criminal activity.

How do we pay for this, answer, bring back the 10% gambling tax which will raise £4 billion a year, If people have got money to gamble they can pay an extra 10%.
Tim Burr is spot on, people should not be at home all day lying in a pit of their own misery. This should also include long term unemployed. My solution is any person unemployed longer than 12 months should attend a local college or library 4 days a week 9 am til 3 pm with travelling expenses paid (so long as the library has not been closed) and attend some sort of vocational training or at least get out interacting with other people, This is what happened to me in 1994 and I felt so much better once I was out being productive, it gave me the confidence boost I required. Sending people into shops stacking shelves is not a solution (unless you agree to pay them the going rate), This will also make it more difficult for persons to commit benefit fraud or criminal activity. How do we pay for this, answer, bring back the 10% gambling tax which will raise £4 billion a year, If people have got money to gamble they can pay an extra 10%. Jim271
  • Score: 7

3:30pm Thu 20 Feb 14

Bilulek says...

I think ATOS is being called unfair just because it introduced stricter rules. If you're really not able to work they can't do anything. But my neighbour: so called disabled - pretends not to be able to walk more than 20 meters when it's assessment time, but in between she walks round Trafford centre for hours, runs around in her BMW convertible with insurance, MOT and road tax paid for her. Then comes back home to a house paid for by housing benefit. Gets the house redecorated and completely refurnished every 6-8 months because that's the only thing she can think of how to spend her £600 a wrk she receives in benefits (howuch she gets is a widely known thing as she seems to be proud of it).
So let's hope ATOS will crack down on people like her. Fingers crossed
I think ATOS is being called unfair just because it introduced stricter rules. If you're really not able to work they can't do anything. But my neighbour: so called disabled - pretends not to be able to walk more than 20 meters when it's assessment time, but in between she walks round Trafford centre for hours, runs around in her BMW convertible with insurance, MOT and road tax paid for her. Then comes back home to a house paid for by housing benefit. Gets the house redecorated and completely refurnished every 6-8 months because that's the only thing she can think of how to spend her £600 a wrk she receives in benefits (howuch she gets is a widely known thing as she seems to be proud of it). So let's hope ATOS will crack down on people like her. Fingers crossed Bilulek
  • Score: 1

6:52pm Thu 20 Feb 14

MsLeftie says...

Completely agree with Anopheles here. Tim you seem to be under the impression that getting help for mental health problems is easy. Well rest assured it is not. People with mental health difficulties do not wake up one day and decide ‘Oh I’ll get some help today and have some therapy!’ Have you ever tried to get help for mental health difficulties especially in Bolton? It really is not that easy. I waited 12 months for therapy, then when that therapy did not work for me because I found it too difficult to engage in at the time, I waited another 2 years for more therapy. Now it is almost a year since I finished long-term therapy on the NHS, which I engaged in twice a week for 18 months, and I am still in an 18-month follow up period. How would I be expected to hold down a job during that time when usually between sessions I was too ill to function normally or I was in hospital for my own safety?

I consider myself lucky that the second lot of therapy has worked, and I am hoping to return back to work in the near future... but not everyone has successful therapy. Depression, Bipolar, Personality Disorders and other illnesses (far too many to mention here!) affect people in different ways. Just because one person might be able to work with a mental health problem does not mean someone else diagnosed with the same condition can.

I’ve experienced mental health from both sides of the fence as an NHS patient and a private one choosing to self fund psychiatrists appointments at The Priory because I could not get seen through Bolton mental health services. It’s took me almost 8 years to get where I am now, and it’s 8 years since I walked out from a well paid job because of mental health problems. During that time, I have done voluntary work, which has given me the flexibility when I have been to unwell to partake in work.

You cannot judge someone because they have their picture in a newspaper, you have no idea how Jeanette’s illness affects her.

The trick to the DWP / ATOS is to supply lots of supporting evidence and information when the time comes to switch you from Incapacity to ESA. I did that, I had letters from varying people involved in my care and my support plan. It took 4 weeks for them to reach a decision and I was placed in the Support Group, without ATOS being involved.
Completely agree with Anopheles here. Tim you seem to be under the impression that getting help for mental health problems is easy. Well rest assured it is not. People with mental health difficulties do not wake up one day and decide ‘Oh I’ll get some help today and have some therapy!’ Have you ever tried to get help for mental health difficulties especially in Bolton? It really is not that easy. I waited 12 months for therapy, then when that therapy did not work for me because I found it too difficult to engage in at the time, I waited another 2 years for more therapy. Now it is almost a year since I finished long-term therapy on the NHS, which I engaged in twice a week for 18 months, and I am still in an 18-month follow up period. How would I be expected to hold down a job during that time when usually between sessions I was too ill to function normally or I was in hospital for my own safety? I consider myself lucky that the second lot of therapy has worked, and I am hoping to return back to work in the near future... but not everyone has successful therapy. Depression, Bipolar, Personality Disorders and other illnesses (far too many to mention here!) affect people in different ways. Just because one person might be able to work with a mental health problem does not mean someone else diagnosed with the same condition can. I’ve experienced mental health from both sides of the fence as an NHS patient and a private one choosing to self fund psychiatrists appointments at The Priory because I could not get seen through Bolton mental health services. It’s took me almost 8 years to get where I am now, and it’s 8 years since I walked out from a well paid job because of mental health problems. During that time, I have done voluntary work, which has given me the flexibility when I have been to unwell to partake in work. You cannot judge someone because they have their picture in a newspaper, you have no idea how Jeanette’s illness affects her. The trick to the DWP / ATOS is to supply lots of supporting evidence and information when the time comes to switch you from Incapacity to ESA. I did that, I had letters from varying people involved in my care and my support plan. It took 4 weeks for them to reach a decision and I was placed in the Support Group, without ATOS being involved. MsLeftie
  • Score: 15

6:58pm Thu 20 Feb 14

MsLeftie says...

Jim271 wrote:
Tim Burr is spot on, people should not be at home all day lying in a pit of their own misery. This should also include long term unemployed.

My solution is any person unemployed longer than 12 months should attend a local college or library 4 days a week 9 am til 3 pm with travelling expenses paid (so long as the library has not been closed) and attend some sort of vocational training or at least get out interacting with other people, This is what happened to me in 1994 and I felt so much better once I was out being productive, it gave me the confidence boost I required.


Sending people into shops stacking shelves is not a solution (unless you agree to pay them the going rate), This will also make it more difficult for persons to commit benefit fraud or criminal activity.

How do we pay for this, answer, bring back the 10% gambling tax which will raise £4 billion a year, If people have got money to gamble they can pay an extra 10%.
You see the make presumption that everyone who is on sickness benefits is lazy. In the past five years, I have studied several short courses at college, including an Access Course, which gained me places in five universities including York. I had to withdraw my place because I was too ill to study what I wanted. Now I am concentrating on simple courses so my CV does not look empty and when I am ready to go back to work (which will be after the surgery I am currently waiting for I hope) and employers will see I have made an effort to keep up to date with skills and not just been ‘mentally ill.’ I wonder how many unemployed people in Bolton who are job hunting have made an effort to update their CV’s by attending college?
[quote][p][bold]Jim271[/bold] wrote: Tim Burr is spot on, people should not be at home all day lying in a pit of their own misery. This should also include long term unemployed. My solution is any person unemployed longer than 12 months should attend a local college or library 4 days a week 9 am til 3 pm with travelling expenses paid (so long as the library has not been closed) and attend some sort of vocational training or at least get out interacting with other people, This is what happened to me in 1994 and I felt so much better once I was out being productive, it gave me the confidence boost I required. Sending people into shops stacking shelves is not a solution (unless you agree to pay them the going rate), This will also make it more difficult for persons to commit benefit fraud or criminal activity. How do we pay for this, answer, bring back the 10% gambling tax which will raise £4 billion a year, If people have got money to gamble they can pay an extra 10%.[/p][/quote]You see the make presumption that everyone who is on sickness benefits is lazy. In the past five years, I have studied several short courses at college, including an Access Course, which gained me places in five universities including York. I had to withdraw my place because I was too ill to study what I wanted. Now I am concentrating on simple courses so my CV does not look empty and when I am ready to go back to work (which will be after the surgery I am currently waiting for I hope) and employers will see I have made an effort to keep up to date with skills and not just been ‘mentally ill.’ I wonder how many unemployed people in Bolton who are job hunting have made an effort to update their CV’s by attending college? MsLeftie
  • Score: 8

8:51am Fri 21 Feb 14

Miltzy says...

If the government wanted to get people into back into work (which would mean they had to care first) they wouldn't sanction job seekers and leave them to go to food banks. If you have no money for however many weeks, you can't do anything but try to survive. It doesn't make you want to go and find work, it makes you feel worthless. No travel money, no food money, no money to feed electricity meters or gas meters. How does this help someone into work? No, if the government genuinely cared about people finding employment they would be giving people a incentives, like no sanctioning, and a proper living wage, that's providing there are actually jobs to get. But unfortunately caring about people isn't on the governments agenda.
If the government wanted to get people into back into work (which would mean they had to care first) they wouldn't sanction job seekers and leave them to go to food banks. If you have no money for however many weeks, you can't do anything but try to survive. It doesn't make you want to go and find work, it makes you feel worthless. No travel money, no food money, no money to feed electricity meters or gas meters. How does this help someone into work? No, if the government genuinely cared about people finding employment they would be giving people a incentives, like no sanctioning, and a proper living wage, that's providing there are actually jobs to get. But unfortunately caring about people isn't on the governments agenda. Miltzy
  • Score: 8

9:29am Fri 21 Feb 14

Anopheles says...

Some people really can't see the wood for the trees. Julie Hilling is a caring, hard working MP who actually looks out for her constituents. She has an empathic and sympathetic attitude and deserves to be treated with respect. I guess to so derogaTORY to a fellow human being shows lack of respect for oneself.
I think it needs to be acknowledged that Ms Jones showed great courage in allowing herself to be published in the paper and for highlighting the plight of those genuine claimants who are worried about being tested by ATOS "Healthcare". She disclosed that she had won her appeal and who knows what impact the day might have had on her.
Incidentally bipolar and other mental health conditions are not necessarily
controlled with meds. Stephen Fry was on TV last year talking about an overdose he had taken. I suspect Mr. Fry would be appalled by some of the comments made.
Some people have such a lot to learn - especially the ones who read right wing broadsheets and tabloids, the pennies would be better spent donating to a charity. There are a lot of people with mental health problems who contribute to our "ig Society". I think people should think before they make uneducated comments - perhaps that will be the next entry in The DSM Manual.
Things are not always as clear cut as they first appear.
Some people really can't see the wood for the trees. Julie Hilling is a caring, hard working MP who actually looks out for her constituents. She has an empathic and sympathetic attitude and deserves to be treated with respect. I guess to so derogaTORY to a fellow human being shows lack of respect for oneself. I think it needs to be acknowledged that Ms Jones showed great courage in allowing herself to be published in the paper and for highlighting the plight of those genuine claimants who are worried about being tested by ATOS "Healthcare". She disclosed that she had won her appeal and who knows what impact the day might have had on her. Incidentally bipolar and other mental health conditions are not necessarily controlled with meds. Stephen Fry was on TV last year talking about an overdose he had taken. I suspect Mr. Fry would be appalled by some of the comments made. Some people have such a lot to learn - especially the ones who read right wing broadsheets and tabloids, the pennies would be better spent donating to a charity. There are a lot of people with mental health problems who contribute to our "ig Society". I think people should think before they make uneducated comments - perhaps that will be the next entry in The DSM Manual. Things are not always as clear cut as they first appear. Anopheles
  • Score: 7

9:40am Fri 21 Feb 14

Anopheles says...

Agreed Miltzy. we know of people who have been sanctioned, it's a disgrace. They end up getting ill, being evicted, having their children put in to care etc. This puts more pressure on our NHS, social services, police force, communities. REVOLVING DOOR SPRING TO MIND. This is a concept that some people do not seem to be capable of grasping.
Agreed Miltzy. we know of people who have been sanctioned, it's a disgrace. They end up getting ill, being evicted, having their children put in to care etc. This puts more pressure on our NHS, social services, police force, communities. REVOLVING DOOR SPRING TO MIND. This is a concept that some people do not seem to be capable of grasping. Anopheles
  • Score: 7

9:57am Fri 21 Feb 14

Jim271 says...

Mrs Leftie its not myself that think the disabled are Lazy its the Government that writes them off I was objecting to,

read the post properly.
Mrs Leftie its not myself that think the disabled are Lazy its the Government that writes them off I was objecting to, read the post properly. Jim271
  • Score: 0

12:10pm Fri 21 Feb 14

Atherton Lad says...

Totally agree that Atos are a disgrace but take objection to the sentiment that Julie Hilling is a good MP. She will jump onto any passing bandwagon and exploit any media opportunity. She is a faux socialist of the highest order.
Totally agree that Atos are a disgrace but take objection to the sentiment that Julie Hilling is a good MP. She will jump onto any passing bandwagon and exploit any media opportunity. She is a faux socialist of the highest order. Atherton Lad
  • Score: 1

8:04pm Sat 22 Feb 14

Puffin-Billy says...

Depression is of course, a mental illness. But Mental health services, like the rest of the National Health Service are being decimated - for the benefit of private businesses who will step into the place of the NHS and in the case of Atos, into the gap left by an underfunded Welfare State
>
Atos is just another weapon in the armoury of this cruel, inhumane government, with which to persecute the vulnerable in society.
>
Cllr Andy Morgan sits, we are frequently told, on Bolton's Health Overview and Scrutiny Committee.
>
But of course neither Cllr Andy Morgan, nor anyone else who supports the Coalition Government's policies which are aimed at destroying Britain's welfare state , our Public Services, and our NHS, will be seen dead, pictured in the Bolton News, supporting the members of Unite, and Bolton Against the Bedroom Tax.
>
The reason is simple, he and his ilk are fundamentally opposed to any form of social justice administered by a Welfare State..
>>>>>
Cllr Andy Morgan and the Conservatives care so little about the provision of mental health services in Bolton and around the region that he supports the policies which mean that:

1. although the Royal College of Psychiatrists recommend an 85% occupancy rate, some wards are reaching 138%.

2. patients are being discharged early to free up beds resulting in one patient being re-admitted 8 times in 12 months.

3. the NHS is spending millions of pounds sending severely ill patients hundreds of miles to private hospitals.

4. a mentally ill patient had to undergo a 5 and a 1/2 hour journey to Carlisle.

5. acutely mentally unwell children are being admitted to adult psychiatric wards.

6. a mentally ill 12 year old girl shouted out of a window to her mummy who had to travel 130 miles to visit her: ‘mummy don’t leave me’.

7. 1700, ONE THOUSAND SEVEN HUNDRED mental health beds closed in England in the last 2 years.

8. NHS mental health care is now in crisis, with duty workers across England reporting times when there are no beds available anywhere.

9. mental illness is increasing due to stress.

10. the number of elderly people is increasing, while services for them are being cut.

11. replacement services are not defined.

12. replacement Services have not been piloted.

13. replacement services are not evidence based.

14. there will be a net loss of jobs.

15. section 188 threat of redundancy notice have been given to the unions representing staff.
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THANKS TO THE POLICIES WHICH CLLR. ANDY MORGAN SUPPORTS:
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In Bolton 2 in 5 children are classed as living in poverty.
>
. In Bolton, 500 people a week have been using food banks.
>
. In Bolton there are more than 50 agencies who are working on the front line alleviating financial hardship.
>
. 500,000 people have visited food banks since last Easter.
>
. 5,500 people have been admitted to hospital suffering from malnutrition.
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. The Red Cross are delivering food parcels for first time since the second world war.
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. In 6 months in 2013, 10,000 people turned to food banks.
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. Changes to disability benefits have cut the income of about 600,000 people.
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. 1 in 5 Children in England are classed as living in poverty.
>
. Hospital diagnoses of cases of malnutrition have doubled in last five years.
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. One in 6 GPs have been asked to refer patients to food banks in the past year.
>
. More than 700,000 emergency food parcels handed out by Trussell Trust in 2013.
>
. A Scottish Government report identifies: welfare reform, benefit delays, benefit sanctions as the main drivers of demand for food banks.
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**** right - the Conservatives don't give ATOS
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Depression is of course, a mental illness. But Mental health services, like the rest of the National Health Service are being decimated - for the benefit of private businesses who will step into the place of the NHS and in the case of Atos, into the gap left by an underfunded Welfare State > Atos is just another weapon in the armoury of this cruel, inhumane government, with which to persecute the vulnerable in society. > Cllr Andy Morgan sits, we are frequently told, on Bolton's Health Overview and Scrutiny Committee. > But of course neither Cllr Andy Morgan, nor anyone else who supports the Coalition Government's policies which are aimed at destroying Britain's welfare state , our Public Services, and our NHS, will be seen dead, pictured in the Bolton News, supporting the members of Unite, and Bolton Against the Bedroom Tax. > The reason is simple, he and his ilk are fundamentally opposed to any form of social justice administered by a Welfare State.. >>>>> Cllr Andy Morgan and the Conservatives care so little about the provision of mental health services in Bolton and around the region that he supports the policies which mean that: 1. although the Royal College of Psychiatrists recommend an 85% occupancy rate, some wards are reaching 138%. 2. patients are being discharged early to free up beds resulting in one patient being re-admitted 8 times in 12 months. 3. the NHS is spending millions of pounds sending severely ill patients hundreds of miles to private hospitals. 4. a mentally ill patient had to undergo a 5 and a 1/2 hour journey to Carlisle. 5. acutely mentally unwell children are being admitted to adult psychiatric wards. 6. a mentally ill 12 year old girl shouted out of a window to her mummy who had to travel 130 miles to visit her: ‘mummy don’t leave me’. 7. 1700, ONE THOUSAND SEVEN HUNDRED mental health beds closed in England in the last 2 years. 8. NHS mental health care is now in crisis, with duty workers across England reporting times when there are no beds available anywhere. 9. mental illness is increasing due to stress. 10. the number of elderly people is increasing, while services for them are being cut. 11. replacement services are not defined. 12. replacement Services have not been piloted. 13. replacement services are not evidence based. 14. there will be a net loss of jobs. 15. section 188 threat of redundancy notice have been given to the unions representing staff. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> THANKS TO THE POLICIES WHICH CLLR. ANDY MORGAN SUPPORTS: >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> In Bolton 2 in 5 children are classed as living in poverty. > . In Bolton, 500 people a week have been using food banks. > . In Bolton there are more than 50 agencies who are working on the front line alleviating financial hardship. > . 500,000 people have visited food banks since last Easter. > . 5,500 people have been admitted to hospital suffering from malnutrition. > . The Red Cross are delivering food parcels for first time since the second world war. > . In 6 months in 2013, 10,000 people turned to food banks. > . Changes to disability benefits have cut the income of about 600,000 people. > . 1 in 5 Children in England are classed as living in poverty. > . Hospital diagnoses of cases of malnutrition have doubled in last five years. > . One in 6 GPs have been asked to refer patients to food banks in the past year. > . More than 700,000 emergency food parcels handed out by Trussell Trust in 2013. > . A Scottish Government report identifies: welfare reform, benefit delays, benefit sanctions as the main drivers of demand for food banks. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> **** right - the Conservatives don't give ATOS >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> > Puffin-Billy
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