Nine schools in Bolton to close in one-day strike next week

Nine schools in Bolton to close in one-day strike next week

Smithills Academy will be closed

Blackshaw Primary School will be closed

First published in News
Last updated

EIGHT schools in Bolton have confirmed they will be shut or partially closed to pupils when teachers stage a mass walkout in protest at changes in working conditions.

Other schools are hoping to make a decision later this week and letters will be sent out to parents.

Members of the National Union of Teachers will hold the national strike on Wednesday, March 26, as part of a long-running dispute over pay, pensions and conditions.

So far, Smithills Academy, Haslam Park Primary in Deane, Blackshaw Primary in Bradley Fold, St William’s CE Primary in Great Lever, St Michael CE Primary in Great Lever and Castle Hill Primary in Tonge Moor will be completely closed.

In addition, Canon Slade School in Bradshaw Brow and St George CE Primary in Westhougton will all be partially closed.

Julia Simpkins, secretary of the Bolton-branch of the National Union of Teachers (NUT), said: “This strike is about teachers and children.

“Teachers’ workload is increasing and we are being kept away from the classroom. This is not good for students.

“All we want to do is teach rather than complete paperwork, which is mainly for Ofsted, which is more interested in that than teaching.”

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Ms Simpkins said that NUT representatives would be in the town centre on Saturday, giving out leaflets outlining clearly why the union is being forced to take this action The NUT has about 1,646 members in Bolton.

The walkout is the second in less than a year.

Teachers — members of the NUT and the NASUWT, National Association of Schoolmasters and Union of Women Teachers — at more than 120 schools in Bolton became the first in the country to strike in protest over pay, pensions and conditions last June as part of a rolling programme of regional strikes.

A strike was called off in November but a stalemate situation has meant the NUT announced another strike last month.

Simon Bramwell, headteacher of SS Simon and Jude’s CE Primary School in Great Lever, said: “Managing a school in a strike is far from simple.

“We would not cover striking colleagues so as a minimum those classes that should be being taught for all or part of the day by striking staff would need to stay at home.

“The difficulty comes when staff do not indicate whether or not they intend to strike, or if the particular school is picketed, whether of not staff will cross picket lines. This creates uncertainty and potential health and safety issues.

“As a headteacher I need to know whether I have enough staff in school to keep the children safe.

"I know many fellow heads, whilst sympathetic to the general tenor of the action, would want to provide uninterrupted education for the pupils in their charge, however if the majority of your staff are going to be missing there is a balance of risks assessment that needs to be conducted on a school by school basis.”

Mr Bramwell, former President of the National Association of headteachers in Bolton added: "The other obligation is to our parents.

"School strike action hits our parents hard as they struggle to arrange last minute child care.

"We therefore need to give them as much notice as possible which may mean heads making a decision on class or school closures before full facts are known.

“I feel disappointed that the proposed action could not have been timed for after pupils sit their SATs in May.

“Even if a school does close to children, non-striking staff need to attend work and be given other duties.

"I would always urge any group to try and resolve their differences with the employers, in such a way that it doesn’t impact negatively on children and parents."

For the first time Bolton Council will not be publishing a list of schools shut or partially closed before the strike.

A council spokesman said: “Headteachers and school governors are responsible for making local decisions about how to respond to industrial action.

“They will make a judgement on whether their school should either fully or partly close based on how many staff are likely to be on strike and whether they are able to provide a safe learning environment for pupils.

“Schools are best placed to inform children and parents about their plans to close and we have asked that they be notified as soon as possible through their usual school communication channels."

Comments (71)

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7:08am Tue 18 Mar 14

JustBecause says...

Double standards, take your child out of school for holiday and your fined, yet striking so,children cannot attend is fine, ridiculous.
Double standards, take your child out of school for holiday and your fined, yet striking so,children cannot attend is fine, ridiculous. JustBecause
  • Score: 50

7:14am Tue 18 Mar 14

StGibbs says...

JustBecause wrote:
Double standards, take your child out of school for holiday and your fined, yet striking so,children cannot attend is fine, ridiculous.
Strike and you lose your day's pay.
A kind of fine or punishment.

I see no double standards here.
I'm behind them all the way. Time for a General Strike. The (men?) at the top earn far too much, the workers at the bottom do all the hard graft.
[quote][p][bold]JustBecause[/bold] wrote: Double standards, take your child out of school for holiday and your fined, yet striking so,children cannot attend is fine, ridiculous.[/p][/quote]Strike and you lose your day's pay. A kind of fine or punishment. I see no double standards here. I'm behind them all the way. Time for a General Strike. The (men?) at the top earn far too much, the workers at the bottom do all the hard graft. StGibbs
  • Score: -8

7:35am Tue 18 Mar 14

atlas123 says...

Teachers, one of the few professions Maggie didnt get around to sorting out
Teachers, one of the few professions Maggie didnt get around to sorting out atlas123
  • Score: -8

8:01am Tue 18 Mar 14

chemangel says...

Take your child out of school - they miss work and fall behind their classmates; the teachers do not have time to individually teach your child to catch up what they missed while they were absent. School closes everyone is still at the same place and no-one is having to catch up, less educational impact all round.
Take your child out of school - they miss work and fall behind their classmates; the teachers do not have time to individually teach your child to catch up what they missed while they were absent. School closes everyone is still at the same place and no-one is having to catch up, less educational impact all round. chemangel
  • Score: -3

8:03am Tue 18 Mar 14

BWFC71 says...

atlas123 wrote:
Teachers, one of the few professions Maggie didnt get around to sorting out
If our working conditions were changed without prior knowledge and for the worst what would YOU do?

Lets put it this way what are the schools that are closing are not yet "academies" and still part of the Council's remit? whilst the teachers at academies are paid almost 1/3 more with far better working conditions!

If a council-run school has to be good then t has to keep the teachers and even create more teaching posts thus increasing the wage bill to keep inline with teachers pay in thee private sector or are you not bothered that the standard of teaching will be lower because of the class sizes - the less in the class the better the standard!!!

Anyway read the report - they are striking over working conditions which WILL affect your children, therefore you should be supporting the teachers.

As for your comment, JustBecause, when can they strike to make an impact and show what is going wrong if they were not allowed to strike during teaching time?

Remember the change in working conditions means that the education of your child WILL be affected for the worse and not better!
[quote][p][bold]atlas123[/bold] wrote: Teachers, one of the few professions Maggie didnt get around to sorting out[/p][/quote]If our working conditions were changed without prior knowledge and for the worst what would YOU do? Lets put it this way what are the schools that are closing are not yet "academies" and still part of the Council's remit? whilst the teachers at academies are paid almost 1/3 more with far better working conditions! If a council-run school has to be good then t has to keep the teachers and even create more teaching posts thus increasing the wage bill to keep inline with teachers pay in thee private sector or are you not bothered that the standard of teaching will be lower because of the class sizes - the less in the class the better the standard!!! Anyway read the report - they are striking over working conditions which WILL affect your children, therefore you should be supporting the teachers. As for your comment, JustBecause, when can they strike to make an impact and show what is going wrong if they were not allowed to strike during teaching time? Remember the change in working conditions means that the education of your child WILL be affected for the worse and not better! BWFC71
  • Score: -6

8:05am Tue 18 Mar 14

Albinosupport says...

Not the best time to strike, but there never is a 'best' time. What about all the year 11 students who are getting ready for their exams and need all the tuition they can get at the moment, not ideal.

I understand that they have not had a pay rise, neither have I, and I am on even less at just above minimum wage but I can't go on strike.

Good on those schools that are staying open.
Not the best time to strike, but there never is a 'best' time. What about all the year 11 students who are getting ready for their exams and need all the tuition they can get at the moment, not ideal. I understand that they have not had a pay rise, neither have I, and I am on even less at just above minimum wage but I can't go on strike. Good on those schools that are staying open. Albinosupport
  • Score: 16

8:12am Tue 18 Mar 14

breightmet kid says...

Teachers have very good jobs, well paid, with secure pensions. What more do they want? I think they should be paid on results of their efforts, that is on how well their pupils do in the examinations. The vast majority of schools in Bolton under perform, as the published figures show, so teachers salaries should be re-assessed to show this. Also how many children are leaving school unable to read, write or add up properly? Another reflection on poor teaching standards.

Get back to work and do the job properly, our kids lives depend on you.
Teachers have very good jobs, well paid, with secure pensions. What more do they want? I think they should be paid on results of their efforts, that is on how well their pupils do in the examinations. The vast majority of schools in Bolton under perform, as the published figures show, so teachers salaries should be re-assessed to show this. Also how many children are leaving school unable to read, write or add up properly? Another reflection on poor teaching standards. Get back to work and do the job properly, our kids lives depend on you. breightmet kid
  • Score: -9

8:15am Tue 18 Mar 14

Balboa says...

Just sack them. Had enough of moaning, whingeing, complaining, ungrateful teachers anyway. They never appreciate anything and want it all their own way, being told what to do by their union masters, who incidentally take part of the teachers' salary in subscriptions and funding.
Just sack them. Had enough of moaning, whingeing, complaining, ungrateful teachers anyway. They never appreciate anything and want it all their own way, being told what to do by their union masters, who incidentally take part of the teachers' salary in subscriptions and funding. Balboa
  • Score: -13

8:24am Tue 18 Mar 14

atlas123 says...

BWFC71 wrote:
atlas123 wrote:
Teachers, one of the few professions Maggie didnt get around to sorting out
If our working conditions were changed without prior knowledge and for the worst what would YOU do?

Lets put it this way what are the schools that are closing are not yet "academies" and still part of the Council's remit? whilst the teachers at academies are paid almost 1/3 more with far better working conditions!

If a council-run school has to be good then t has to keep the teachers and even create more teaching posts thus increasing the wage bill to keep inline with teachers pay in thee private sector or are you not bothered that the standard of teaching will be lower because of the class sizes - the less in the class the better the standard!!!

Anyway read the report - they are striking over working conditions which WILL affect your children, therefore you should be supporting the teachers.

As for your comment, JustBecause, when can they strike to make an impact and show what is going wrong if they were not allowed to strike during teaching time?

Remember the change in working conditions means that the education of your child WILL be affected for the worse and not better!
I Suspect the lack of schooling will affect the kids more than any changes.

If the teachersdon't like the t and c they are free to move or seek alternative employment.

I did. And as it stands I have had no pay rise for three years and have been told not to expect one for two more, whilst those on minimum wage working for the same group will shortley get an inflation busting rise.

Life is like that sometimes.

Teachers in particular, but most people who work in the public sector have noidea what life is like in the real wworld!
[quote][p][bold]BWFC71[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]atlas123[/bold] wrote: Teachers, one of the few professions Maggie didnt get around to sorting out[/p][/quote]If our working conditions were changed without prior knowledge and for the worst what would YOU do? Lets put it this way what are the schools that are closing are not yet "academies" and still part of the Council's remit? whilst the teachers at academies are paid almost 1/3 more with far better working conditions! If a council-run school has to be good then t has to keep the teachers and even create more teaching posts thus increasing the wage bill to keep inline with teachers pay in thee private sector or are you not bothered that the standard of teaching will be lower because of the class sizes - the less in the class the better the standard!!! Anyway read the report - they are striking over working conditions which WILL affect your children, therefore you should be supporting the teachers. As for your comment, JustBecause, when can they strike to make an impact and show what is going wrong if they were not allowed to strike during teaching time? Remember the change in working conditions means that the education of your child WILL be affected for the worse and not better![/p][/quote]I Suspect the lack of schooling will affect the kids more than any changes. If the teachersdon't like the t and c they are free to move or seek alternative employment. I did. And as it stands I have had no pay rise for three years and have been told not to expect one for two more, whilst those on minimum wage working for the same group will shortley get an inflation busting rise. Life is like that sometimes. Teachers in particular, but most people who work in the public sector have noidea what life is like in the real wworld! atlas123
  • Score: -4

8:29am Tue 18 Mar 14

Gore Seer says...

Pay And Pensions Are Fantastic And The Tax Free Lump Sum. My Ex Girlfriend Got A £38,000 Tax Free, She Retired At the Age Of 52, Now On Top Of Her School Pension,She Gets State Pen She Is Quids In.She Taught First Year Infants And Had Two Helpers, Me I Was A Monkey I Had To Work 60 Hour Weeks For Peanuts.
Pay And Pensions Are Fantastic And The Tax Free Lump Sum. My Ex Girlfriend Got A £38,000 Tax Free, She Retired At the Age Of 52, Now On Top Of Her School Pension,She Gets State Pen She Is Quids In.She Taught First Year Infants And Had Two Helpers, Me I Was A Monkey I Had To Work 60 Hour Weeks For Peanuts. Gore Seer
  • Score: 5

9:17am Tue 18 Mar 14

underwater says...

breightmet kid wrote:
Teachers have very good jobs, well paid, with secure pensions. What more do they want? I think they should be paid on results of their efforts, that is on how well their pupils do in the examinations. The vast majority of schools in Bolton under perform, as the published figures show, so teachers salaries should be re-assessed to show this. Also how many children are leaving school unable to read, write or add up properly? Another reflection on poor teaching standards.

Get back to work and do the job properly, our kids lives depend on you.
Well said,teachers should get on with the job they are well paid for doing.There would be a massive drop in salaries paid if they were paid on results.They work in clean, warm, pleasant conditions unlike a lot of workers who do not get the same amount of pay or holidays. To strike is only going to affect the children they say they care about.
[quote][p][bold]breightmet kid[/bold] wrote: Teachers have very good jobs, well paid, with secure pensions. What more do they want? I think they should be paid on results of their efforts, that is on how well their pupils do in the examinations. The vast majority of schools in Bolton under perform, as the published figures show, so teachers salaries should be re-assessed to show this. Also how many children are leaving school unable to read, write or add up properly? Another reflection on poor teaching standards. Get back to work and do the job properly, our kids lives depend on you.[/p][/quote]Well said,teachers should get on with the job they are well paid for doing.There would be a massive drop in salaries paid if they were paid on results.They work in clean, warm, pleasant conditions unlike a lot of workers who do not get the same amount of pay or holidays. To strike is only going to affect the children they say they care about. underwater
  • Score: -4

9:47am Tue 18 Mar 14

MarkAllRead says...

chemangel wrote:
Take your child out of school - they miss work and fall behind their classmates; the teachers do not have time to individually teach your child to catch up what they missed while they were absent. School closes everyone is still at the same place and no-one is having to catch up, less educational impact all round.
Er... if the school closes for a day then *everyone* is a day behind and has to catch up.
[quote][p][bold]chemangel[/bold] wrote: Take your child out of school - they miss work and fall behind their classmates; the teachers do not have time to individually teach your child to catch up what they missed while they were absent. School closes everyone is still at the same place and no-one is having to catch up, less educational impact all round.[/p][/quote]Er... if the school closes for a day then *everyone* is a day behind and has to catch up. MarkAllRead
  • Score: -3

9:50am Tue 18 Mar 14

BWFC71 says...

Balboa wrote:
Just sack them. Had enough of moaning, whingeing, complaining, ungrateful teachers anyway. They never appreciate anything and want it all their own way, being told what to do by their union masters, who incidentally take part of the teachers' salary in subscriptions and funding.
Funny you were possibly taught by the exact same teachers and look ho you have turned out - actually saying that....

It seems you do not understand the situation - teachers working conditions are changing because of more paperwork involved which will, actually, take them away from teaching!!!! So who is going to teach the children whilst the teachers are having to do the paperwork?

These same working conditions are NOT being applied to teachers in academies - why is that?
[quote][p][bold]Balboa[/bold] wrote: Just sack them. Had enough of moaning, whingeing, complaining, ungrateful teachers anyway. They never appreciate anything and want it all their own way, being told what to do by their union masters, who incidentally take part of the teachers' salary in subscriptions and funding.[/p][/quote]Funny you were possibly taught by the exact same teachers and look ho you have turned out - actually saying that.... It seems you do not understand the situation - teachers working conditions are changing because of more paperwork involved which will, actually, take them away from teaching!!!! So who is going to teach the children whilst the teachers are having to do the paperwork? These same working conditions are NOT being applied to teachers in academies - why is that? BWFC71
  • Score: 2

9:54am Tue 18 Mar 14

BWFC71 says...

Albinosupport wrote:
Not the best time to strike, but there never is a 'best' time. What about all the year 11 students who are getting ready for their exams and need all the tuition they can get at the moment, not ideal. I understand that they have not had a pay rise, neither have I, and I am on even less at just above minimum wage but I can't go on strike. Good on those schools that are staying open.
This is not about pay - please read the news report.

It is about the change in working conditions which means even more paperwork, for Ofsted, and in turn means less teaching time - does this mean that the teachers assistants have more of a role (i.e. unprofessional people teaching children?)

More paperwork equates to less teaching time and less of teacher getting to know how children are doing and in turn not being able to help children that require the help! Thu creating an new underclass of even less educated children!
[quote][p][bold]Albinosupport[/bold] wrote: Not the best time to strike, but there never is a 'best' time. What about all the year 11 students who are getting ready for their exams and need all the tuition they can get at the moment, not ideal. I understand that they have not had a pay rise, neither have I, and I am on even less at just above minimum wage but I can't go on strike. Good on those schools that are staying open.[/p][/quote]This is not about pay - please read the news report. It is about the change in working conditions which means even more paperwork, for Ofsted, and in turn means less teaching time - does this mean that the teachers assistants have more of a role (i.e. unprofessional people teaching children?) More paperwork equates to less teaching time and less of teacher getting to know how children are doing and in turn not being able to help children that require the help! Thu creating an new underclass of even less educated children! BWFC71
  • Score: -2

9:55am Tue 18 Mar 14

MarkAllRead says...

JustBecause wrote:
Double standards, take your child out of school for holiday and your fined, yet striking so,children cannot attend is fine, ridiculous.
Did your teachers strike on the day they were supposed to teach the difference between "your" and "you're"?
[quote][p][bold]JustBecause[/bold] wrote: Double standards, take your child out of school for holiday and your fined, yet striking so,children cannot attend is fine, ridiculous.[/p][/quote]Did your teachers strike on the day they were supposed to teach the difference between "your" and "you're"? MarkAllRead
  • Score: 24

9:58am Tue 18 Mar 14

BWFC71 says...

MarkAllRead wrote:
JustBecause wrote: Double standards, take your child out of school for holiday and your fined, yet striking so,children cannot attend is fine, ridiculous.
Did your teachers strike on the day they were supposed to teach the difference between "your" and "you're"?
Possibly did, especially if the poster went to school in the 1980's when the teachers went on strike more often than in today's world - and yet it is those children that are now running today's world and, in general, no harm was done!
[quote][p][bold]MarkAllRead[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]JustBecause[/bold] wrote: Double standards, take your child out of school for holiday and your fined, yet striking so,children cannot attend is fine, ridiculous.[/p][/quote]Did your teachers strike on the day they were supposed to teach the difference between "your" and "you're"?[/p][/quote]Possibly did, especially if the poster went to school in the 1980's when the teachers went on strike more often than in today's world - and yet it is those children that are now running today's world and, in general, no harm was done! BWFC71
  • Score: -17

9:59am Tue 18 Mar 14

myfanwy7 says...

breightmet kid wrote:
Teachers have very good jobs, well paid, with secure pensions. What more do they want? I think they should be paid on results of their efforts, that is on how well their pupils do in the examinations. The vast majority of schools in Bolton under perform, as the published figures show, so teachers salaries should be re-assessed to show this. Also how many children are leaving school unable to read, write or add up properly? Another reflection on poor teaching standards.

Get back to work and do the job properly, our kids lives depend on you.
You're obviously not in education, though you are perhaps a parent. Amazing how everyone seems to know so much about teaching just because they went to school. By your logic we should pay doctors more for ensuring their patients never die and penalize them if they have a death, and just like health, education standards are only in part down to good teaching. There's good parenting which imbues an interest in learning, a secure homelife, support of the school's aims etc. Teaching alone cannot remedy many of the challenges presented by children's backgrounds. Exam results are a reflection of the child's progress under several teachers - why just reward the one who happens to have them in year 11 or whatever? The vast majority do do the job "properly" - whatever that means in your eyes, but are using the only weapon they have got to show their objection to the deterioration in their pay and conditions. It's called industrial action and is legitimate and not entered into lightly - if more people took a stand instead of being so supine, we'd have a country our children would be less fearful of when they do eventually leave school.
[quote][p][bold]breightmet kid[/bold] wrote: Teachers have very good jobs, well paid, with secure pensions. What more do they want? I think they should be paid on results of their efforts, that is on how well their pupils do in the examinations. The vast majority of schools in Bolton under perform, as the published figures show, so teachers salaries should be re-assessed to show this. Also how many children are leaving school unable to read, write or add up properly? Another reflection on poor teaching standards. Get back to work and do the job properly, our kids lives depend on you.[/p][/quote]You're obviously not in education, though you are perhaps a parent. Amazing how everyone seems to know so much about teaching just because they went to school. By your logic we should pay doctors more for ensuring their patients never die and penalize them if they have a death, and just like health, education standards are only in part down to good teaching. There's good parenting which imbues an interest in learning, a secure homelife, support of the school's aims etc. Teaching alone cannot remedy many of the challenges presented by children's backgrounds. Exam results are a reflection of the child's progress under several teachers - why just reward the one who happens to have them in year 11 or whatever? The vast majority do do the job "properly" - whatever that means in your eyes, but are using the only weapon they have got to show their objection to the deterioration in their pay and conditions. It's called industrial action and is legitimate and not entered into lightly - if more people took a stand instead of being so supine, we'd have a country our children would be less fearful of when they do eventually leave school. myfanwy7
  • Score: 21

10:02am Tue 18 Mar 14

BWFC71 says...

Another change in a teachers working conditions are those who teach children between the ages of 16 and 17. They do not know what they are going to be teaching come September! They honestly do not whether they will be doing the GCSE course or the new Baccalaureate exams - and if it is the new exams then they do not know the coursework and the text books are not printed either, plus the teachers will have to be taught about the new exam and the courses involved (and it is less than 6 months before the proposed changes take place!!!) - and it all takes its toll on the education of the child!!!
Another change in a teachers working conditions are those who teach children between the ages of 16 and 17. They do not know what they are going to be teaching come September! They honestly do not whether they will be doing the GCSE course or the new Baccalaureate exams - and if it is the new exams then they do not know the coursework and the text books are not printed either, plus the teachers will have to be taught about the new exam and the courses involved (and it is less than 6 months before the proposed changes take place!!!) - and it all takes its toll on the education of the child!!! BWFC71
  • Score: -7

10:06am Tue 18 Mar 14

BWFC71 says...

Gore Seer wrote:
Pay And Pensions Are Fantastic And The Tax Free Lump Sum. My Ex Girlfriend Got A £38,000 Tax Free, She Retired At the Age Of 52, Now On Top Of Her School Pension,She Gets State Pen She Is Quids In.She Taught First Year Infants And Had Two Helpers, Me I Was A Monkey I Had To Work 60 Hour Weeks For Peanuts.
But if you had stayed at school and took on the profession, instead of knocking it then you would have also been paid the same.

You only get out of life what you put into it! For you, education was a big plan but that meant you were sidelined for so many decently paid jobs and hence you haven't really got that far in life - possibly you are happy with that, who knows, but do not knock people because of their choice of profession and how they have progressed!
[quote][p][bold]Gore Seer[/bold] wrote: Pay And Pensions Are Fantastic And The Tax Free Lump Sum. My Ex Girlfriend Got A £38,000 Tax Free, She Retired At the Age Of 52, Now On Top Of Her School Pension,She Gets State Pen She Is Quids In.She Taught First Year Infants And Had Two Helpers, Me I Was A Monkey I Had To Work 60 Hour Weeks For Peanuts.[/p][/quote]But if you had stayed at school and took on the profession, instead of knocking it then you would have also been paid the same. You only get out of life what you put into it! For you, education was a big plan but that meant you were sidelined for so many decently paid jobs and hence you haven't really got that far in life - possibly you are happy with that, who knows, but do not knock people because of their choice of profession and how they have progressed! BWFC71
  • Score: 1

10:11am Tue 18 Mar 14

boltonchap says...

BWFC71 wrote:
Albinosupport wrote:
Not the best time to strike, but there never is a 'best' time. What about all the year 11 students who are getting ready for their exams and need all the tuition they can get at the moment, not ideal. I understand that they have not had a pay rise, neither have I, and I am on even less at just above minimum wage but I can't go on strike. Good on those schools that are staying open.
This is not about pay - please read the news report.

It is about the change in working conditions which means even more paperwork, for Ofsted, and in turn means less teaching time - does this mean that the teachers assistants have more of a role (i.e. unprofessional people teaching children?)

More paperwork equates to less teaching time and less of teacher getting to know how children are doing and in turn not being able to help children that require the help! Thu creating an new underclass of even less educated children!
It is about pay. Read the article:

" Members of the National Union of Teachers will hold the national strike on Wednesday, March 26, as part of a long-running dispute over pay, pensions and conditions ".
[quote][p][bold]BWFC71[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Albinosupport[/bold] wrote: Not the best time to strike, but there never is a 'best' time. What about all the year 11 students who are getting ready for their exams and need all the tuition they can get at the moment, not ideal. I understand that they have not had a pay rise, neither have I, and I am on even less at just above minimum wage but I can't go on strike. Good on those schools that are staying open.[/p][/quote]This is not about pay - please read the news report. It is about the change in working conditions which means even more paperwork, for Ofsted, and in turn means less teaching time - does this mean that the teachers assistants have more of a role (i.e. unprofessional people teaching children?) More paperwork equates to less teaching time and less of teacher getting to know how children are doing and in turn not being able to help children that require the help! Thu creating an new underclass of even less educated children![/p][/quote]It is about pay. Read the article: " Members of the National Union of Teachers will hold the national strike on Wednesday, March 26, as part of a long-running dispute over pay, pensions and conditions ". boltonchap
  • Score: 3

10:19am Tue 18 Mar 14

Hollieanne says...

BWFC71 wrote:
atlas123 wrote: Teachers, one of the few professions Maggie didnt get around to sorting out
If our working conditions were changed without prior knowledge and for the worst what would YOU do? Lets put it this way what are the schools that are closing are not yet "academies" and still part of the Council's remit? whilst the teachers at academies are paid almost 1/3 more with far better working conditions! If a council-run school has to be good then t has to keep the teachers and even create more teaching posts thus increasing the wage bill to keep inline with teachers pay in thee private sector or are you not bothered that the standard of teaching will be lower because of the class sizes - the less in the class the better the standard!!! Anyway read the report - they are striking over working conditions which WILL affect your children, therefore you should be supporting the teachers. As for your comment, JustBecause, when can they strike to make an impact and show what is going wrong if they were not allowed to strike during teaching time? Remember the change in working conditions means that the education of your child WILL be affected for the worse and not better!
Top of the list of school closures is Smithills. This school IS an academy.
[quote][p][bold]BWFC71[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]atlas123[/bold] wrote: Teachers, one of the few professions Maggie didnt get around to sorting out[/p][/quote]If our working conditions were changed without prior knowledge and for the worst what would YOU do? Lets put it this way what are the schools that are closing are not yet "academies" and still part of the Council's remit? whilst the teachers at academies are paid almost 1/3 more with far better working conditions! If a council-run school has to be good then t has to keep the teachers and even create more teaching posts thus increasing the wage bill to keep inline with teachers pay in thee private sector or are you not bothered that the standard of teaching will be lower because of the class sizes - the less in the class the better the standard!!! Anyway read the report - they are striking over working conditions which WILL affect your children, therefore you should be supporting the teachers. As for your comment, JustBecause, when can they strike to make an impact and show what is going wrong if they were not allowed to strike during teaching time? Remember the change in working conditions means that the education of your child WILL be affected for the worse and not better![/p][/quote]Top of the list of school closures is Smithills. This school IS an academy. Hollieanne
  • Score: 2

10:27am Tue 18 Mar 14

Rememberscarborough says...

When you think of the likes of teachers, nurses, police etc do you think of them sat behind a desk or do you think of them dealing with people? If you want them to deal with people then you have to cut the paperwork down and accept that there won't be a paper trail if you want to sue them?

All this paperwork comes down to the legal system and we need to change that if we want more people in our front line services.
When you think of the likes of teachers, nurses, police etc do you think of them sat behind a desk or do you think of them dealing with people? If you want them to deal with people then you have to cut the paperwork down and accept that there won't be a paper trail if you want to sue them? All this paperwork comes down to the legal system and we need to change that if we want more people in our front line services. Rememberscarborough
  • Score: 10

10:29am Tue 18 Mar 14

BWFC71 says...

boltonchap wrote:
BWFC71 wrote:
Albinosupport wrote: Not the best time to strike, but there never is a 'best' time. What about all the year 11 students who are getting ready for their exams and need all the tuition they can get at the moment, not ideal. I understand that they have not had a pay rise, neither have I, and I am on even less at just above minimum wage but I can't go on strike. Good on those schools that are staying open.
This is not about pay - please read the news report. It is about the change in working conditions which means even more paperwork, for Ofsted, and in turn means less teaching time - does this mean that the teachers assistants have more of a role (i.e. unprofessional people teaching children?) More paperwork equates to less teaching time and less of teacher getting to know how children are doing and in turn not being able to help children that require the help! Thu creating an new underclass of even less educated children!
It is about pay. Read the article: " Members of the National Union of Teachers will hold the national strike on Wednesday, March 26, as part of a long-running dispute over pay, pensions and conditions ".
You read the article properly!!! This actual strike is NOT about the pay or pensions! Although the Union is also fighting against the proposed illegal changes in that sphere as well!

Julia Simpkins, secretary of the Bolton-branch of the National Union of Teachers (NUT), said: “This strike is about teachers and children.

“TEACHERS' WORKLOAD IS INCREASING AND WE ARE BEING KEPT AWAY FROM THE CLASSROOM. THIS IS NOT GOOD FOR STUDENTS."

“All we want to do is teach rather than complete paperwork, which is mainly for Ofsted, which is more interested in that than teaching.”
[quote][p][bold]boltonchap[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]BWFC71[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Albinosupport[/bold] wrote: Not the best time to strike, but there never is a 'best' time. What about all the year 11 students who are getting ready for their exams and need all the tuition they can get at the moment, not ideal. I understand that they have not had a pay rise, neither have I, and I am on even less at just above minimum wage but I can't go on strike. Good on those schools that are staying open.[/p][/quote]This is not about pay - please read the news report. It is about the change in working conditions which means even more paperwork, for Ofsted, and in turn means less teaching time - does this mean that the teachers assistants have more of a role (i.e. unprofessional people teaching children?) More paperwork equates to less teaching time and less of teacher getting to know how children are doing and in turn not being able to help children that require the help! Thu creating an new underclass of even less educated children![/p][/quote]It is about pay. Read the article: " Members of the National Union of Teachers will hold the national strike on Wednesday, March 26, as part of a long-running dispute over pay, pensions and conditions ".[/p][/quote]You read the article properly!!! This actual strike is NOT about the pay or pensions! Although the Union is also fighting against the proposed illegal changes in that sphere as well! Julia Simpkins, secretary of the Bolton-branch of the National Union of Teachers (NUT), said: “This strike is about teachers and children. “TEACHERS' WORKLOAD IS INCREASING AND WE ARE BEING KEPT AWAY FROM THE CLASSROOM. THIS IS NOT GOOD FOR STUDENTS." “All we want to do is teach rather than complete paperwork, which is mainly for Ofsted, which is more interested in that than teaching.” BWFC71
  • Score: 1

10:29am Tue 18 Mar 14

Balboa says...

BWFC71 wrote:
Balboa wrote:
Just sack them. Had enough of moaning, whingeing, complaining, ungrateful teachers anyway. They never appreciate anything and want it all their own way, being told what to do by their union masters, who incidentally take part of the teachers' salary in subscriptions and funding.
Funny you were possibly taught by the exact same teachers and look ho you have turned out - actually saying that....

It seems you do not understand the situation - teachers working conditions are changing because of more paperwork involved which will, actually, take them away from teaching!!!! So who is going to teach the children whilst the teachers are having to do the paperwork?

These same working conditions are NOT being applied to teachers in academies - why is that?
The teaching profession - as any other - must gradually evolve and that will encompass a change in teaching styles, to reflect the changes in children, society and how attitudes/methods of teaching. It can't remain static otherwise we'd all be on slates and chalk, as preferred by labour. That will happen regardless of the party in government. So the teachers know full well their "method" of working will vary throughout their career.

The majority of schools engage well-trained teaching assistants to help the kids with various aspects of school life and education, and to reduce the teachers daily "teaching" burden - do the teachers volunteer any salary sacrifice to reflect that reduced workload??!!
[quote][p][bold]BWFC71[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Balboa[/bold] wrote: Just sack them. Had enough of moaning, whingeing, complaining, ungrateful teachers anyway. They never appreciate anything and want it all their own way, being told what to do by their union masters, who incidentally take part of the teachers' salary in subscriptions and funding.[/p][/quote]Funny you were possibly taught by the exact same teachers and look ho you have turned out - actually saying that.... It seems you do not understand the situation - teachers working conditions are changing because of more paperwork involved which will, actually, take them away from teaching!!!! So who is going to teach the children whilst the teachers are having to do the paperwork? These same working conditions are NOT being applied to teachers in academies - why is that?[/p][/quote]The teaching profession - as any other - must gradually evolve and that will encompass a change in teaching styles, to reflect the changes in children, society and how attitudes/methods of teaching. It can't remain static otherwise we'd all be on slates and chalk, as preferred by labour. That will happen regardless of the party in government. So the teachers know full well their "method" of working will vary throughout their career. The majority of schools engage well-trained teaching assistants to help the kids with various aspects of school life and education, and to reduce the teachers daily "teaching" burden - do the teachers volunteer any salary sacrifice to reflect that reduced workload??!! Balboa
  • Score: -7

10:48am Tue 18 Mar 14

thomas222 says...

Wish i was a pound behind them.
Wish i was a pound behind them. thomas222
  • Score: 2

11:10am Tue 18 Mar 14

MrBenggo says...

Every one has a right to with draw their labour,unless it is in their contract of employment to say otherwise.
The working people of this country are sick of governments making conditions of unemployment worse and worse,I say good luck to them.
Every one has a right to with draw their labour,unless it is in their contract of employment to say otherwise. The working people of this country are sick of governments making conditions of unemployment worse and worse,I say good luck to them. MrBenggo
  • Score: 14

11:23am Tue 18 Mar 14

BWFC71 says...

Balboa wrote:
BWFC71 wrote:
Balboa wrote: Just sack them. Had enough of moaning, whingeing, complaining, ungrateful teachers anyway. They never appreciate anything and want it all their own way, being told what to do by their union masters, who incidentally take part of the teachers' salary in subscriptions and funding.
Funny you were possibly taught by the exact same teachers and look ho you have turned out - actually saying that.... It seems you do not understand the situation - teachers working conditions are changing because of more paperwork involved which will, actually, take them away from teaching!!!! So who is going to teach the children whilst the teachers are having to do the paperwork? These same working conditions are NOT being applied to teachers in academies - why is that?
The teaching profession - as any other - must gradually evolve and that will encompass a change in teaching styles, to reflect the changes in children, society and how attitudes/methods of teaching. It can't remain static otherwise we'd all be on slates and chalk, as preferred by labour. That will happen regardless of the party in government. So the teachers know full well their "method" of working will vary throughout their career. The majority of schools engage well-trained teaching assistants to help the kids with various aspects of school life and education, and to reduce the teachers daily "teaching" burden - do the teachers volunteer any salary sacrifice to reflect that reduced workload??!!
Teaching assistants are NOT teachers - they are not qualified to be teachers but to assist the teacher.

A teachers role is to educate the children in their care/year through examples, help and various exercises which is planned before the beginning of the school year and has to keep with the syllabus which is provided by Ofsted. The biggest most positive change was the introduction of Key Stage levels which guidelines as to where a child ought to be when the end of the Key Stage has been reached, plus the allowance of children with exceptional needs to be catered within a "normal" schooling atmosphere thus reducing the discrimination in adult life, and same goes for the multi-faith schools!

But lets not forget that the time spent in front of a class is not 100& of the teachers role. There is all the marking that has to be done and that can be up to 300 individual pieces of work each day, as well as the lesson planning, individual child lesson planning, reports, parents night, lesson preparations, pre-school activities, post-school activities, Ofsted reporting on a lesson by lesson basis, daily basis and yearly basis, and then there are the Inset days during term time and during "school" holidays which train teachers on new procedures, on how changes can effect children, new curriculum, and generally helping to keep standards up to date and progressive and well as being positive for the children.

The assistant were brought in to help the teachers workload which INCREASED due to various paperwork that has to be done for Ofsted and the various LEA's and now that paper work is being increased 4 fold thus taking even more time away from their main priority of teaching children.

The belief that a teachers workload has been decreased through the use of Teaching assistants is completely untrue and as matter of fact more and more is being piled onto the teachers workload and they want to give even more paperwork on top of what they have to do already is just completely unbelievable!!! A teacher is there to teach and not to be an administrative assistant, which it is fast becoming!
[quote][p][bold]Balboa[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]BWFC71[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Balboa[/bold] wrote: Just sack them. Had enough of moaning, whingeing, complaining, ungrateful teachers anyway. They never appreciate anything and want it all their own way, being told what to do by their union masters, who incidentally take part of the teachers' salary in subscriptions and funding.[/p][/quote]Funny you were possibly taught by the exact same teachers and look ho you have turned out - actually saying that.... It seems you do not understand the situation - teachers working conditions are changing because of more paperwork involved which will, actually, take them away from teaching!!!! So who is going to teach the children whilst the teachers are having to do the paperwork? These same working conditions are NOT being applied to teachers in academies - why is that?[/p][/quote]The teaching profession - as any other - must gradually evolve and that will encompass a change in teaching styles, to reflect the changes in children, society and how attitudes/methods of teaching. It can't remain static otherwise we'd all be on slates and chalk, as preferred by labour. That will happen regardless of the party in government. So the teachers know full well their "method" of working will vary throughout their career. The majority of schools engage well-trained teaching assistants to help the kids with various aspects of school life and education, and to reduce the teachers daily "teaching" burden - do the teachers volunteer any salary sacrifice to reflect that reduced workload??!![/p][/quote]Teaching assistants are NOT teachers - they are not qualified to be teachers but to assist the teacher. A teachers role is to educate the children in their care/year through examples, help and various exercises which is planned before the beginning of the school year and has to keep with the syllabus which is provided by Ofsted. The biggest most positive change was the introduction of Key Stage levels which guidelines as to where a child ought to be when the end of the Key Stage has been reached, plus the allowance of children with exceptional needs to be catered within a "normal" schooling atmosphere thus reducing the discrimination in adult life, and same goes for the multi-faith schools! But lets not forget that the time spent in front of a class is not 100& of the teachers role. There is all the marking that has to be done and that can be up to 300 individual pieces of work each day, as well as the lesson planning, individual child lesson planning, reports, parents night, lesson preparations, pre-school activities, post-school activities, Ofsted reporting on a lesson by lesson basis, daily basis and yearly basis, and then there are the Inset days during term time and during "school" holidays which train teachers on new procedures, on how changes can effect children, new curriculum, and generally helping to keep standards up to date and progressive and well as being positive for the children. The assistant were brought in to help the teachers workload which INCREASED due to various paperwork that has to be done for Ofsted and the various LEA's and now that paper work is being increased 4 fold thus taking even more time away from their main priority of teaching children. The belief that a teachers workload has been decreased through the use of Teaching assistants is completely untrue and as matter of fact more and more is being piled onto the teachers workload and they want to give even more paperwork on top of what they have to do already is just completely unbelievable!!! A teacher is there to teach and not to be an administrative assistant, which it is fast becoming! BWFC71
  • Score: 11

11:41am Tue 18 Mar 14

BWFC71 says...

atlas123 wrote:
BWFC71 wrote:
atlas123 wrote: Teachers, one of the few professions Maggie didnt get around to sorting out
If our working conditions were changed without prior knowledge and for the worst what would YOU do? Lets put it this way what are the schools that are closing are not yet "academies" and still part of the Council's remit? whilst the teachers at academies are paid almost 1/3 more with far better working conditions! If a council-run school has to be good then t has to keep the teachers and even create more teaching posts thus increasing the wage bill to keep inline with teachers pay in thee private sector or are you not bothered that the standard of teaching will be lower because of the class sizes - the less in the class the better the standard!!! Anyway read the report - they are striking over working conditions which WILL affect your children, therefore you should be supporting the teachers. As for your comment, JustBecause, when can they strike to make an impact and show what is going wrong if they were not allowed to strike during teaching time? Remember the change in working conditions means that the education of your child WILL be affected for the worse and not better!
I Suspect the lack of schooling will affect the kids more than any changes. If the teachersdon't like the t and c they are free to move or seek alternative employment. I did. And as it stands I have had no pay rise for three years and have been told not to expect one for two more, whilst those on minimum wage working for the same group will shortley get an inflation busting rise. Life is like that sometimes. Teachers in particular, but most people who work in the public sector have noidea what life is like in the real wworld!
So state schools lose the best teachers to academies, public schools, and other careers thus leaving the "principled" teachers and teachers who are only okay, because state schools shouldn't be competitive!!!

How is that going to improve children's education in this country?

Lets put it this way

Pay: Not had an increase in 5 years in line with the Private Sector
Pension: Illegally withdrawn current package and put on a lower one. Legally they should have kept the original packages going for those not changing contract, but change to the lesser pension when sign a new contract or gain promotion or start a new job - like in the private sector!!!
Conditions: More and more paperwork - so much so that it is no longer a teaching role nowadays but an administrative role! Not knowing what they should be teaching come September as the Government don't know what they are doing - GCCSE's or Baccalaureate's, plus no curriculum set up and no text books. Plus no direction/purpose/pl
an for the rise of compulsory education which now end 17 from this school year and 18 from next school year!!!

So you have fallen for the Tory trap of thinking that the Public Sector is in a world of its own? over 5 million public sector jobs lost over the last 5 years with at least another 2-3 million over next couple of years says different. Illegally having their pensions changed, says differently, no pay increases for last 6 years say differently! Plus lets not forget that whether Public or Private they have to abide to the employment laws!!!
[quote][p][bold]atlas123[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]BWFC71[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]atlas123[/bold] wrote: Teachers, one of the few professions Maggie didnt get around to sorting out[/p][/quote]If our working conditions were changed without prior knowledge and for the worst what would YOU do? Lets put it this way what are the schools that are closing are not yet "academies" and still part of the Council's remit? whilst the teachers at academies are paid almost 1/3 more with far better working conditions! If a council-run school has to be good then t has to keep the teachers and even create more teaching posts thus increasing the wage bill to keep inline with teachers pay in thee private sector or are you not bothered that the standard of teaching will be lower because of the class sizes - the less in the class the better the standard!!! Anyway read the report - they are striking over working conditions which WILL affect your children, therefore you should be supporting the teachers. As for your comment, JustBecause, when can they strike to make an impact and show what is going wrong if they were not allowed to strike during teaching time? Remember the change in working conditions means that the education of your child WILL be affected for the worse and not better![/p][/quote]I Suspect the lack of schooling will affect the kids more than any changes. If the teachersdon't like the t and c they are free to move or seek alternative employment. I did. And as it stands I have had no pay rise for three years and have been told not to expect one for two more, whilst those on minimum wage working for the same group will shortley get an inflation busting rise. Life is like that sometimes. Teachers in particular, but most people who work in the public sector have noidea what life is like in the real wworld![/p][/quote]So state schools lose the best teachers to academies, public schools, and other careers thus leaving the "principled" teachers and teachers who are only okay, because state schools shouldn't be competitive!!! How is that going to improve children's education in this country? Lets put it this way Pay: Not had an increase in 5 years in line with the Private Sector Pension: Illegally withdrawn current package and put on a lower one. Legally they should have kept the original packages going for those not changing contract, but change to the lesser pension when sign a new contract or gain promotion or start a new job - like in the private sector!!! Conditions: More and more paperwork - so much so that it is no longer a teaching role nowadays but an administrative role! Not knowing what they should be teaching come September as the Government don't know what they are doing - GCCSE's or Baccalaureate's, plus no curriculum set up and no text books. Plus no direction/purpose/pl an for the rise of compulsory education which now end 17 from this school year and 18 from next school year!!! So you have fallen for the Tory trap of thinking that the Public Sector is in a world of its own? over 5 million public sector jobs lost over the last 5 years with at least another 2-3 million over next couple of years says different. Illegally having their pensions changed, says differently, no pay increases for last 6 years say differently! Plus lets not forget that whether Public or Private they have to abide to the employment laws!!! BWFC71
  • Score: -5

11:47am Tue 18 Mar 14

wellIhopeso says...

Surely teachers more than anybody should understand the need for help by the "bosses" to record what they do when at work so the “bosses” can plan sensibly for the "output". Objecting to "doing paperwork" is just an objection to being held accountable for their actions when working. Just imagine if a production worker went on strike because of objection to "filling in" a time sheet accounting for the time they are working, it would be considered laughable. Where is the “teamwork” in the schools???
Surely teachers more than anybody should understand the need for help by the "bosses" to record what they do when at work so the “bosses” can plan sensibly for the "output". Objecting to "doing paperwork" is just an objection to being held accountable for their actions when working. Just imagine if a production worker went on strike because of objection to "filling in" a time sheet accounting for the time they are working, it would be considered laughable. Where is the “teamwork” in the schools??? wellIhopeso
  • Score: -8

11:49am Tue 18 Mar 14

MrBenggo says...

"Divide and conquer"and old phrase but so very true,public sector against private sector,young against old,employed against unemployed and able bodied against disabled.
That's the Tory philosophy.
"Divide and conquer"and old phrase but so very true,public sector against private sector,young against old,employed against unemployed and able bodied against disabled. That's the Tory philosophy. MrBenggo
  • Score: 8

12:29pm Tue 18 Mar 14

BWFC71 says...

wellIhopeso wrote:
Surely teachers more than anybody should understand the need for help by the "bosses" to record what they do when at work so the “bosses” can plan sensibly for the "output". Objecting to "doing paperwork" is just an objection to being held accountable for their actions when working. Just imagine if a production worker went on strike because of objection to "filling in" a time sheet accounting for the time they are working, it would be considered laughable. Where is the “teamwork” in the schools???
But when their paperwork ha increased by 25 fold in the last 10 years because Ofsted what every minor detail being detailed.

There is teamwork but how can one teacher write up the paperwork for another teacher when they are teaching different things, and same goes for the lesson plans, individual lesson plans, report writing etc etc etc.

Example; Year 3 teacher having to do the paperwork of a Year 5 teacher but they are teaching different classes and different parts of the syllabus and different children with different abilities or vice versa - it cannot be done. A teacher knows their pupils and abilities, which change year on year and the reports have to be so detailed only a class teacher can fill in the prescribed forms and reports.
[quote][p][bold]wellIhopeso[/bold] wrote: Surely teachers more than anybody should understand the need for help by the "bosses" to record what they do when at work so the “bosses” can plan sensibly for the "output". Objecting to "doing paperwork" is just an objection to being held accountable for their actions when working. Just imagine if a production worker went on strike because of objection to "filling in" a time sheet accounting for the time they are working, it would be considered laughable. Where is the “teamwork” in the schools???[/p][/quote]But when their paperwork ha increased by 25 fold in the last 10 years because Ofsted what every minor detail being detailed. There is teamwork but how can one teacher write up the paperwork for another teacher when they are teaching different things, and same goes for the lesson plans, individual lesson plans, report writing etc etc etc. Example; Year 3 teacher having to do the paperwork of a Year 5 teacher but they are teaching different classes and different parts of the syllabus and different children with different abilities or vice versa - it cannot be done. A teacher knows their pupils and abilities, which change year on year and the reports have to be so detailed only a class teacher can fill in the prescribed forms and reports. BWFC71
  • Score: 4

1:00pm Tue 18 Mar 14

Albinosupport says...

BWFC71 wrote:
Albinosupport wrote:
Not the best time to strike, but there never is a 'best' time. What about all the year 11 students who are getting ready for their exams and need all the tuition they can get at the moment, not ideal. I understand that they have not had a pay rise, neither have I, and I am on even less at just above minimum wage but I can't go on strike. Good on those schools that are staying open.
This is not about pay - please read the news report.

It is about the change in working conditions which means even more paperwork, for Ofsted, and in turn means less teaching time - does this mean that the teachers assistants have more of a role (i.e. unprofessional people teaching children?)

More paperwork equates to less teaching time and less of teacher getting to know how children are doing and in turn not being able to help children that require the help! Thu creating an new underclass of even less educated children!
I can read, thank you!

Teachers — members of the NUT and the NASUWT, National Association of Schoolmasters and Union of Women Teachers — at more than 120 schools in Bolton became the first in the country to strike in protest over pay, pensions and conditions last June as part of a rolling programme of regional strikes.

Members of the National Union of Teachers will hold the national strike on Wednesday, March 26, as part of a long-running dispute over pay, pensions and conditions.

I was not criticising the teachers either, I was just saying it was not the best time to strike.
[quote][p][bold]BWFC71[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Albinosupport[/bold] wrote: Not the best time to strike, but there never is a 'best' time. What about all the year 11 students who are getting ready for their exams and need all the tuition they can get at the moment, not ideal. I understand that they have not had a pay rise, neither have I, and I am on even less at just above minimum wage but I can't go on strike. Good on those schools that are staying open.[/p][/quote]This is not about pay - please read the news report. It is about the change in working conditions which means even more paperwork, for Ofsted, and in turn means less teaching time - does this mean that the teachers assistants have more of a role (i.e. unprofessional people teaching children?) More paperwork equates to less teaching time and less of teacher getting to know how children are doing and in turn not being able to help children that require the help! Thu creating an new underclass of even less educated children![/p][/quote]I can read, thank you! Teachers — members of the NUT and the NASUWT, National Association of Schoolmasters and Union of Women Teachers — at more than 120 schools in Bolton became the first in the country to strike in protest over pay, pensions and conditions last June as part of a rolling programme of regional strikes. Members of the National Union of Teachers will hold the national strike on Wednesday, March 26, as part of a long-running dispute over pay, pensions and conditions. I was not criticising the teachers either, I was just saying it was not the best time to strike. Albinosupport
  • Score: 1

1:15pm Tue 18 Mar 14

BWFC71 says...

Albinosupport wrote:
BWFC71 wrote:
Albinosupport wrote: Not the best time to strike, but there never is a 'best' time. What about all the year 11 students who are getting ready for their exams and need all the tuition they can get at the moment, not ideal. I understand that they have not had a pay rise, neither have I, and I am on even less at just above minimum wage but I can't go on strike. Good on those schools that are staying open.
This is not about pay - please read the news report. It is about the change in working conditions which means even more paperwork, for Ofsted, and in turn means less teaching time - does this mean that the teachers assistants have more of a role (i.e. unprofessional people teaching children?) More paperwork equates to less teaching time and less of teacher getting to know how children are doing and in turn not being able to help children that require the help! Thu creating an new underclass of even less educated children!
I can read, thank you! Teachers — members of the NUT and the NASUWT, National Association of Schoolmasters and Union of Women Teachers — at more than 120 schools in Bolton became the first in the country to strike in protest over pay, pensions and conditions last June as part of a rolling programme of regional strikes. Members of the National Union of Teachers will hold the national strike on Wednesday, March 26, as part of a long-running dispute over pay, pensions and conditions. I was not criticising the teachers either, I was just saying it was not the best time to strike.
When is the best tie to strike?

Not during school holidays as then it does not highlight the teachers plight, only taking action whilst schools are in will people sit up and take notice - some are blinded by thee PR of the Tories and some are realistic enough to realise whatever happens to teachers does have an effect on their children!!!
[quote][p][bold]Albinosupport[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]BWFC71[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Albinosupport[/bold] wrote: Not the best time to strike, but there never is a 'best' time. What about all the year 11 students who are getting ready for their exams and need all the tuition they can get at the moment, not ideal. I understand that they have not had a pay rise, neither have I, and I am on even less at just above minimum wage but I can't go on strike. Good on those schools that are staying open.[/p][/quote]This is not about pay - please read the news report. It is about the change in working conditions which means even more paperwork, for Ofsted, and in turn means less teaching time - does this mean that the teachers assistants have more of a role (i.e. unprofessional people teaching children?) More paperwork equates to less teaching time and less of teacher getting to know how children are doing and in turn not being able to help children that require the help! Thu creating an new underclass of even less educated children![/p][/quote]I can read, thank you! Teachers — members of the NUT and the NASUWT, National Association of Schoolmasters and Union of Women Teachers — at more than 120 schools in Bolton became the first in the country to strike in protest over pay, pensions and conditions last June as part of a rolling programme of regional strikes. Members of the National Union of Teachers will hold the national strike on Wednesday, March 26, as part of a long-running dispute over pay, pensions and conditions. I was not criticising the teachers either, I was just saying it was not the best time to strike.[/p][/quote]When is the best tie to strike? Not during school holidays as then it does not highlight the teachers plight, only taking action whilst schools are in will people sit up and take notice - some are blinded by thee PR of the Tories and some are realistic enough to realise whatever happens to teachers does have an effect on their children!!! BWFC71
  • Score: -9

1:22pm Tue 18 Mar 14

goldie47 says...

not satisfied with big pay packets/long holidays and days off during school time they want to go on strike once again.....many many people are worse off.....get real
not satisfied with big pay packets/long holidays and days off during school time they want to go on strike once again.....many many people are worse off.....get real goldie47
  • Score: -8

1:58pm Tue 18 Mar 14

BWFC71 says...

goldie47 wrote:
not satisfied with big pay packets/long holidays and days off during school time they want to go on strike once again.....many many people are worse off.....get real
Long holiday?

where?

During the 6 weeks in summer they are in for 4 weeks planning for the next school year, making sure their records are up to date, preparing for new intakes and courses on changes to the curriculum and teaching experience.

during half-terms its about catch-up on the reports, preparations for parents evenings (which normally take place soon after half-terms), preparations of lessons for the next half f term
.
But lets not forget the amount of work they do outside the teaching hours which adds up, in total, to almost 60hours a week and as they do not get overtime it is done through the extra days off!!! If you did well above the 40 hours work wouldn't you want either overtime or days off????

Big pay packets? Are you sure about that.. Teachers pay in the UK is one of the smallest in the world!!!!!! Teachers in Australia are paid twice as much as they do here. Teachers pay in the US is 1/3 more than in the UK. Teachers pay in The Netherlands is 150% more than here, teachers pay in china and Japan (which have the longest teaching hours in the world) are paid over 200% more than here!!!!! Even in France, Germany and Ireland the pay is more than here!!!!

In a competitive world they have to pay for the services or they lose the teachers to either the public schools or overseas. Thus leaving the okay and mediocre teachers to do the job and do you want your children to be taught by the not-so-best teachers????

It is about time many people who are not teachers got real and realise what job they do, how its done and what they have to do rather than just thinking it is a 9am to 3pm job, which it isn't!

Think back to when you were a child at school and how much you learned from your teachers, such as reading, writing, arithmetic - the basic building blocks to your life and you want teachers to do that on the cheap!!! Lets put it this way if it was the private sector and schools were not free how much would you be willing to pay and how much would you have to pay (and I bet there is a big difference).

I would pay anything for my children to be taught as children are our future. Why would we want them to get a mediocre education because we are not willing to pay for the teachers!!!!
[quote][p][bold]goldie47[/bold] wrote: not satisfied with big pay packets/long holidays and days off during school time they want to go on strike once again.....many many people are worse off.....get real[/p][/quote]Long holiday? where? During the 6 weeks in summer they are in for 4 weeks planning for the next school year, making sure their records are up to date, preparing for new intakes and courses on changes to the curriculum and teaching experience. during half-terms its about catch-up on the reports, preparations for parents evenings (which normally take place soon after half-terms), preparations of lessons for the next half f term . But lets not forget the amount of work they do outside the teaching hours which adds up, in total, to almost 60hours a week and as they do not get overtime it is done through the extra days off!!! If you did well above the 40 hours work wouldn't you want either overtime or days off???? Big pay packets? Are you sure about that.. Teachers pay in the UK is one of the smallest in the world!!!!!! Teachers in Australia are paid twice as much as they do here. Teachers pay in the US is 1/3 more than in the UK. Teachers pay in The Netherlands is 150% more than here, teachers pay in china and Japan (which have the longest teaching hours in the world) are paid over 200% more than here!!!!! Even in France, Germany and Ireland the pay is more than here!!!! In a competitive world they have to pay for the services or they lose the teachers to either the public schools or overseas. Thus leaving the okay and mediocre teachers to do the job and do you want your children to be taught by the not-so-best teachers???? It is about time many people who are not teachers got real and realise what job they do, how its done and what they have to do rather than just thinking it is a 9am to 3pm job, which it isn't! Think back to when you were a child at school and how much you learned from your teachers, such as reading, writing, arithmetic - the basic building blocks to your life and you want teachers to do that on the cheap!!! Lets put it this way if it was the private sector and schools were not free how much would you be willing to pay and how much would you have to pay (and I bet there is a big difference). I would pay anything for my children to be taught as children are our future. Why would we want them to get a mediocre education because we are not willing to pay for the teachers!!!! BWFC71
  • Score: 9

2:06pm Tue 18 Mar 14

BWFC71 says...

How much of your council tax goes towards education?

Then consider if you had to pay privately for education - Bolton School for instance...

School Fee Senior School (including the Sixth Form) £3,499 per term
Junior School £2,747 per term
Infant School £2,747 per term

Are you willing to pay up to £10,497 per annum for your child education?

Or what about Lords School (which cater for less than 100 pupils in total) and the annual cost being £5280.

Then lets not forget when in the private sector to gain entry one has to sit exams and undertake an "informal" and "formal" interviews.

But what do you do if you cannot get into school?
How much of your council tax goes towards education? Then consider if you had to pay privately for education - Bolton School for instance... School Fee Senior School (including the Sixth Form) £3,499 per term Junior School £2,747 per term Infant School £2,747 per term Are you willing to pay up to £10,497 per annum for your child education? Or what about Lords School (which cater for less than 100 pupils in total) and the annual cost being £5280. Then lets not forget when in the private sector to gain entry one has to sit exams and undertake an "informal" and "formal" interviews. But what do you do if you cannot get into school? BWFC71
  • Score: 0

2:08pm Tue 18 Mar 14

Iluminati says...

Well well. The teachers are at it again. This time it's the paperwork. Next time is something else, any excuse to strike ! Too much paperwork equates to too much pressure, but no pressure at all in taking a fistful of over generous holidays and a more then generous pension scheme. On top of all this, a well organised strike is always welcome and eases the pressure. What a lot of spoiled people they're. Next time I come onto this world, I definitely want to become a teacher!!!!!!!!!
Well well. The teachers are at it again. This time it's the paperwork. Next time is something else, any excuse to strike ! Too much paperwork equates to too much pressure, but no pressure at all in taking a fistful of over generous holidays and a more then generous pension scheme. On top of all this, a well organised strike is always welcome and eases the pressure. What a lot of spoiled people they're. Next time I come onto this world, I definitely want to become a teacher!!!!!!!!! Iluminati
  • Score: -6

2:15pm Tue 18 Mar 14

BWFC71 says...

Iluminati wrote:
Well well. The teachers are at it again. This time it's the paperwork. Next time is something else, any excuse to strike ! Too much paperwork equates to too much pressure, but no pressure at all in taking a fistful of over generous holidays and a more then generous pension scheme. On top of all this, a well organised strike is always welcome and eases the pressure. What a lot of spoiled people they're. Next time I come onto this world, I definitely want to become a teacher!!!!!!!!!
Tell me where the generous holiday are please.

As I have stated above. during the summer holiday they only get 2 weeks, Half term is taken over with paperwork. And they don't even get full allocation of holiday at Christmas or Easter.

Any extra they do get is offset by the hours they do, in total, (both teaching time and non-teaching time) equates to above 60 hours a week - so would you be willing to do 60 hours a week without overtime or days off in lieu?

Find out what teachers actually do before making a sweeping statement like that, which is totally false!
[quote][p][bold]Iluminati[/bold] wrote: Well well. The teachers are at it again. This time it's the paperwork. Next time is something else, any excuse to strike ! Too much paperwork equates to too much pressure, but no pressure at all in taking a fistful of over generous holidays and a more then generous pension scheme. On top of all this, a well organised strike is always welcome and eases the pressure. What a lot of spoiled people they're. Next time I come onto this world, I definitely want to become a teacher!!!!!!!!![/p][/quote]Tell me where the generous holiday are please. As I have stated above. during the summer holiday they only get 2 weeks, Half term is taken over with paperwork. And they don't even get full allocation of holiday at Christmas or Easter. Any extra they do get is offset by the hours they do, in total, (both teaching time and non-teaching time) equates to above 60 hours a week - so would you be willing to do 60 hours a week without overtime or days off in lieu? Find out what teachers actually do before making a sweeping statement like that, which is totally false! BWFC71
  • Score: -19

3:54pm Tue 18 Mar 14

stereo_world says...

breightmet kid wrote:
Teachers have very good jobs, well paid, with secure pensions. What more do they want? I think they should be paid on results of their efforts, that is on how well their pupils do in the examinations. The vast majority of schools in Bolton under perform, as the published figures show, so teachers salaries should be re-assessed to show this. Also how many children are leaving school unable to read, write or add up properly? Another reflection on poor teaching standards.

Get back to work and do the job properly, our kids lives depend on you.
You ever taught before? Thought not.
[quote][p][bold]breightmet kid[/bold] wrote: Teachers have very good jobs, well paid, with secure pensions. What more do they want? I think they should be paid on results of their efforts, that is on how well their pupils do in the examinations. The vast majority of schools in Bolton under perform, as the published figures show, so teachers salaries should be re-assessed to show this. Also how many children are leaving school unable to read, write or add up properly? Another reflection on poor teaching standards. Get back to work and do the job properly, our kids lives depend on you.[/p][/quote]You ever taught before? Thought not. stereo_world
  • Score: 4

4:53pm Tue 18 Mar 14

Jim271 says...

Can I get a rebate on my Council Tax then?
Can I get a rebate on my Council Tax then? Jim271
  • Score: 0

5:24pm Tue 18 Mar 14

Gore Seer says...

BWFC71 wrote:
Gore Seer wrote:
Pay And Pensions Are Fantastic And The Tax Free Lump Sum. My Ex Girlfriend Got A £38,000 Tax Free, She Retired At the Age Of 52, Now On Top Of Her School Pension,She Gets State Pen She Is Quids In.She Taught First Year Infants And Had Two Helpers, Me I Was A Monkey I Had To Work 60 Hour Weeks For Peanuts.
But if you had stayed at school and took on the profession, instead of knocking it then you would have also been paid the same.

You only get out of life what you put into it! For you, education was a big plan but that meant you were sidelined for so many decently paid jobs and hence you haven't really got that far in life - possibly you are happy with that, who knows, but do not knock people because of their choice of profession and how they have progressed!
We Are In A Recession I Have Been Force More Than Once To Strike For a Fare Deal As I Lost Out To Cuts, Teachers Never Supported The Worker.
[quote][p][bold]BWFC71[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Gore Seer[/bold] wrote: Pay And Pensions Are Fantastic And The Tax Free Lump Sum. My Ex Girlfriend Got A £38,000 Tax Free, She Retired At the Age Of 52, Now On Top Of Her School Pension,She Gets State Pen She Is Quids In.She Taught First Year Infants And Had Two Helpers, Me I Was A Monkey I Had To Work 60 Hour Weeks For Peanuts.[/p][/quote]But if you had stayed at school and took on the profession, instead of knocking it then you would have also been paid the same. You only get out of life what you put into it! For you, education was a big plan but that meant you were sidelined for so many decently paid jobs and hence you haven't really got that far in life - possibly you are happy with that, who knows, but do not knock people because of their choice of profession and how they have progressed![/p][/quote]We Are In A Recession I Have Been Force More Than Once To Strike For a Fare Deal As I Lost Out To Cuts, Teachers Never Supported The Worker. Gore Seer
  • Score: -2

5:37pm Tue 18 Mar 14

BWFC71 says...

Gore Seer wrote:
BWFC71 wrote:
Gore Seer wrote: Pay And Pensions Are Fantastic And The Tax Free Lump Sum. My Ex Girlfriend Got A £38,000 Tax Free, She Retired At the Age Of 52, Now On Top Of Her School Pension,She Gets State Pen She Is Quids In.She Taught First Year Infants And Had Two Helpers, Me I Was A Monkey I Had To Work 60 Hour Weeks For Peanuts.
But if you had stayed at school and took on the profession, instead of knocking it then you would have also been paid the same. You only get out of life what you put into it! For you, education was a big plan but that meant you were sidelined for so many decently paid jobs and hence you haven't really got that far in life - possibly you are happy with that, who knows, but do not knock people because of their choice of profession and how they have progressed!
We Are In A Recession I Have Been Force More Than Once To Strike For a Fare Deal As I Lost Out To Cuts, Teachers Never Supported The Worker.
We are NOT in a recession anymore and haven't been for at least the last 24 months. A recession is when 2 or more financial quarters are in a minus and that hasn't happened for over 2 years!

Yes we have been in a depression and we are slowly coming out of it - and not helped by the fact that the Tories actually sent us back into recession (as before the election we were actually increasing production).

But teaching should be ringfenced along with the NHS as they are the two most basic necessities a human requires - NHS for health and Teacher for education to train the children of today to be a success in all that they do tomorrow!
[quote][p][bold]Gore Seer[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]BWFC71[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Gore Seer[/bold] wrote: Pay And Pensions Are Fantastic And The Tax Free Lump Sum. My Ex Girlfriend Got A £38,000 Tax Free, She Retired At the Age Of 52, Now On Top Of Her School Pension,She Gets State Pen She Is Quids In.She Taught First Year Infants And Had Two Helpers, Me I Was A Monkey I Had To Work 60 Hour Weeks For Peanuts.[/p][/quote]But if you had stayed at school and took on the profession, instead of knocking it then you would have also been paid the same. You only get out of life what you put into it! For you, education was a big plan but that meant you were sidelined for so many decently paid jobs and hence you haven't really got that far in life - possibly you are happy with that, who knows, but do not knock people because of their choice of profession and how they have progressed![/p][/quote]We Are In A Recession I Have Been Force More Than Once To Strike For a Fare Deal As I Lost Out To Cuts, Teachers Never Supported The Worker.[/p][/quote]We are NOT in a recession anymore and haven't been for at least the last 24 months. A recession is when 2 or more financial quarters are in a minus and that hasn't happened for over 2 years! Yes we have been in a depression and we are slowly coming out of it - and not helped by the fact that the Tories actually sent us back into recession (as before the election we were actually increasing production). But teaching should be ringfenced along with the NHS as they are the two most basic necessities a human requires - NHS for health and Teacher for education to train the children of today to be a success in all that they do tomorrow! BWFC71
  • Score: -34

5:51pm Tue 18 Mar 14

tillyflop53 says...

Balboa wrote:
Just sack them. Had enough of moaning, whingeing, complaining, ungrateful teachers anyway. They never appreciate anything and want it all their own way, being told what to do by their union masters, who incidentally take part of the teachers' salary in subscriptions and funding.
Have you ever been a teacher? or seen the amount of work a teacher has to do just to prepare lessons. these kind of negative comments helps no one
[quote][p][bold]Balboa[/bold] wrote: Just sack them. Had enough of moaning, whingeing, complaining, ungrateful teachers anyway. They never appreciate anything and want it all their own way, being told what to do by their union masters, who incidentally take part of the teachers' salary in subscriptions and funding.[/p][/quote]Have you ever been a teacher? or seen the amount of work a teacher has to do just to prepare lessons. these kind of negative comments helps no one tillyflop53
  • Score: 5

6:26pm Tue 18 Mar 14

owencoyle99 says...

thomas222 wrote:
Wish i was a pound behind them.
Guess you could have same salary if you had £30000 to go to university and had the brains to be accepted at a university

Reply to that numpty
[quote][p][bold]thomas222[/bold] wrote: Wish i was a pound behind them.[/p][/quote]Guess you could have same salary if you had £30000 to go to university and had the brains to be accepted at a university Reply to that numpty owencoyle99
  • Score: 0

6:30pm Tue 18 Mar 14

owencoyle99 says...

tillyflop53 wrote:
Balboa wrote:
Just sack them. Had enough of moaning, whingeing, complaining, ungrateful teachers anyway. They never appreciate anything and want it all their own way, being told what to do by their union masters, who incidentally take part of the teachers' salary in subscriptions and funding.
Have you ever been a teacher? or seen the amount of work a teacher has to do just to prepare lessons. these kind of negative comments helps no one
Who is going to teach the kids - tillyflop53
But I guess she may have a BSC in knitting
[quote][p][bold]tillyflop53[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Balboa[/bold] wrote: Just sack them. Had enough of moaning, whingeing, complaining, ungrateful teachers anyway. They never appreciate anything and want it all their own way, being told what to do by their union masters, who incidentally take part of the teachers' salary in subscriptions and funding.[/p][/quote]Have you ever been a teacher? or seen the amount of work a teacher has to do just to prepare lessons. these kind of negative comments helps no one[/p][/quote]Who is going to teach the kids - tillyflop53 But I guess she may have a BSC in knitting owencoyle99
  • Score: -1

6:36pm Tue 18 Mar 14

owencoyle99 says...

BWFC71 wrote:
Iluminati wrote:
Well well. The teachers are at it again. This time it's the paperwork. Next time is something else, any excuse to strike ! Too much paperwork equates to too much pressure, but no pressure at all in taking a fistful of over generous holidays and a more then generous pension scheme. On top of all this, a well organised strike is always welcome and eases the pressure. What a lot of spoiled people they're. Next time I come onto this world, I definitely want to become a teacher!!!!!!!!!
Tell me where the generous holiday are please.

As I have stated above. during the summer holiday they only get 2 weeks, Half term is taken over with paperwork. And they don't even get full allocation of holiday at Christmas or Easter.

Any extra they do get is offset by the hours they do, in total, (both teaching time and non-teaching time) equates to above 60 hours a week - so would you be willing to do 60 hours a week without overtime or days off in lieu?

Find out what teachers actually do before making a sweeping statement like that, which is totally false!
You have to get a degree first to teach then save £30000 for university after this you have to pay back the £30000 you borrowed in the first place
[quote][p][bold]BWFC71[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Iluminati[/bold] wrote: Well well. The teachers are at it again. This time it's the paperwork. Next time is something else, any excuse to strike ! Too much paperwork equates to too much pressure, but no pressure at all in taking a fistful of over generous holidays and a more then generous pension scheme. On top of all this, a well organised strike is always welcome and eases the pressure. What a lot of spoiled people they're. Next time I come onto this world, I definitely want to become a teacher!!!!!!!!![/p][/quote]Tell me where the generous holiday are please. As I have stated above. during the summer holiday they only get 2 weeks, Half term is taken over with paperwork. And they don't even get full allocation of holiday at Christmas or Easter. Any extra they do get is offset by the hours they do, in total, (both teaching time and non-teaching time) equates to above 60 hours a week - so would you be willing to do 60 hours a week without overtime or days off in lieu? Find out what teachers actually do before making a sweeping statement like that, which is totally false![/p][/quote]You have to get a degree first to teach then save £30000 for university after this you have to pay back the £30000 you borrowed in the first place owencoyle99
  • Score: 0

6:38pm Tue 18 Mar 14

owencoyle99 says...

Iluminati wrote:
Well well. The teachers are at it again. This time it's the paperwork. Next time is something else, any excuse to strike ! Too much paperwork equates to too much pressure, but no pressure at all in taking a fistful of over generous holidays and a more then generous pension scheme. On top of all this, a well organised strike is always welcome and eases the pressure. What a lot of spoiled people they're. Next time I come onto this world, I definitely want to become a teacher!!!!!!!!!
You have to have a brain first
[quote][p][bold]Iluminati[/bold] wrote: Well well. The teachers are at it again. This time it's the paperwork. Next time is something else, any excuse to strike ! Too much paperwork equates to too much pressure, but no pressure at all in taking a fistful of over generous holidays and a more then generous pension scheme. On top of all this, a well organised strike is always welcome and eases the pressure. What a lot of spoiled people they're. Next time I come onto this world, I definitely want to become a teacher!!!!!!!!![/p][/quote]You have to have a brain first owencoyle99
  • Score: 2

6:43pm Tue 18 Mar 14

owencoyle99 says...

BWFC71 wrote:
atlas123 wrote:
BWFC71 wrote:
atlas123 wrote: Teachers, one of the few professions Maggie didnt get around to sorting out
If our working conditions were changed without prior knowledge and for the worst what would YOU do? Lets put it this way what are the schools that are closing are not yet "academies" and still part of the Council's remit? whilst the teachers at academies are paid almost 1/3 more with far better working conditions! If a council-run school has to be good then t has to keep the teachers and even create more teaching posts thus increasing the wage bill to keep inline with teachers pay in thee private sector or are you not bothered that the standard of teaching will be lower because of the class sizes - the less in the class the better the standard!!! Anyway read the report - they are striking over working conditions which WILL affect your children, therefore you should be supporting the teachers. As for your comment, JustBecause, when can they strike to make an impact and show what is going wrong if they were not allowed to strike during teaching time? Remember the change in working conditions means that the education of your child WILL be affected for the worse and not better!
I Suspect the lack of schooling will affect the kids more than any changes. If the teachersdon't like the t and c they are free to move or seek alternative employment. I did. And as it stands I have had no pay rise for three years and have been told not to expect one for two more, whilst those on minimum wage working for the same group will shortley get an inflation busting rise. Life is like that sometimes. Teachers in particular, but most people who work in the public sector have noidea what life is like in the real wworld!
So state schools lose the best teachers to academies, public schools, and other careers thus leaving the "principled" teachers and teachers who are only okay, because state schools shouldn't be competitive!!!

How is that going to improve children's education in this country?

Lets put it this way

Pay: Not had an increase in 5 years in line with the Private Sector
Pension: Illegally withdrawn current package and put on a lower one. Legally they should have kept the original packages going for those not changing contract, but change to the lesser pension when sign a new contract or gain promotion or start a new job - like in the private sector!!!
Conditions: More and more paperwork - so much so that it is no longer a teaching role nowadays but an administrative role! Not knowing what they should be teaching come September as the Government don't know what they are doing - GCCSE's or Baccalaureate's, plus no curriculum set up and no text books. Plus no direction/purpose/pl

an for the rise of compulsory education which now end 17 from this school year and 18 from next school year!!!

So you have fallen for the Tory trap of thinking that the Public Sector is in a world of its own? over 5 million public sector jobs lost over the last 5 years with at least another 2-3 million over next couple of years says different. Illegally having their pensions changed, says differently, no pay increases for last 6 years say differently! Plus lets not forget that whether Public or Private they have to abide to the employment laws!!!
It is a fact that the public workers are 15% better off than the private sector and have more time on sick than private sector
[quote][p][bold]BWFC71[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]atlas123[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]BWFC71[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]atlas123[/bold] wrote: Teachers, one of the few professions Maggie didnt get around to sorting out[/p][/quote]If our working conditions were changed without prior knowledge and for the worst what would YOU do? Lets put it this way what are the schools that are closing are not yet "academies" and still part of the Council's remit? whilst the teachers at academies are paid almost 1/3 more with far better working conditions! If a council-run school has to be good then t has to keep the teachers and even create more teaching posts thus increasing the wage bill to keep inline with teachers pay in thee private sector or are you not bothered that the standard of teaching will be lower because of the class sizes - the less in the class the better the standard!!! Anyway read the report - they are striking over working conditions which WILL affect your children, therefore you should be supporting the teachers. As for your comment, JustBecause, when can they strike to make an impact and show what is going wrong if they were not allowed to strike during teaching time? Remember the change in working conditions means that the education of your child WILL be affected for the worse and not better![/p][/quote]I Suspect the lack of schooling will affect the kids more than any changes. If the teachersdon't like the t and c they are free to move or seek alternative employment. I did. And as it stands I have had no pay rise for three years and have been told not to expect one for two more, whilst those on minimum wage working for the same group will shortley get an inflation busting rise. Life is like that sometimes. Teachers in particular, but most people who work in the public sector have noidea what life is like in the real wworld![/p][/quote]So state schools lose the best teachers to academies, public schools, and other careers thus leaving the "principled" teachers and teachers who are only okay, because state schools shouldn't be competitive!!! How is that going to improve children's education in this country? Lets put it this way Pay: Not had an increase in 5 years in line with the Private Sector Pension: Illegally withdrawn current package and put on a lower one. Legally they should have kept the original packages going for those not changing contract, but change to the lesser pension when sign a new contract or gain promotion or start a new job - like in the private sector!!! Conditions: More and more paperwork - so much so that it is no longer a teaching role nowadays but an administrative role! Not knowing what they should be teaching come September as the Government don't know what they are doing - GCCSE's or Baccalaureate's, plus no curriculum set up and no text books. Plus no direction/purpose/pl an for the rise of compulsory education which now end 17 from this school year and 18 from next school year!!! So you have fallen for the Tory trap of thinking that the Public Sector is in a world of its own? over 5 million public sector jobs lost over the last 5 years with at least another 2-3 million over next couple of years says different. Illegally having their pensions changed, says differently, no pay increases for last 6 years say differently! Plus lets not forget that whether Public or Private they have to abide to the employment laws!!![/p][/quote]It is a fact that the public workers are 15% better off than the private sector and have more time on sick than private sector owencoyle99
  • Score: -5

6:53pm Tue 18 Mar 14

BWFC71 says...

owencoyle99 wrote:
BWFC71 wrote:
atlas123 wrote:
BWFC71 wrote:
atlas123 wrote: Teachers, one of the few professions Maggie didnt get around to sorting out
If our working conditions were changed without prior knowledge and for the worst what would YOU do? Lets put it this way what are the schools that are closing are not yet "academies" and still part of the Council's remit? whilst the teachers at academies are paid almost 1/3 more with far better working conditions! If a council-run school has to be good then t has to keep the teachers and even create more teaching posts thus increasing the wage bill to keep inline with teachers pay in thee private sector or are you not bothered that the standard of teaching will be lower because of the class sizes - the less in the class the better the standard!!! Anyway read the report - they are striking over working conditions which WILL affect your children, therefore you should be supporting the teachers. As for your comment, JustBecause, when can they strike to make an impact and show what is going wrong if they were not allowed to strike during teaching time? Remember the change in working conditions means that the education of your child WILL be affected for the worse and not better!
I Suspect the lack of schooling will affect the kids more than any changes. If the teachersdon't like the t and c they are free to move or seek alternative employment. I did. And as it stands I have had no pay rise for three years and have been told not to expect one for two more, whilst those on minimum wage working for the same group will shortley get an inflation busting rise. Life is like that sometimes. Teachers in particular, but most people who work in the public sector have noidea what life is like in the real wworld!
So state schools lose the best teachers to academies, public schools, and other careers thus leaving the "principled" teachers and teachers who are only okay, because state schools shouldn't be competitive!!! How is that going to improve children's education in this country? Lets put it this way Pay: Not had an increase in 5 years in line with the Private Sector Pension: Illegally withdrawn current package and put on a lower one. Legally they should have kept the original packages going for those not changing contract, but change to the lesser pension when sign a new contract or gain promotion or start a new job - like in the private sector!!! Conditions: More and more paperwork - so much so that it is no longer a teaching role nowadays but an administrative role! Not knowing what they should be teaching come September as the Government don't know what they are doing - GCCSE's or Baccalaureate's, plus no curriculum set up and no text books. Plus no direction/purpose/pl an for the rise of compulsory education which now end 17 from this school year and 18 from next school year!!! So you have fallen for the Tory trap of thinking that the Public Sector is in a world of its own? over 5 million public sector jobs lost over the last 5 years with at least another 2-3 million over next couple of years says different. Illegally having their pensions changed, says differently, no pay increases for last 6 years say differently! Plus lets not forget that whether Public or Private they have to abide to the employment laws!!!
It is a fact that the public workers are 15% better off than the private sector and have more time on sick than private sector
s it - considering that more than 70% of the public sector workers are on the minimum wage.

Teachers in the private sector are 30% better off than in the public sector and medical staff in the private sector are actually up to 100% better off than in the public sector!!!!

Funnily enough Chief CEO's in the private sector earn over 100% more than chiefs in the public sector - all you need to do is look at the Bank CEO's and what wages they are on.

So to say it is a fact that people in the public sector are better off is actually not a fact but a PR stunt by Tories to create the divide and conquer culture - but when you look at the cold facts its actually false.
[quote][p][bold]owencoyle99[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]BWFC71[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]atlas123[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]BWFC71[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]atlas123[/bold] wrote: Teachers, one of the few professions Maggie didnt get around to sorting out[/p][/quote]If our working conditions were changed without prior knowledge and for the worst what would YOU do? Lets put it this way what are the schools that are closing are not yet "academies" and still part of the Council's remit? whilst the teachers at academies are paid almost 1/3 more with far better working conditions! If a council-run school has to be good then t has to keep the teachers and even create more teaching posts thus increasing the wage bill to keep inline with teachers pay in thee private sector or are you not bothered that the standard of teaching will be lower because of the class sizes - the less in the class the better the standard!!! Anyway read the report - they are striking over working conditions which WILL affect your children, therefore you should be supporting the teachers. As for your comment, JustBecause, when can they strike to make an impact and show what is going wrong if they were not allowed to strike during teaching time? Remember the change in working conditions means that the education of your child WILL be affected for the worse and not better![/p][/quote]I Suspect the lack of schooling will affect the kids more than any changes. If the teachersdon't like the t and c they are free to move or seek alternative employment. I did. And as it stands I have had no pay rise for three years and have been told not to expect one for two more, whilst those on minimum wage working for the same group will shortley get an inflation busting rise. Life is like that sometimes. Teachers in particular, but most people who work in the public sector have noidea what life is like in the real wworld![/p][/quote]So state schools lose the best teachers to academies, public schools, and other careers thus leaving the "principled" teachers and teachers who are only okay, because state schools shouldn't be competitive!!! How is that going to improve children's education in this country? Lets put it this way Pay: Not had an increase in 5 years in line with the Private Sector Pension: Illegally withdrawn current package and put on a lower one. Legally they should have kept the original packages going for those not changing contract, but change to the lesser pension when sign a new contract or gain promotion or start a new job - like in the private sector!!! Conditions: More and more paperwork - so much so that it is no longer a teaching role nowadays but an administrative role! Not knowing what they should be teaching come September as the Government don't know what they are doing - GCCSE's or Baccalaureate's, plus no curriculum set up and no text books. Plus no direction/purpose/pl an for the rise of compulsory education which now end 17 from this school year and 18 from next school year!!! So you have fallen for the Tory trap of thinking that the Public Sector is in a world of its own? over 5 million public sector jobs lost over the last 5 years with at least another 2-3 million over next couple of years says different. Illegally having their pensions changed, says differently, no pay increases for last 6 years say differently! Plus lets not forget that whether Public or Private they have to abide to the employment laws!!![/p][/quote]It is a fact that the public workers are 15% better off than the private sector and have more time on sick than private sector[/p][/quote]s it - considering that more than 70% of the public sector workers are on the minimum wage. Teachers in the private sector are 30% better off than in the public sector and medical staff in the private sector are actually up to 100% better off than in the public sector!!!! Funnily enough Chief CEO's in the private sector earn over 100% more than chiefs in the public sector - all you need to do is look at the Bank CEO's and what wages they are on. So to say it is a fact that people in the public sector are better off is actually not a fact but a PR stunt by Tories to create the divide and conquer culture - but when you look at the cold facts its actually false. BWFC71
  • Score: -8

6:58pm Tue 18 Mar 14

Gore Seer says...

BWFC71 wrote:
Gore Seer wrote:
BWFC71 wrote:
Gore Seer wrote: Pay And Pensions Are Fantastic And The Tax Free Lump Sum. My Ex Girlfriend Got A £38,000 Tax Free, She Retired At the Age Of 52, Now On Top Of Her School Pension,She Gets State Pen She Is Quids In.She Taught First Year Infants And Had Two Helpers, Me I Was A Monkey I Had To Work 60 Hour Weeks For Peanuts.
But if you had stayed at school and took on the profession, instead of knocking it then you would have also been paid the same. You only get out of life what you put into it! For you, education was a big plan but that meant you were sidelined for so many decently paid jobs and hence you haven't really got that far in life - possibly you are happy with that, who knows, but do not knock people because of their choice of profession and how they have progressed!
We Are In A Recession I Have Been Force More Than Once To Strike For a Fare Deal As I Lost Out To Cuts, Teachers Never Supported The Worker.
We are NOT in a recession anymore and haven't been for at least the last 24 months. A recession is when 2 or more financial quarters are in a minus and that hasn't happened for over 2 years!

Yes we have been in a depression and we are slowly coming out of it - and not helped by the fact that the Tories actually sent us back into recession (as before the election we were actually increasing production).

But teaching should be ringfenced along with the NHS as they are the two most basic necessities a human requires - NHS for health and Teacher for education to train the children of today to be a success in all that they do tomorrow!
Joe Public Pay There Salaries Pensions Bonuses, There Is No Golden Goose Laying Golden Eggs, I Have A Low IQ So I Could Be Wrong, I My Be One Of The Geese It Certainly Be Painful, I Pay Towards The Wage Package So I Will Have My Say, If I Offend With My Comments Change Of Job Perhaps.
[quote][p][bold]BWFC71[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Gore Seer[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]BWFC71[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Gore Seer[/bold] wrote: Pay And Pensions Are Fantastic And The Tax Free Lump Sum. My Ex Girlfriend Got A £38,000 Tax Free, She Retired At the Age Of 52, Now On Top Of Her School Pension,She Gets State Pen She Is Quids In.She Taught First Year Infants And Had Two Helpers, Me I Was A Monkey I Had To Work 60 Hour Weeks For Peanuts.[/p][/quote]But if you had stayed at school and took on the profession, instead of knocking it then you would have also been paid the same. You only get out of life what you put into it! For you, education was a big plan but that meant you were sidelined for so many decently paid jobs and hence you haven't really got that far in life - possibly you are happy with that, who knows, but do not knock people because of their choice of profession and how they have progressed![/p][/quote]We Are In A Recession I Have Been Force More Than Once To Strike For a Fare Deal As I Lost Out To Cuts, Teachers Never Supported The Worker.[/p][/quote]We are NOT in a recession anymore and haven't been for at least the last 24 months. A recession is when 2 or more financial quarters are in a minus and that hasn't happened for over 2 years! Yes we have been in a depression and we are slowly coming out of it - and not helped by the fact that the Tories actually sent us back into recession (as before the election we were actually increasing production). But teaching should be ringfenced along with the NHS as they are the two most basic necessities a human requires - NHS for health and Teacher for education to train the children of today to be a success in all that they do tomorrow![/p][/quote]Joe Public Pay There Salaries Pensions Bonuses, There Is No Golden Goose Laying Golden Eggs, I Have A Low IQ So I Could Be Wrong, I My Be One Of The Geese It Certainly Be Painful, I Pay Towards The Wage Package So I Will Have My Say, If I Offend With My Comments Change Of Job Perhaps. Gore Seer
  • Score: -4

7:17pm Tue 18 Mar 14

BWFC71 says...

Gore Seer wrote:
BWFC71 wrote:
Gore Seer wrote:
BWFC71 wrote:
Gore Seer wrote: Pay And Pensions Are Fantastic And The Tax Free Lump Sum. My Ex Girlfriend Got A £38,000 Tax Free, She Retired At the Age Of 52, Now On Top Of Her School Pension,She Gets State Pen She Is Quids In.She Taught First Year Infants And Had Two Helpers, Me I Was A Monkey I Had To Work 60 Hour Weeks For Peanuts.
But if you had stayed at school and took on the profession, instead of knocking it then you would have also been paid the same. You only get out of life what you put into it! For you, education was a big plan but that meant you were sidelined for so many decently paid jobs and hence you haven't really got that far in life - possibly you are happy with that, who knows, but do not knock people because of their choice of profession and how they have progressed!
We Are In A Recession I Have Been Force More Than Once To Strike For a Fare Deal As I Lost Out To Cuts, Teachers Never Supported The Worker.
We are NOT in a recession anymore and haven't been for at least the last 24 months. A recession is when 2 or more financial quarters are in a minus and that hasn't happened for over 2 years! Yes we have been in a depression and we are slowly coming out of it - and not helped by the fact that the Tories actually sent us back into recession (as before the election we were actually increasing production). But teaching should be ringfenced along with the NHS as they are the two most basic necessities a human requires - NHS for health and Teacher for education to train the children of today to be a success in all that they do tomorrow!
Joe Public Pay There Salaries Pensions Bonuses, There Is No Golden Goose Laying Golden Eggs, I Have A Low IQ So I Could Be Wrong, I My Be One Of The Geese It Certainly Be Painful, I Pay Towards The Wage Package So I Will Have My Say, If I Offend With My Comments Change Of Job Perhaps.
To have the best education you need to have the best teachers and lower class sizes than what we currently have - at moment there is between 30 and 40 children per lass and yet the ideal class size is 20 - therefore twice as many teachers are required than at present.

But to keep the best and make sure that children do leave school with a basic education then you need to pay competitive rates or teachers move on to the public schools or even overseas and where does that leave the education of children?

But if you want ALL schools to be privatised then I hope you can pay the price as the average annual price for an education is about £7,500/annum/child - excluding dinner, school uniforms and school books which cost money!!!!
[quote][p][bold]Gore Seer[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]BWFC71[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Gore Seer[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]BWFC71[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Gore Seer[/bold] wrote: Pay And Pensions Are Fantastic And The Tax Free Lump Sum. My Ex Girlfriend Got A £38,000 Tax Free, She Retired At the Age Of 52, Now On Top Of Her School Pension,She Gets State Pen She Is Quids In.She Taught First Year Infants And Had Two Helpers, Me I Was A Monkey I Had To Work 60 Hour Weeks For Peanuts.[/p][/quote]But if you had stayed at school and took on the profession, instead of knocking it then you would have also been paid the same. You only get out of life what you put into it! For you, education was a big plan but that meant you were sidelined for so many decently paid jobs and hence you haven't really got that far in life - possibly you are happy with that, who knows, but do not knock people because of their choice of profession and how they have progressed![/p][/quote]We Are In A Recession I Have Been Force More Than Once To Strike For a Fare Deal As I Lost Out To Cuts, Teachers Never Supported The Worker.[/p][/quote]We are NOT in a recession anymore and haven't been for at least the last 24 months. A recession is when 2 or more financial quarters are in a minus and that hasn't happened for over 2 years! Yes we have been in a depression and we are slowly coming out of it - and not helped by the fact that the Tories actually sent us back into recession (as before the election we were actually increasing production). But teaching should be ringfenced along with the NHS as they are the two most basic necessities a human requires - NHS for health and Teacher for education to train the children of today to be a success in all that they do tomorrow![/p][/quote]Joe Public Pay There Salaries Pensions Bonuses, There Is No Golden Goose Laying Golden Eggs, I Have A Low IQ So I Could Be Wrong, I My Be One Of The Geese It Certainly Be Painful, I Pay Towards The Wage Package So I Will Have My Say, If I Offend With My Comments Change Of Job Perhaps.[/p][/quote]To have the best education you need to have the best teachers and lower class sizes than what we currently have - at moment there is between 30 and 40 children per lass and yet the ideal class size is 20 - therefore twice as many teachers are required than at present. But to keep the best and make sure that children do leave school with a basic education then you need to pay competitive rates or teachers move on to the public schools or even overseas and where does that leave the education of children? But if you want ALL schools to be privatised then I hope you can pay the price as the average annual price for an education is about £7,500/annum/child - excluding dinner, school uniforms and school books which cost money!!!! BWFC71
  • Score: -9

7:22pm Tue 18 Mar 14

BWFC71 says...

owencoyle99 wrote:
BWFC71 wrote:
Iluminati wrote: Well well. The teachers are at it again. This time it's the paperwork. Next time is something else, any excuse to strike ! Too much paperwork equates to too much pressure, but no pressure at all in taking a fistful of over generous holidays and a more then generous pension scheme. On top of all this, a well organised strike is always welcome and eases the pressure. What a lot of spoiled people they're. Next time I come onto this world, I definitely want to become a teacher!!!!!!!!!
Tell me where the generous holiday are please. As I have stated above. during the summer holiday they only get 2 weeks, Half term is taken over with paperwork. And they don't even get full allocation of holiday at Christmas or Easter. Any extra they do get is offset by the hours they do, in total, (both teaching time and non-teaching time) equates to above 60 hours a week - so would you be willing to do 60 hours a week without overtime or days off in lieu? Find out what teachers actually do before making a sweeping statement like that, which is totally false!
You have to get a degree first to teach then save £30000 for university after this you have to pay back the £30000 you borrowed in the first place
Incorrect as a teaching course (BEd) is actually a 4 year course. Therefore one lends £36,000 and then pays it back, via income tax from the salary!

Or one can do a PGCE course (a 1 year course for those who already have degree's or degree equivalents) - thus only £9,000 is required for Student Loans and then paid back via income tax from the salary!!!

The of course there are the hidden costs such as books, paper, pens and then travelling to and from various school placements, for on the job training, which make up 70% of the courses!!!
[quote][p][bold]owencoyle99[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]BWFC71[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Iluminati[/bold] wrote: Well well. The teachers are at it again. This time it's the paperwork. Next time is something else, any excuse to strike ! Too much paperwork equates to too much pressure, but no pressure at all in taking a fistful of over generous holidays and a more then generous pension scheme. On top of all this, a well organised strike is always welcome and eases the pressure. What a lot of spoiled people they're. Next time I come onto this world, I definitely want to become a teacher!!!!!!!!![/p][/quote]Tell me where the generous holiday are please. As I have stated above. during the summer holiday they only get 2 weeks, Half term is taken over with paperwork. And they don't even get full allocation of holiday at Christmas or Easter. Any extra they do get is offset by the hours they do, in total, (both teaching time and non-teaching time) equates to above 60 hours a week - so would you be willing to do 60 hours a week without overtime or days off in lieu? Find out what teachers actually do before making a sweeping statement like that, which is totally false![/p][/quote]You have to get a degree first to teach then save £30000 for university after this you have to pay back the £30000 you borrowed in the first place[/p][/quote]Incorrect as a teaching course (BEd) is actually a 4 year course. Therefore one lends £36,000 and then pays it back, via income tax from the salary! Or one can do a PGCE course (a 1 year course for those who already have degree's or degree equivalents) - thus only £9,000 is required for Student Loans and then paid back via income tax from the salary!!! The of course there are the hidden costs such as books, paper, pens and then travelling to and from various school placements, for on the job training, which make up 70% of the courses!!! BWFC71
  • Score: -9

8:31pm Tue 18 Mar 14

BWFC71 says...

oops I used lends instead of borrows - just spotted the error!
oops I used lends instead of borrows - just spotted the error! BWFC71
  • Score: -4

7:32am Wed 19 Mar 14

JustBecause says...

MarkAllRead wrote:
JustBecause wrote:
Double standards, take your child out of school for holiday and your fined, yet striking so,children cannot attend is fine, ridiculous.
Did your teachers strike on the day they were supposed to teach the difference between "your" and "you're"?
The grammar police are here again..... I cannot believe how far I got in life with such a huge disadvantage.

Anyway back to topic, the strike will achieve nothing, except,disruption to parents and children.
[quote][p][bold]MarkAllRead[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]JustBecause[/bold] wrote: Double standards, take your child out of school for holiday and your fined, yet striking so,children cannot attend is fine, ridiculous.[/p][/quote]Did your teachers strike on the day they were supposed to teach the difference between "your" and "you're"?[/p][/quote]The grammar police are here again..... I cannot believe how far I got in life with such a huge disadvantage. Anyway back to topic, the strike will achieve nothing, except,disruption to parents and children. JustBecause
  • Score: -1

7:50am Wed 19 Mar 14

boltonchap says...

BWFC71 wrote:
oops I used lends instead of borrows - just spotted the error!
More likely your Mummy spotted it sunshine.
[quote][p][bold]BWFC71[/bold] wrote: oops I used lends instead of borrows - just spotted the error![/p][/quote]More likely your Mummy spotted it sunshine. boltonchap
  • Score: 0

8:36am Wed 19 Mar 14

Gore Seer says...

BWFC71 wrote:
Gore Seer wrote:
Pay And Pensions Are Fantastic And The Tax Free Lump Sum. My Ex Girlfriend Got A £38,000 Tax Free, She Retired At the Age Of 52, Now On Top Of Her School Pension,She Gets State Pen She Is Quids In.She Taught First Year Infants And Had Two Helpers, Me I Was A Monkey I Had To Work 60 Hour Weeks For Peanuts.
But if you had stayed at school and took on the profession, instead of knocking it then you would have also been paid the same.

You only get out of life what you put into it! For you, education was a big plan but that meant you were sidelined for so many decently paid jobs and hence you haven't really got that far in life - possibly you are happy with that, who knows, but do not knock people because of their choice of profession and how they have progressed!
When I Went To School Our Teachers Were Tool Up With Fence Post, That Was Our Sports Teachers Preferred Weapon, Are Headmaster Had A Good Collection Of Canes 6 In All, Are Mathes Teacher Use A Board Rubber,He Could Hit Your Head At 10 Yards, And Did Often, Deputy Head Liked Striking You With Rulers As Did Other Teachers, Are Sports Teacher Said We All Had To Have Sports Kit Any Child With No Kit Got The Plank My Dad Was A Alci And Would Not Get Me A Sports Kit,Well Guess What I Got Yes A Red Bottom Often, Yet My Dad Worked And Paid Tax For The Teachers, Dyslexia Kids Like Me Got Beaten Thanks Teachers.
[quote][p][bold]BWFC71[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Gore Seer[/bold] wrote: Pay And Pensions Are Fantastic And The Tax Free Lump Sum. My Ex Girlfriend Got A £38,000 Tax Free, She Retired At the Age Of 52, Now On Top Of Her School Pension,She Gets State Pen She Is Quids In.She Taught First Year Infants And Had Two Helpers, Me I Was A Monkey I Had To Work 60 Hour Weeks For Peanuts.[/p][/quote]But if you had stayed at school and took on the profession, instead of knocking it then you would have also been paid the same. You only get out of life what you put into it! For you, education was a big plan but that meant you were sidelined for so many decently paid jobs and hence you haven't really got that far in life - possibly you are happy with that, who knows, but do not knock people because of their choice of profession and how they have progressed![/p][/quote]When I Went To School Our Teachers Were Tool Up With Fence Post, That Was Our Sports Teachers Preferred Weapon, Are Headmaster Had A Good Collection Of Canes 6 In All, Are Mathes Teacher Use A Board Rubber,He Could Hit Your Head At 10 Yards, And Did Often, Deputy Head Liked Striking You With Rulers As Did Other Teachers, Are Sports Teacher Said We All Had To Have Sports Kit Any Child With No Kit Got The Plank My Dad Was A Alci And Would Not Get Me A Sports Kit,Well Guess What I Got Yes A Red Bottom Often, Yet My Dad Worked And Paid Tax For The Teachers, Dyslexia Kids Like Me Got Beaten Thanks Teachers. Gore Seer
  • Score: -2

9:23am Wed 19 Mar 14

Gore Seer says...

Are Geography Teacher Cant Remember His Name,His Prefered Weapon Was a Machete He Had Work Round Africa And Had Spears And African Knives On The Wall Of His Classroom, One Morning In Assembly Head Teacher Warned School That Furniture Was Getting damage It Had To Stop, Latter That Day We Had Geography ,He Was Waving The Machete In The Air My Mate Pet Ask How Dangerous Is That Knife, This Is No Knife And Immediately Chopped The Edge Of His Desk Of, See What It Can Do In A Stroke, Had A Swig Of Whisky Itl Take A Mans Head Of With One Strike I Did Good At Geography That Year We All Did In Class I Just Love Teachers.
Are Geography Teacher Cant Remember His Name,His Prefered Weapon Was a Machete He Had Work Round Africa And Had Spears And African Knives On The Wall Of His Classroom, One Morning In Assembly Head Teacher Warned School That Furniture Was Getting damage It Had To Stop, Latter That Day We Had Geography ,He Was Waving The Machete In The Air My Mate Pet Ask How Dangerous Is That Knife, This Is No Knife And Immediately Chopped The Edge Of His Desk Of, See What It Can Do In A Stroke, Had A Swig Of Whisky Itl Take A Mans Head Of With One Strike I Did Good At Geography That Year We All Did In Class I Just Love Teachers. Gore Seer
  • Score: -2

9:42am Wed 19 Mar 14

Darrennz says...

I support the teachers actions. Stressful job does not need making any more stressful by govt interference and manipulation. Go teach! fight for your conditions..
I support the teachers actions. Stressful job does not need making any more stressful by govt interference and manipulation. Go teach! fight for your conditions.. Darrennz
  • Score: 3

10:04am Wed 19 Mar 14

BWFC71 says...

JustBecause wrote:
MarkAllRead wrote:
JustBecause wrote: Double standards, take your child out of school for holiday and your fined, yet striking so,children cannot attend is fine, ridiculous.
Did your teachers strike on the day they were supposed to teach the difference between "your" and "you're"?
The grammar police are here again..... I cannot believe how far I got in life with such a huge disadvantage. Anyway back to topic, the strike will achieve nothing, except,disruption to parents and children.
And that it is meant to do and bring home the message that something is wrong from high above!!!

How else are they going to raise the profile of the disaster that is about to happen to EVERY child if this additional paperwork is introduced!

Do you want you chid to be taught by a professionally taught teacher who has the correct qualifications, or do you want your child to be taught by someone without teaching qualifications and being paid on the cheap - a Teaching Assistant!

Which gives the best chance for the better opportunity for your child?
[quote][p][bold]JustBecause[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]MarkAllRead[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]JustBecause[/bold] wrote: Double standards, take your child out of school for holiday and your fined, yet striking so,children cannot attend is fine, ridiculous.[/p][/quote]Did your teachers strike on the day they were supposed to teach the difference between "your" and "you're"?[/p][/quote]The grammar police are here again..... I cannot believe how far I got in life with such a huge disadvantage. Anyway back to topic, the strike will achieve nothing, except,disruption to parents and children.[/p][/quote]And that it is meant to do and bring home the message that something is wrong from high above!!! How else are they going to raise the profile of the disaster that is about to happen to EVERY child if this additional paperwork is introduced! Do you want you chid to be taught by a professionally taught teacher who has the correct qualifications, or do you want your child to be taught by someone without teaching qualifications and being paid on the cheap - a Teaching Assistant! Which gives the best chance for the better opportunity for your child? BWFC71
  • Score: -8

10:27am Wed 19 Mar 14

boltonchap says...

BWFC71 I could do with your help please. As you may remember on another thread my black Labrador inadvertently gave one of your posts a thumbs down and as a result of your complaint he is now in police custody.
He needs a good lawyer. In fact given the seriousness of the alleged offence he needs the best legal advice money can buy and I love the dog dearly so will pay whatever is needed to get him off.
Given that you:
Are a man of the world
Have a superb command of English grammar and spelling
Speak more languages than you can shake a stick at
Have more degrees than Stephen Hawking
Are level headed
Have a high flying business career most can only dream of
Know everything there is to know about absolutely everything
Are clearly very well balanced and are such a nice fellow to boot
Know all the movers and shakers on the planet
I was wondering if you could recommend a good lawyer for him?
Thanks in advance and kind regards.
BWFC71 I could do with your help please. As you may remember on another thread my black Labrador inadvertently gave one of your posts a thumbs down and as a result of your complaint he is now in police custody. He needs a good lawyer. In fact given the seriousness of the alleged offence he needs the best legal advice money can buy and I love the dog dearly so will pay whatever is needed to get him off. Given that you: Are a man of the world Have a superb command of English grammar and spelling Speak more languages than you can shake a stick at Have more degrees than Stephen Hawking Are level headed Have a high flying business career most can only dream of Know everything there is to know about absolutely everything Are clearly very well balanced and are such a nice fellow to boot Know all the movers and shakers on the planet I was wondering if you could recommend a good lawyer for him? Thanks in advance and kind regards. boltonchap
  • Score: 4

10:59am Wed 19 Mar 14

berushka says...

SACK THE MORONIC, SOCIALIST JOBSWORTHS AND EMPLOY SOME REAL TEACHERS.
SACK THE MORONIC, SOCIALIST JOBSWORTHS AND EMPLOY SOME REAL TEACHERS. berushka
  • Score: -4

11:24am Wed 19 Mar 14

BWFC71 says...

berushka wrote:
SACK THE MORONIC, SOCIALIST JOBSWORTHS AND EMPLOY SOME REAL TEACHERS.
"Real" teachers, which make up 100% of the teaching profession, will want the real decent wage - equivalent to what they get paid in public schools which is, on average, 50% more than in the state schools!!

Also as Teachers are trained over a 4 year period (for BEd) then they want the wage that equates to the what they have gained from university studies!!! A typical Graduate programme in the private sector has a starting salary of £25,000 + benefits - more than the starting salary of teacher - so you want the equivalent for teachers?

Or would you prefer teaching to be privatised where the average price to send children to school would be £7,500 per annum per child (excluding meals uniforms, books, pens, travel)
[quote][p][bold]berushka[/bold] wrote: SACK THE MORONIC, SOCIALIST JOBSWORTHS AND EMPLOY SOME REAL TEACHERS.[/p][/quote]"Real" teachers, which make up 100% of the teaching profession, will want the real decent wage - equivalent to what they get paid in public schools which is, on average, 50% more than in the state schools!! Also as Teachers are trained over a 4 year period (for BEd) then they want the wage that equates to the what they have gained from university studies!!! A typical Graduate programme in the private sector has a starting salary of £25,000 + benefits - more than the starting salary of teacher - so you want the equivalent for teachers? Or would you prefer teaching to be privatised where the average price to send children to school would be £7,500 per annum per child (excluding meals uniforms, books, pens, travel) BWFC71
  • Score: -12

3:36pm Wed 19 Mar 14

RogerMooresEyebrow says...

I can't quite get my head around the rank stupidity of people who say "my wages are crap and I've no pension, so why should teachers be better off?". I decided not to go to university and therefore limited my chances of a well paid career with great terms and conditions. My choice and no-one else is to blame.
Personally, if I was being told to accept a pay freeze for the fourth year running, work longer, pay more into my pension and get less when I retire by people who've never taught a lesson in their lives, as well as being told that I will be paid by results despite being poorly resourced, whilst other public sector workers (MPs) in Parliament are awarding themselves with an 11% increase for total incompetence, I'd be withdrawing my labour too.
I'm a parent, and I just want my children to be taught by well trained, dedicated teachers, who just want to get on with the job, rather than keep on being distracted by idiots in the Department of Education with an axe to grind against Unions and others who have a fetish for form-filling, box-ticking and bureaucracy. I also don't like the idea of a stressed out, angry and demoralised 67 year old teaching my kids.
As for all the Union-haters on here; feel free to pay for private healthcare and education and don't ask the state for any financial help if you end up out of work. Also, be sure to hand back all those working rights, weekends, holidays, maternity/paternity leave and health and safety back to your employers whilst negotiating your own pay rises and let us know how it works out for you. Either walk the walk or shut up. I back the teachers.
I can't quite get my head around the rank stupidity of people who say "my wages are crap and I've no pension, so why should teachers be better off?". I decided not to go to university and therefore limited my chances of a well paid career with great terms and conditions. My choice and no-one else is to blame. Personally, if I was being told to accept a pay freeze for the fourth year running, work longer, pay more into my pension and get less when I retire by people who've never taught a lesson in their lives, as well as being told that I will be paid by results despite being poorly resourced, whilst other public sector workers (MPs) in Parliament are awarding themselves with an 11% increase for total incompetence, I'd be withdrawing my labour too. I'm a parent, and I just want my children to be taught by well trained, dedicated teachers, who just want to get on with the job, rather than keep on being distracted by idiots in the Department of Education with an axe to grind against Unions and others who have a fetish for form-filling, box-ticking and bureaucracy. I also don't like the idea of a stressed out, angry and demoralised 67 year old teaching my kids. As for all the Union-haters on here; feel free to pay for private healthcare and education and don't ask the state for any financial help if you end up out of work. Also, be sure to hand back all those working rights, weekends, holidays, maternity/paternity leave and health and safety back to your employers whilst negotiating your own pay rises and let us know how it works out for you. Either walk the walk or shut up. I back the teachers. RogerMooresEyebrow
  • Score: 9

4:20pm Wed 19 Mar 14

BWFC71 says...

RogerMooresEyebrow wrote:
I can't quite get my head around the rank stupidity of people who say "my wages are crap and I've no pension, so why should teachers be better off?". I decided not to go to university and therefore limited my chances of a well paid career with great terms and conditions. My choice and no-one else is to blame. Personally, if I was being told to accept a pay freeze for the fourth year running, work longer, pay more into my pension and get less when I retire by people who've never taught a lesson in their lives, as well as being told that I will be paid by results despite being poorly resourced, whilst other public sector workers (MPs) in Parliament are awarding themselves with an 11% increase for total incompetence, I'd be withdrawing my labour too. I'm a parent, and I just want my children to be taught by well trained, dedicated teachers, who just want to get on with the job, rather than keep on being distracted by idiots in the Department of Education with an axe to grind against Unions and others who have a fetish for form-filling, box-ticking and bureaucracy. I also don't like the idea of a stressed out, angry and demoralised 67 year old teaching my kids. As for all the Union-haters on here; feel free to pay for private healthcare and education and don't ask the state for any financial help if you end up out of work. Also, be sure to hand back all those working rights, weekends, holidays, maternity/paternity leave and health and safety back to your employers whilst negotiating your own pay rises and let us know how it works out for you. Either walk the walk or shut up. I back the teachers.
Well said :-)
[quote][p][bold]RogerMooresEyebrow[/bold] wrote: I can't quite get my head around the rank stupidity of people who say "my wages are crap and I've no pension, so why should teachers be better off?". I decided not to go to university and therefore limited my chances of a well paid career with great terms and conditions. My choice and no-one else is to blame. Personally, if I was being told to accept a pay freeze for the fourth year running, work longer, pay more into my pension and get less when I retire by people who've never taught a lesson in their lives, as well as being told that I will be paid by results despite being poorly resourced, whilst other public sector workers (MPs) in Parliament are awarding themselves with an 11% increase for total incompetence, I'd be withdrawing my labour too. I'm a parent, and I just want my children to be taught by well trained, dedicated teachers, who just want to get on with the job, rather than keep on being distracted by idiots in the Department of Education with an axe to grind against Unions and others who have a fetish for form-filling, box-ticking and bureaucracy. I also don't like the idea of a stressed out, angry and demoralised 67 year old teaching my kids. As for all the Union-haters on here; feel free to pay for private healthcare and education and don't ask the state for any financial help if you end up out of work. Also, be sure to hand back all those working rights, weekends, holidays, maternity/paternity leave and health and safety back to your employers whilst negotiating your own pay rises and let us know how it works out for you. Either walk the walk or shut up. I back the teachers.[/p][/quote]Well said :-) BWFC71
  • Score: -10

5:55pm Wed 19 Mar 14

JustBecause says...

RogerMooresEyebrow wrote:
I can't quite get my head around the rank stupidity of people who say "my wages are crap and I've no pension, so why should teachers be better off?". I decided not to go to university and therefore limited my chances of a well paid career with great terms and conditions. My choice and no-one else is to blame.
Personally, if I was being told to accept a pay freeze for the fourth year running, work longer, pay more into my pension and get less when I retire by people who've never taught a lesson in their lives, as well as being told that I will be paid by results despite being poorly resourced, whilst other public sector workers (MPs) in Parliament are awarding themselves with an 11% increase for total incompetence, I'd be withdrawing my labour too.
I'm a parent, and I just want my children to be taught by well trained, dedicated teachers, who just want to get on with the job, rather than keep on being distracted by idiots in the Department of Education with an axe to grind against Unions and others who have a fetish for form-filling, box-ticking and bureaucracy. I also don't like the idea of a stressed out, angry and demoralised 67 year old teaching my kids.
As for all the Union-haters on here; feel free to pay for private healthcare and education and don't ask the state for any financial help if you end up out of work. Also, be sure to hand back all those working rights, weekends, holidays, maternity/paternity leave and health and safety back to your employers whilst negotiating your own pay rises and let us know how it works out for you. Either walk the walk or shut up. I back the teachers.
I can't quite get my head around the rank stupidity of people who say "my wages are crap and I've no pension, so why should teachers be better off?".

Isn't this why they are striking ?

I decided not to go to university and therefore limited my chances of a well paid career with great terms and conditions.

Why, I didn't got to uni, and have a thriving business and am well paid ?

My choice and no-one else is to blame. Personally, if I was being told to accept a pay freeze for the fourth year running, work longer, pay more into my pension and get less when I retire by people who've never taught a lesson in their lives, as well as being told that I will be paid by results despite being poorly resourced, whilst other public sector workers (MPs) in Parliament are awarding themselves with an 11% increase for total incompetence, I'd be withdrawing my labour too.

Ok your free to find another job.


I'm a parent, and I just want my children to be taught by well trained, dedicated teachers, who just want to get on with the job, rather than keep on being distracted by idiots in the Department of Education with an axe to grind against Unions and others who have a fetish for form-filling, box-ticking and bureaucracy. I also don't like the idea of a stressed out, angry and demoralised 67 year old teaching my kids.

A lot of what children learns is done at home, its not the sole responsibility of schools to educate our kids.


As for all the Union-haters on here; feel free to pay for private healthcare and education and don't ask the state for any financial help if you end up out of work.

I do, and am entitled to nothing from the state because, wait for it, I actually saved a few quid instead of spending it on beer and fags. Put thing in place to secure the future should the crap hit the fan.

Also, be sure to hand back all those working rights, weekends, holidays, maternity/paternity leave and health and safety back to your employers whilst negotiating your own pay rises and let us know how it works out for you. Either walk the walk or shut up. I back the teachers.

Remember they are free to get any job they want, including the private sector schools, if your not happy with your job, pay, pension, etc FIND ANOTHER JOB !
[quote][p][bold]RogerMooresEyebrow[/bold] wrote: I can't quite get my head around the rank stupidity of people who say "my wages are crap and I've no pension, so why should teachers be better off?". I decided not to go to university and therefore limited my chances of a well paid career with great terms and conditions. My choice and no-one else is to blame. Personally, if I was being told to accept a pay freeze for the fourth year running, work longer, pay more into my pension and get less when I retire by people who've never taught a lesson in their lives, as well as being told that I will be paid by results despite being poorly resourced, whilst other public sector workers (MPs) in Parliament are awarding themselves with an 11% increase for total incompetence, I'd be withdrawing my labour too. I'm a parent, and I just want my children to be taught by well trained, dedicated teachers, who just want to get on with the job, rather than keep on being distracted by idiots in the Department of Education with an axe to grind against Unions and others who have a fetish for form-filling, box-ticking and bureaucracy. I also don't like the idea of a stressed out, angry and demoralised 67 year old teaching my kids. As for all the Union-haters on here; feel free to pay for private healthcare and education and don't ask the state for any financial help if you end up out of work. Also, be sure to hand back all those working rights, weekends, holidays, maternity/paternity leave and health and safety back to your employers whilst negotiating your own pay rises and let us know how it works out for you. Either walk the walk or shut up. I back the teachers.[/p][/quote]I can't quite get my head around the rank stupidity of people who say "my wages are crap and I've no pension, so why should teachers be better off?". Isn't this why they are striking ? I decided not to go to university and therefore limited my chances of a well paid career with great terms and conditions. Why, I didn't got to uni, and have a thriving business and am well paid ? My choice and no-one else is to blame. Personally, if I was being told to accept a pay freeze for the fourth year running, work longer, pay more into my pension and get less when I retire by people who've never taught a lesson in their lives, as well as being told that I will be paid by results despite being poorly resourced, whilst other public sector workers (MPs) in Parliament are awarding themselves with an 11% increase for total incompetence, I'd be withdrawing my labour too. Ok your free to find another job. I'm a parent, and I just want my children to be taught by well trained, dedicated teachers, who just want to get on with the job, rather than keep on being distracted by idiots in the Department of Education with an axe to grind against Unions and others who have a fetish for form-filling, box-ticking and bureaucracy. I also don't like the idea of a stressed out, angry and demoralised 67 year old teaching my kids. A lot of what children learns is done at home, its not the sole responsibility of schools to educate our kids. As for all the Union-haters on here; feel free to pay for private healthcare and education and don't ask the state for any financial help if you end up out of work. I do, and am entitled to nothing from the state because, wait for it, I actually saved a few quid instead of spending it on beer and fags. Put thing in place to secure the future should the crap hit the fan. Also, be sure to hand back all those working rights, weekends, holidays, maternity/paternity leave and health and safety back to your employers whilst negotiating your own pay rises and let us know how it works out for you. Either walk the walk or shut up. I back the teachers. Remember they are free to get any job they want, including the private sector schools, if your not happy with your job, pay, pension, etc FIND ANOTHER JOB ! JustBecause
  • Score: -4

5:56pm Wed 19 Mar 14

JustBecause says...

RogerMooresEyebrow wrote:
I can't quite get my head around the rank stupidity of people who say "my wages are crap and I've no pension, so why should teachers be better off?". I decided not to go to university and therefore limited my chances of a well paid career with great terms and conditions. My choice and no-one else is to blame.
Personally, if I was being told to accept a pay freeze for the fourth year running, work longer, pay more into my pension and get less when I retire by people who've never taught a lesson in their lives, as well as being told that I will be paid by results despite being poorly resourced, whilst other public sector workers (MPs) in Parliament are awarding themselves with an 11% increase for total incompetence, I'd be withdrawing my labour too.
I'm a parent, and I just want my children to be taught by well trained, dedicated teachers, who just want to get on with the job, rather than keep on being distracted by idiots in the Department of Education with an axe to grind against Unions and others who have a fetish for form-filling, box-ticking and bureaucracy. I also don't like the idea of a stressed out, angry and demoralised 67 year old teaching my kids.
As for all the Union-haters on here; feel free to pay for private healthcare and education and don't ask the state for any financial help if you end up out of work. Also, be sure to hand back all those working rights, weekends, holidays, maternity/paternity leave and health and safety back to your employers whilst negotiating your own pay rises and let us know how it works out for you. Either walk the walk or shut up. I back the teachers.
I can't quite get my head around the rank stupidity of people who say "my wages are crap and I've no pension, so why should teachers be better off?".

Isn't this why they are striking ? because they say there wage are crap and the pensions rubbish ??

I decided not to go to university and therefore limited my chances of a well paid career with great terms and conditions.

Why, I didn't got to uni, and have a thriving business and am well paid ?

My choice and no-one else is to blame. Personally, if I was being told to accept a pay freeze for the fourth year running, work longer, pay more into my pension and get less when I retire by people who've never taught a lesson in their lives, as well as being told that I will be paid by results despite being poorly resourced, whilst other public sector workers (MPs) in Parliament are awarding themselves with an 11% increase for total incompetence, I'd be withdrawing my labour too.

Ok your free to find another job.


I'm a parent, and I just want my children to be taught by well trained, dedicated teachers, who just want to get on with the job, rather than keep on being distracted by idiots in the Department of Education with an axe to grind against Unions and others who have a fetish for form-filling, box-ticking and bureaucracy. I also don't like the idea of a stressed out, angry and demoralised 67 year old teaching my kids.

A lot of what children learns is done at home, its not the sole responsibility of schools to educate our kids.


As for all the Union-haters on here; feel free to pay for private healthcare and education and don't ask the state for any financial help if you end up out of work.

I do, and am entitled to nothing from the state because, wait for it, I actually saved a few quid instead of spending it on beer and fags. Put thing in place to secure the future should the crap hit the fan.

Also, be sure to hand back all those working rights, weekends, holidays, maternity/paternity leave and health and safety back to your employers whilst negotiating your own pay rises and let us know how it works out for you. Either walk the walk or shut up. I back the teachers.

Remember they are free to get any job they want, including the private sector schools, if your not happy with your job, pay, pension, etc FIND ANOTHER JOB !
[quote][p][bold]RogerMooresEyebrow[/bold] wrote: I can't quite get my head around the rank stupidity of people who say "my wages are crap and I've no pension, so why should teachers be better off?". I decided not to go to university and therefore limited my chances of a well paid career with great terms and conditions. My choice and no-one else is to blame. Personally, if I was being told to accept a pay freeze for the fourth year running, work longer, pay more into my pension and get less when I retire by people who've never taught a lesson in their lives, as well as being told that I will be paid by results despite being poorly resourced, whilst other public sector workers (MPs) in Parliament are awarding themselves with an 11% increase for total incompetence, I'd be withdrawing my labour too. I'm a parent, and I just want my children to be taught by well trained, dedicated teachers, who just want to get on with the job, rather than keep on being distracted by idiots in the Department of Education with an axe to grind against Unions and others who have a fetish for form-filling, box-ticking and bureaucracy. I also don't like the idea of a stressed out, angry and demoralised 67 year old teaching my kids. As for all the Union-haters on here; feel free to pay for private healthcare and education and don't ask the state for any financial help if you end up out of work. Also, be sure to hand back all those working rights, weekends, holidays, maternity/paternity leave and health and safety back to your employers whilst negotiating your own pay rises and let us know how it works out for you. Either walk the walk or shut up. I back the teachers.[/p][/quote]I can't quite get my head around the rank stupidity of people who say "my wages are crap and I've no pension, so why should teachers be better off?". Isn't this why they are striking ? because they say there wage are crap and the pensions rubbish ?? I decided not to go to university and therefore limited my chances of a well paid career with great terms and conditions. Why, I didn't got to uni, and have a thriving business and am well paid ? My choice and no-one else is to blame. Personally, if I was being told to accept a pay freeze for the fourth year running, work longer, pay more into my pension and get less when I retire by people who've never taught a lesson in their lives, as well as being told that I will be paid by results despite being poorly resourced, whilst other public sector workers (MPs) in Parliament are awarding themselves with an 11% increase for total incompetence, I'd be withdrawing my labour too. Ok your free to find another job. I'm a parent, and I just want my children to be taught by well trained, dedicated teachers, who just want to get on with the job, rather than keep on being distracted by idiots in the Department of Education with an axe to grind against Unions and others who have a fetish for form-filling, box-ticking and bureaucracy. I also don't like the idea of a stressed out, angry and demoralised 67 year old teaching my kids. A lot of what children learns is done at home, its not the sole responsibility of schools to educate our kids. As for all the Union-haters on here; feel free to pay for private healthcare and education and don't ask the state for any financial help if you end up out of work. I do, and am entitled to nothing from the state because, wait for it, I actually saved a few quid instead of spending it on beer and fags. Put thing in place to secure the future should the crap hit the fan. Also, be sure to hand back all those working rights, weekends, holidays, maternity/paternity leave and health and safety back to your employers whilst negotiating your own pay rises and let us know how it works out for you. Either walk the walk or shut up. I back the teachers. Remember they are free to get any job they want, including the private sector schools, if your not happy with your job, pay, pension, etc FIND ANOTHER JOB ! JustBecause
  • Score: -1

6:05pm Wed 19 Mar 14

BWFC71 says...

JustBecause wrote:
RogerMooresEyebrow wrote: I can't quite get my head around the rank stupidity of people who say "my wages are crap and I've no pension, so why should teachers be better off?". I decided not to go to university and therefore limited my chances of a well paid career with great terms and conditions. My choice and no-one else is to blame. Personally, if I was being told to accept a pay freeze for the fourth year running, work longer, pay more into my pension and get less when I retire by people who've never taught a lesson in their lives, as well as being told that I will be paid by results despite being poorly resourced, whilst other public sector workers (MPs) in Parliament are awarding themselves with an 11% increase for total incompetence, I'd be withdrawing my labour too. I'm a parent, and I just want my children to be taught by well trained, dedicated teachers, who just want to get on with the job, rather than keep on being distracted by idiots in the Department of Education with an axe to grind against Unions and others who have a fetish for form-filling, box-ticking and bureaucracy. I also don't like the idea of a stressed out, angry and demoralised 67 year old teaching my kids. As for all the Union-haters on here; feel free to pay for private healthcare and education and don't ask the state for any financial help if you end up out of work. Also, be sure to hand back all those working rights, weekends, holidays, maternity/paternity leave and health and safety back to your employers whilst negotiating your own pay rises and let us know how it works out for you. Either walk the walk or shut up. I back the teachers.
I can't quite get my head around the rank stupidity of people who say "my wages are crap and I've no pension, so why should teachers be better off?". Isn't this why they are striking ? because they say there wage are crap and the pensions rubbish ?? I decided not to go to university and therefore limited my chances of a well paid career with great terms and conditions. Why, I didn't got to uni, and have a thriving business and am well paid ? My choice and no-one else is to blame. Personally, if I was being told to accept a pay freeze for the fourth year running, work longer, pay more into my pension and get less when I retire by people who've never taught a lesson in their lives, as well as being told that I will be paid by results despite being poorly resourced, whilst other public sector workers (MPs) in Parliament are awarding themselves with an 11% increase for total incompetence, I'd be withdrawing my labour too. Ok your free to find another job. I'm a parent, and I just want my children to be taught by well trained, dedicated teachers, who just want to get on with the job, rather than keep on being distracted by idiots in the Department of Education with an axe to grind against Unions and others who have a fetish for form-filling, box-ticking and bureaucracy. I also don't like the idea of a stressed out, angry and demoralised 67 year old teaching my kids. A lot of what children learns is done at home, its not the sole responsibility of schools to educate our kids. As for all the Union-haters on here; feel free to pay for private healthcare and education and don't ask the state for any financial help if you end up out of work. I do, and am entitled to nothing from the state because, wait for it, I actually saved a few quid instead of spending it on beer and fags. Put thing in place to secure the future should the crap hit the fan. Also, be sure to hand back all those working rights, weekends, holidays, maternity/paternity leave and health and safety back to your employers whilst negotiating your own pay rises and let us know how it works out for you. Either walk the walk or shut up. I back the teachers. Remember they are free to get any job they want, including the private sector schools, if your not happy with your job, pay, pension, etc FIND ANOTHER JOB !
But when most jobs are in the Public Sector then they rates have to be competitive to those in the Private Sector if you want to have the best, and keep the best to teach children - but when pay is frozen for 5 years and the Pensions are being illegally lowered, compared to what is happening in the Private sector, and the paperwork is on the increase (in both the Public and Private sector due to Ofsted) then there are valid reasons to take industrial action - it is what happens in the Private sector, so why should the Public sector be any different?
[quote][p][bold]JustBecause[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]RogerMooresEyebrow[/bold] wrote: I can't quite get my head around the rank stupidity of people who say "my wages are crap and I've no pension, so why should teachers be better off?". I decided not to go to university and therefore limited my chances of a well paid career with great terms and conditions. My choice and no-one else is to blame. Personally, if I was being told to accept a pay freeze for the fourth year running, work longer, pay more into my pension and get less when I retire by people who've never taught a lesson in their lives, as well as being told that I will be paid by results despite being poorly resourced, whilst other public sector workers (MPs) in Parliament are awarding themselves with an 11% increase for total incompetence, I'd be withdrawing my labour too. I'm a parent, and I just want my children to be taught by well trained, dedicated teachers, who just want to get on with the job, rather than keep on being distracted by idiots in the Department of Education with an axe to grind against Unions and others who have a fetish for form-filling, box-ticking and bureaucracy. I also don't like the idea of a stressed out, angry and demoralised 67 year old teaching my kids. As for all the Union-haters on here; feel free to pay for private healthcare and education and don't ask the state for any financial help if you end up out of work. Also, be sure to hand back all those working rights, weekends, holidays, maternity/paternity leave and health and safety back to your employers whilst negotiating your own pay rises and let us know how it works out for you. Either walk the walk or shut up. I back the teachers.[/p][/quote]I can't quite get my head around the rank stupidity of people who say "my wages are crap and I've no pension, so why should teachers be better off?". Isn't this why they are striking ? because they say there wage are crap and the pensions rubbish ?? I decided not to go to university and therefore limited my chances of a well paid career with great terms and conditions. Why, I didn't got to uni, and have a thriving business and am well paid ? My choice and no-one else is to blame. Personally, if I was being told to accept a pay freeze for the fourth year running, work longer, pay more into my pension and get less when I retire by people who've never taught a lesson in their lives, as well as being told that I will be paid by results despite being poorly resourced, whilst other public sector workers (MPs) in Parliament are awarding themselves with an 11% increase for total incompetence, I'd be withdrawing my labour too. Ok your free to find another job. I'm a parent, and I just want my children to be taught by well trained, dedicated teachers, who just want to get on with the job, rather than keep on being distracted by idiots in the Department of Education with an axe to grind against Unions and others who have a fetish for form-filling, box-ticking and bureaucracy. I also don't like the idea of a stressed out, angry and demoralised 67 year old teaching my kids. A lot of what children learns is done at home, its not the sole responsibility of schools to educate our kids. As for all the Union-haters on here; feel free to pay for private healthcare and education and don't ask the state for any financial help if you end up out of work. I do, and am entitled to nothing from the state because, wait for it, I actually saved a few quid instead of spending it on beer and fags. Put thing in place to secure the future should the crap hit the fan. Also, be sure to hand back all those working rights, weekends, holidays, maternity/paternity leave and health and safety back to your employers whilst negotiating your own pay rises and let us know how it works out for you. Either walk the walk or shut up. I back the teachers. Remember they are free to get any job they want, including the private sector schools, if your not happy with your job, pay, pension, etc FIND ANOTHER JOB ![/p][/quote]But when most jobs are in the Public Sector then they rates have to be competitive to those in the Private Sector if you want to have the best, and keep the best to teach children - but when pay is frozen for 5 years and the Pensions are being illegally lowered, compared to what is happening in the Private sector, and the paperwork is on the increase (in both the Public and Private sector due to Ofsted) then there are valid reasons to take industrial action - it is what happens in the Private sector, so why should the Public sector be any different? BWFC71
  • Score: -6

8:44pm Wed 19 Mar 14

fatboybwfc says...

Balboa wrote:
Just sack them. Had enough of moaning, whingeing, complaining, ungrateful teachers anyway. They never appreciate anything and want it all their own way, being told what to do by their union masters, who incidentally take part of the teachers' salary in subscriptions and funding.
well said if you don't like it change job
[quote][p][bold]Balboa[/bold] wrote: Just sack them. Had enough of moaning, whingeing, complaining, ungrateful teachers anyway. They never appreciate anything and want it all their own way, being told what to do by their union masters, who incidentally take part of the teachers' salary in subscriptions and funding.[/p][/quote]well said if you don't like it change job fatboybwfc
  • Score: -2

9:21pm Wed 19 Mar 14

ToyBarn says...

breightmet kid wrote:
Teachers have very good jobs, well paid, with secure pensions. What more do they want? I think they should be paid on results of their efforts, that is on how well their pupils do in the examinations. The vast majority of schools in Bolton under perform, as the published figures show, so teachers salaries should be re-assessed to show this. Also how many children are leaving school unable to read, write or add up properly? Another reflection on poor teaching standards.

Get back to work and do the job properly, our kids lives depend on you.
I think you'll find your kids lives depend on YOU, as mine do on me. Please tell me any other profession where a worker's pay is wholly dependent on the whimsy of hormonal and irrational human beings who are more interested in the mobile phones and umpteen games consoles they own, that - incidently - their parents shouldn't allow them to live on if they're serious about education. The vast majority of schools in Bolton underperform? Wow - we must be a magnet for all the worst teachers... no wait, maybe it could be us as a town, a community, a culture that's the problem. After all, kids spend more time out of school than in it.
[quote][p][bold]breightmet kid[/bold] wrote: Teachers have very good jobs, well paid, with secure pensions. What more do they want? I think they should be paid on results of their efforts, that is on how well their pupils do in the examinations. The vast majority of schools in Bolton under perform, as the published figures show, so teachers salaries should be re-assessed to show this. Also how many children are leaving school unable to read, write or add up properly? Another reflection on poor teaching standards. Get back to work and do the job properly, our kids lives depend on you.[/p][/quote]I think you'll find your kids lives depend on YOU, as mine do on me. Please tell me any other profession where a worker's pay is wholly dependent on the whimsy of hormonal and irrational human beings who are more interested in the mobile phones and umpteen games consoles they own, that - incidently - their parents shouldn't allow them to live on if they're serious about education. The vast majority of schools in Bolton underperform? Wow - we must be a magnet for all the worst teachers... no wait, maybe it could be us as a town, a community, a culture that's the problem. After all, kids spend more time out of school than in it. ToyBarn
  • Score: 6

9:36pm Wed 19 Mar 14

ToyBarn says...

Iluminati wrote:
Well well. The teachers are at it again. This time it's the paperwork. Next time is something else, any excuse to strike ! Too much paperwork equates to too much pressure, but no pressure at all in taking a fistful of over generous holidays and a more then generous pension scheme. On top of all this, a well organised strike is always welcome and eases the pressure. What a lot of spoiled people they're. Next time I come onto this world, I definitely want to become a teacher!!!!!!!!!
Why wait until next time? Do it now! You make it sound like money for old rope anyway! In fact you'd think there'd be thousands of unemployed teachers because there just aren't enough schools to fit the demand. Oh wait... there's actually a shortage in some subjects. How does that work? Could it be that the job is tough, stressful, all-encompassing? Maybe, just maybe, not everyone can do it, but in fact it takes a special type of person. Maybe they deserve a bit more respect. Maybe you'll find out when you give it a go - you and the dozens of others on here who think it's a doddle. I look forward to scraping you off a classroom floor.
[quote][p][bold]Iluminati[/bold] wrote: Well well. The teachers are at it again. This time it's the paperwork. Next time is something else, any excuse to strike ! Too much paperwork equates to too much pressure, but no pressure at all in taking a fistful of over generous holidays and a more then generous pension scheme. On top of all this, a well organised strike is always welcome and eases the pressure. What a lot of spoiled people they're. Next time I come onto this world, I definitely want to become a teacher!!!!!!!!![/p][/quote]Why wait until next time? Do it now! You make it sound like money for old rope anyway! In fact you'd think there'd be thousands of unemployed teachers because there just aren't enough schools to fit the demand. Oh wait... there's actually a shortage in some subjects. How does that work? Could it be that the job is tough, stressful, all-encompassing? Maybe, just maybe, not everyone can do it, but in fact it takes a special type of person. Maybe they deserve a bit more respect. Maybe you'll find out when you give it a go - you and the dozens of others on here who think it's a doddle. I look forward to scraping you off a classroom floor. ToyBarn
  • Score: 5

1:10pm Fri 21 Mar 14

gemgib says...

My son goes to Thornleigh and he came home with a letter to say that the teachers will be striking.
I understand the reasons behind all this, however the thing that I disagree with is that the school is big on attendance and a meeting at the beginning of the school year they went into a lot of detail explaining how many hours our children lose and they provided figures of the number of hours over 5 years.

Tit for tat, pot calling kettle springs to mind.
My son goes to Thornleigh and he came home with a letter to say that the teachers will be striking. I understand the reasons behind all this, however the thing that I disagree with is that the school is big on attendance and a meeting at the beginning of the school year they went into a lot of detail explaining how many hours our children lose and they provided figures of the number of hours over 5 years. Tit for tat, pot calling kettle springs to mind. gemgib
  • Score: 4

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