Bolton's two new UKIP councillors 'will be first of many', says Nigel Farage

Bolton's two new UKIP councillors 'will be first of many', says Nigel Farage

Bolton's first UKIP councillors Paul Richardson and Diane Parkinson celebrate their success

UKIP leader Nigel Farage

First published in News
Last updated
The Bolton News: Photograph of the Author Exclusive by , politics reporter

BOLTON’S two newly elected UKIP councillors — the first in Greater Manchester — will be the first of many according to the party’s leader Nigel Farage.

Paul Richardson was elected councillor in Little Lever and Darcy Lever, taking over Labour’s Maureen Connell, while Diane Parkinson scooped victory in Hulton over the Conservative deputy leader Andy Morgan.

At a tense count at Bolton Arena on Thursday night, UKIP campaigners celebrated as they rocketed to second place in other key Labour strongholds, including Kearsley, Tonge with the Haulgh and Farnworth.

Speaking to The Bolton News after Thursday’s election shock Mr Farage said the party has made significant dents by taking away votes from the mainstream parties.

He added: “These two seats in Bolton are our first in Greater Manchester but I have no doubt they will not be the last.

"We represent the views of ordinary people who have been neglected and ignored by Labour and the Conservatives, as these two results demonstrate.

“It is also significant that in many wards we came second and next time round we would expect to win those seats too.

"Labour has been complacent and is now paying the price, including in northern towns and cities in their traditional heartland.”

Grandfather-of-17 and retired musician Mr Richardson, aged 68, said he and Ms Parkinson were committed to improving the whole of Bolton for its residents — and using their new-found positions to launch UKIP’s bid for a parliamentary seat in Bolton in 2015.

He added: “There’s only two of us — but it’s not impossible to raise some of the other parties from their slumber and shake things up.

“It’s not comfortable any more. Where they were previously rearranging the deckchairs on the Titantic every few years — the frustrated, silent majority have come out to vote for us.

“Labour’s strategy during the elections was to ignore us, thinking ‘they will go away’. That was a big mistake.”


MORE:


The pair has identified town centre regeneration, more parking provision and fair distribution of area forum money as their top priorities.

But they did not rule out joining forces with members of the other parties on these issues.

Mrs Parkinson, a mother-of-two who works in credit control, said: “We want to work towards increasing the types of shops that are in the town centre, beyond pawn and charity shops.

“We want to give the public more of a say — by being more available than other councillors, and help them when they want change.”

Mr Farage has now confirmed that he will stand for as a candidate in the next general election, probably in Kent.

Comments (70)

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3:18pm Fri 23 May 14

BibbleBobble says...

“We want to work towards increasing the types of shops that are in the town centre, beyond pawn and charity shops."

Very well said. Our once beautiful town centre is a mere shadow of its former glory. But do you know it's taken the Labour run Council a long time and required lot of effort to take it to such depths?
“We want to work towards increasing the types of shops that are in the town centre, beyond pawn and charity shops." Very well said. Our once beautiful town centre is a mere shadow of its former glory. But do you know it's taken the Labour run Council a long time and required lot of effort to take it to such depths? BibbleBobble
  • Score: 55

3:32pm Fri 23 May 14

zoomzam says...

Sadly these racists have started encroaching into Bolton....and they think by closing doors they will help the working classes??? Clueless!
Sadly these racists have started encroaching into Bolton....and they think by closing doors they will help the working classes??? Clueless! zoomzam
  • Score: -76

3:58pm Fri 23 May 14

Jim271 says...

zoomzam wrote:
Sadly these racists have started encroaching into Bolton....and they think by closing doors they will help the working classes??? Clueless!
What do you think the Muslims have been doing the last 20 years,

Muslims don't vote for a party they vote for other Muslims who will rubber stamp all their building projects no matter who objects,

EG Halliwell Road Coucillor Zahman

Traffic Wardens at the top end, no traffic enforcement around the mosque,

New Muslim only nursery Hennon St,

Robin Hood pub, permission for a white person to open a nursery refused, permission for an Asian to open a gym granted,

Houses built on fields next to Borwnlow Way allocated to immigrants only,

New houses built on Green Belt Land.

Councillor Zahman promising to enforce smoking bans in pubs on Halliwell Road as he claims its "making the area look untidy"

Halliwell and Crompton has been taken over, soon it will be segregated schools and loudspeakers will the call to prayers,
[quote][p][bold]zoomzam[/bold] wrote: Sadly these racists have started encroaching into Bolton....and they think by closing doors they will help the working classes??? Clueless![/p][/quote]What do you think the Muslims have been doing the last 20 years, Muslims don't vote for a party they vote for other Muslims who will rubber stamp all their building projects no matter who objects, EG Halliwell Road Coucillor Zahman Traffic Wardens at the top end, no traffic enforcement around the mosque, New Muslim only nursery Hennon St, Robin Hood pub, permission for a white person to open a nursery refused, permission for an Asian to open a gym granted, Houses built on fields next to Borwnlow Way allocated to immigrants only, New houses built on Green Belt Land. Councillor Zahman promising to enforce smoking bans in pubs on Halliwell Road as he claims its "making the area look untidy" Halliwell and Crompton has been taken over, soon it will be segregated schools and loudspeakers will the call to prayers, Jim271
  • Score: 101

3:58pm Fri 23 May 14

DENBO1948 says...

RACIST!! yes I voted UKIP in the local elections and shall do next year, as for being racist ha ha I have plenty of friends some are coloured some white or should I say honky, never have been a racist though..
RACIST!! yes I voted UKIP in the local elections and shall do next year, as for being racist ha ha I have plenty of friends some are coloured some white or should I say honky, never have been a racist though.. DENBO1948
  • Score: 45

4:21pm Fri 23 May 14

markthementalist says...

I live in the Halliwell area and voted at my local polling station. I voted UKIP as rampant immigration is sadly bringing down my area. In the station to collect my sheet I was with 2 white people and 22 Indian/Pakistani's. My vote was and wasn't wasted as I used my electoral voice but I knew my vote would not influence anything. When will ALL the people in my area vote?
Laziness is not as rampant as immigration I am afraid.
I live in the Halliwell area and voted at my local polling station. I voted UKIP as rampant immigration is sadly bringing down my area. In the station to collect my sheet I was with 2 white people and 22 Indian/Pakistani's. My vote was and wasn't wasted as I used my electoral voice but I knew my vote would not influence anything. When will ALL the people in my area vote? Laziness is not as rampant as immigration I am afraid. markthementalist
  • Score: 68

5:17pm Fri 23 May 14

OriginalAngryDad says...

zoomzam wrote:
Sadly these racists have started encroaching into Bolton....and they think by closing doors they will help the working classes??? Clueless!
I take it that you referring to Bolton's Muslim population, because a more inherently racist bunch you will not find.....

Sadly, I fear it's too late, as they already hold considerable sway in local politics.

Try voting UKIP next time........you never know.........
[quote][p][bold]zoomzam[/bold] wrote: Sadly these racists have started encroaching into Bolton....and they think by closing doors they will help the working classes??? Clueless![/p][/quote]I take it that you referring to Bolton's Muslim population, because a more inherently racist bunch you will not find..... Sadly, I fear it's too late, as they already hold considerable sway in local politics. Try voting UKIP next time........you never know......... OriginalAngryDad
  • Score: 48

5:18pm Fri 23 May 14

Randolf Litler !!! says...

Jim271 and markthementalist

Bloody well said and truthful, this country is a nothing but a s h i t e h o l e now with uncontrolled immigration over the last 40 years and unbelievably it's still going on.
What will it be like in bolton in 5, 10, 20, years, i pity our future generations.it's
DISGRACEFUL.
Jim271 and markthementalist Bloody well said and truthful, this country is a nothing but a s h i t e h o l e now with uncontrolled immigration over the last 40 years and unbelievably it's still going on. What will it be like in bolton in 5, 10, 20, years, i pity our future generations.it's DISGRACEFUL. Randolf Litler !!!
  • Score: 44

5:28pm Fri 23 May 14

Randolf Litler !!! says...

OriginalAngryDad wrote:
zoomzam wrote:
Sadly these racists have started encroaching into Bolton....and they think by closing doors they will help the working classes??? Clueless!
I take it that you referring to Bolton's Muslim population, because a more inherently racist bunch you will not find.....

Sadly, I fear it's too late, as they already hold considerable sway in local politics.

Try voting UKIP next time........you never know.........
I fully agree with your comment about "a more inherently racist bunch you will not find"

By the way all you non white racists, it's just a thought but how many white people are employed in every take-away on derby st-st helens road- dean road....Not a single one from over at least 30 take - aways.
How many whites are employed in all the other so called businesses around there too....NONE.
You all stick to your own kind and spend your money in asian shops and businesses therefor keeping the money in a continuous circle.
What a disgrace this country has become
[quote][p][bold]OriginalAngryDad[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]zoomzam[/bold] wrote: Sadly these racists have started encroaching into Bolton....and they think by closing doors they will help the working classes??? Clueless![/p][/quote]I take it that you referring to Bolton's Muslim population, because a more inherently racist bunch you will not find..... Sadly, I fear it's too late, as they already hold considerable sway in local politics. Try voting UKIP next time........you never know.........[/p][/quote]I fully agree with your comment about "a more inherently racist bunch you will not find" By the way all you non white racists, it's just a thought but how many white people are employed in every take-away on derby st-st helens road- dean road....Not a single one from over at least 30 take - aways. How many whites are employed in all the other so called businesses around there too....NONE. You all stick to your own kind and spend your money in asian shops and businesses therefor keeping the money in a continuous circle. What a disgrace this country has become Randolf Litler !!!
  • Score: 100

5:30pm Fri 23 May 14

Reality50 says...

Sooner Labour are removed from the town hall the better.
Sooner Labour are removed from the town hall the better. Reality50
  • Score: 66

5:33pm Fri 23 May 14

notgonehome says...

Well done to UKIP and the shock will be after the counts on Sunday.
Well done to UKIP and the shock will be after the counts on Sunday. notgonehome
  • Score: 55

6:07pm Fri 23 May 14

Puffin-Billy says...

UKIP Cllr Diane Parkinson, who represents the people of Hulton in Bolton, admires UKIP and all that they stand for; and she gives her full support to Nigel Farage, the leader of UKIP.

Is she and the people of Hulton aware that Nigel Farage is co-President with Francesco Speroni, of a far right European group of parties?

Is Cllr Parkinson aware that UKIP is a member of a group called Europe of Freedom and Democracy (EFD) ?

Are Cllr Parkinson and her supporters aware that the EFD is composed of the Danish People’s Party, the True Finns Party, the Dutch SGP and the Italian Lega Nord - and that Francesco Speroni, a leading member of the Northern League, has maintained that the Norwegian mass murderer Anders Behring Breivik's ideas are "...in defence of western civilisation." ?

Does Cllr Parkinson, and do her supporters agree with Speroni?

Is Cllr Parkinson aware that Mario Borghezio of the EFD, has said in a radio interview that Breivik had some "excellent" ideas? Does Diane Parkinson agree with Borghezio?

Is Cllr Parkinson aware that Borghezio also pronounced on radio: "Long live the Whites of Europe, long live our identity, our ethnicity, our race… our blue sky, like the eyes of our women. Blue, in a people who want to stay white."? Does she agree with him?

Does Cllr Parkinson not question why the person she admires so much, Nigel Farage, continues to co-preside over the EFD along with the leader of Lega Nord ?

Does Cllr Parkinson not question why MEP Nikki Sinclaire has been expelled from Ukip? She was in fact expelled for refusing to take part in the EFD because of their “extreme views”. Is Diane Parkinson not worried by this fact?

Is Cllr Parkinson aware that Ukip’s only female MEP, Marta Andreasen, has threatened to leave the party, labelling Farage as an “anti-women Stalinist dictator” whose view is that “women should be in the kitchen or in the bedroom”. Does Diane Parkinson agree with Andreasen?

Is Cllr Parkinson aware that Olly Neville, the former UKIP Youth Chairman, has been sacked for supporting same-sex marriage - does she agree that Neville should have been sacked?
UKIP Cllr Diane Parkinson, who represents the people of Hulton in Bolton, admires UKIP and all that they stand for; and she gives her full support to Nigel Farage, the leader of UKIP. Is she and the people of Hulton aware that Nigel Farage is co-President with Francesco Speroni, of a far right European group of parties? Is Cllr Parkinson aware that UKIP is a member of a group called Europe of Freedom and Democracy (EFD) ? Are Cllr Parkinson and her supporters aware that the EFD is composed of the Danish People’s Party, the True Finns Party, the Dutch SGP and the Italian Lega Nord - and that Francesco Speroni, a leading member of the Northern League, has maintained that the Norwegian mass murderer Anders Behring Breivik's ideas are "...in defence of western civilisation." ? Does Cllr Parkinson, and do her supporters agree with Speroni? Is Cllr Parkinson aware that Mario Borghezio of the EFD, has said in a radio interview that Breivik had some "excellent" ideas? Does Diane Parkinson agree with Borghezio? Is Cllr Parkinson aware that Borghezio also pronounced on radio: "Long live the Whites of Europe, long live our identity, our ethnicity, our race… our blue sky, like the eyes of our women. Blue, in a people who want to stay white."? Does she agree with him? Does Cllr Parkinson not question why the person she admires so much, Nigel Farage, continues to co-preside over the EFD along with the leader of Lega Nord ? Does Cllr Parkinson not question why MEP Nikki Sinclaire has been expelled from Ukip? She was in fact expelled for refusing to take part in the EFD because of their “extreme views”. Is Diane Parkinson not worried by this fact? Is Cllr Parkinson aware that Ukip’s only female MEP, Marta Andreasen, has threatened to leave the party, labelling Farage as an “anti-women Stalinist dictator” whose view is that “women should be in the kitchen or in the bedroom”. Does Diane Parkinson agree with Andreasen? Is Cllr Parkinson aware that Olly Neville, the former UKIP Youth Chairman, has been sacked for supporting same-sex marriage - does she agree that Neville should have been sacked? Puffin-Billy
  • Score: -77

6:19pm Fri 23 May 14

Randolf Litler !!! says...

Puffin-Billy wrote:
UKIP Cllr Diane Parkinson, who represents the people of Hulton in Bolton, admires UKIP and all that they stand for; and she gives her full support to Nigel Farage, the leader of UKIP.

Is she and the people of Hulton aware that Nigel Farage is co-President with Francesco Speroni, of a far right European group of parties?

Is Cllr Parkinson aware that UKIP is a member of a group called Europe of Freedom and Democracy (EFD) ?

Are Cllr Parkinson and her supporters aware that the EFD is composed of the Danish People’s Party, the True Finns Party, the Dutch SGP and the Italian Lega Nord - and that Francesco Speroni, a leading member of the Northern League, has maintained that the Norwegian mass murderer Anders Behring Breivik's ideas are "...in defence of western civilisation." ?

Does Cllr Parkinson, and do her supporters agree with Speroni?

Is Cllr Parkinson aware that Mario Borghezio of the EFD, has said in a radio interview that Breivik had some "excellent" ideas? Does Diane Parkinson agree with Borghezio?

Is Cllr Parkinson aware that Borghezio also pronounced on radio: "Long live the Whites of Europe, long live our identity, our ethnicity, our race… our blue sky, like the eyes of our women. Blue, in a people who want to stay white."? Does she agree with him?

Does Cllr Parkinson not question why the person she admires so much, Nigel Farage, continues to co-preside over the EFD along with the leader of Lega Nord ?

Does Cllr Parkinson not question why MEP Nikki Sinclaire has been expelled from Ukip? She was in fact expelled for refusing to take part in the EFD because of their “extreme views”. Is Diane Parkinson not worried by this fact?

Is Cllr Parkinson aware that Ukip’s only female MEP, Marta Andreasen, has threatened to leave the party, labelling Farage as an “anti-women Stalinist dictator” whose view is that “women should be in the kitchen or in the bedroom”. Does Diane Parkinson agree with Andreasen?

Is Cllr Parkinson aware that Olly Neville, the former UKIP Youth Chairman, has been sacked for supporting same-sex marriage - does she agree that Neville should have been sacked?
Not sure if the councilor Cllr Diane Parkinson was aware of all the above but thanks for the information as we are all now AWARE.
I say i support a lot of the above but not all of it so thanks for the information billy :-)
[quote][p][bold]Puffin-Billy[/bold] wrote: UKIP Cllr Diane Parkinson, who represents the people of Hulton in Bolton, admires UKIP and all that they stand for; and she gives her full support to Nigel Farage, the leader of UKIP. Is she and the people of Hulton aware that Nigel Farage is co-President with Francesco Speroni, of a far right European group of parties? Is Cllr Parkinson aware that UKIP is a member of a group called Europe of Freedom and Democracy (EFD) ? Are Cllr Parkinson and her supporters aware that the EFD is composed of the Danish People’s Party, the True Finns Party, the Dutch SGP and the Italian Lega Nord - and that Francesco Speroni, a leading member of the Northern League, has maintained that the Norwegian mass murderer Anders Behring Breivik's ideas are "...in defence of western civilisation." ? Does Cllr Parkinson, and do her supporters agree with Speroni? Is Cllr Parkinson aware that Mario Borghezio of the EFD, has said in a radio interview that Breivik had some "excellent" ideas? Does Diane Parkinson agree with Borghezio? Is Cllr Parkinson aware that Borghezio also pronounced on radio: "Long live the Whites of Europe, long live our identity, our ethnicity, our race… our blue sky, like the eyes of our women. Blue, in a people who want to stay white."? Does she agree with him? Does Cllr Parkinson not question why the person she admires so much, Nigel Farage, continues to co-preside over the EFD along with the leader of Lega Nord ? Does Cllr Parkinson not question why MEP Nikki Sinclaire has been expelled from Ukip? She was in fact expelled for refusing to take part in the EFD because of their “extreme views”. Is Diane Parkinson not worried by this fact? Is Cllr Parkinson aware that Ukip’s only female MEP, Marta Andreasen, has threatened to leave the party, labelling Farage as an “anti-women Stalinist dictator” whose view is that “women should be in the kitchen or in the bedroom”. Does Diane Parkinson agree with Andreasen? Is Cllr Parkinson aware that Olly Neville, the former UKIP Youth Chairman, has been sacked for supporting same-sex marriage - does she agree that Neville should have been sacked?[/p][/quote]Not sure if the councilor Cllr Diane Parkinson was aware of all the above but thanks for the information as we are all now AWARE. I say i support a lot of the above but not all of it so thanks for the information billy :-) Randolf Litler !!!
  • Score: -6

6:30pm Fri 23 May 14

pecky2k says...

Vote for whoever you want, nothing changes! Same people are still pulling strings behind the scenes.
Vote for whoever you want, nothing changes! Same people are still pulling strings behind the scenes. pecky2k
  • Score: 12

6:35pm Fri 23 May 14

Liamdog says...

About time, this country may finally be waking up to the loss of our heritage , culture, and way of life. Ukip are the only party standing up for the average uk citizen.
About time, this country may finally be waking up to the loss of our heritage , culture, and way of life. Ukip are the only party standing up for the average uk citizen. Liamdog
  • Score: 46

6:53pm Fri 23 May 14

markthementalist says...

markthementalist wrote:
I live in the Halliwell area and voted at my local polling station. I voted UKIP as rampant immigration is sadly bringing down my area. In the station to collect my sheet I was with 2 white people and 22 Indian/Pakistani's. My vote was and wasn't wasted as I used my electoral voice but I knew my vote would not influence anything. When will ALL the people in my area vote?
Laziness is not as rampant as immigration I am afraid.
* Laziness IS as rampant as immigration.........
......typing too quickly to get my point across! Lazy folk moan about this and that but they can't be bothered to go out and vote.
Note to these people........the polling station was just round the corner from the off licence. You could have called in on the way there/back.
[quote][p][bold]markthementalist[/bold] wrote: I live in the Halliwell area and voted at my local polling station. I voted UKIP as rampant immigration is sadly bringing down my area. In the station to collect my sheet I was with 2 white people and 22 Indian/Pakistani's. My vote was and wasn't wasted as I used my electoral voice but I knew my vote would not influence anything. When will ALL the people in my area vote? Laziness is not as rampant as immigration I am afraid.[/p][/quote]* Laziness IS as rampant as immigration......... ......typing too quickly to get my point across! Lazy folk moan about this and that but they can't be bothered to go out and vote. Note to these people........the polling station was just round the corner from the off licence. You could have called in on the way there/back. markthementalist
  • Score: 17

7:01pm Fri 23 May 14

A Campbell says...

Liamdog wrote:
About time, this country may finally be waking up to the loss of our heritage , culture, and way of life. Ukip are the only party standing up for the average uk citizen.
"Liamdog", you say UKIP are the only party standing up for the average uk citizen?

Are you aware of any of UKIP's domestic policies? Like 90% of the idiots who voted UKIP I guess you are not.
[quote][p][bold]Liamdog[/bold] wrote: About time, this country may finally be waking up to the loss of our heritage , culture, and way of life. Ukip are the only party standing up for the average uk citizen.[/p][/quote]"Liamdog", you say UKIP are the only party standing up for the average uk citizen? Are you aware of any of UKIP's domestic policies? Like 90% of the idiots who voted UKIP I guess you are not. A Campbell
  • Score: -45

7:44pm Fri 23 May 14

boltonfree says...

Well done ukip I say. Everyone moaning about ukip doing well should ask why none of the other main parties took ukip seriously as if they did and listened to the voters then this might not of happened but then again it might of. It's not like no one has heard of ukip before. The conservatives, labour and lib deems have knackered this country up and as far as I know ukip haven't so they seem to be better at politics then the others
Well done ukip I say. Everyone moaning about ukip doing well should ask why none of the other main parties took ukip seriously as if they did and listened to the voters then this might not of happened but then again it might of. It's not like no one has heard of ukip before. The conservatives, labour and lib deems have knackered this country up and as far as I know ukip haven't so they seem to be better at politics then the others boltonfree
  • Score: 26

7:50pm Fri 23 May 14

BlueRay79 says...

A Campbell wrote:
Liamdog wrote:
About time, this country may finally be waking up to the loss of our heritage , culture, and way of life. Ukip are the only party standing up for the average uk citizen.
"Liamdog", you say UKIP are the only party standing up for the average uk citizen?

Are you aware of any of UKIP's domestic policies? Like 90% of the idiots who voted UKIP I guess you are not.
Yes. Their policies are about common sense for once. Have a read of them here:

http://www.ukip-ynl.
org/ukip-manifesto-2
014.pdf
[quote][p][bold]A Campbell[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Liamdog[/bold] wrote: About time, this country may finally be waking up to the loss of our heritage , culture, and way of life. Ukip are the only party standing up for the average uk citizen.[/p][/quote]"Liamdog", you say UKIP are the only party standing up for the average uk citizen? Are you aware of any of UKIP's domestic policies? Like 90% of the idiots who voted UKIP I guess you are not.[/p][/quote]Yes. Their policies are about common sense for once. Have a read of them here: http://www.ukip-ynl. org/ukip-manifesto-2 014.pdf BlueRay79
  • Score: 18

8:10pm Fri 23 May 14

Liamdog says...

A Campbell wrote:
Liamdog wrote:
About time, this country may finally be waking up to the loss of our heritage , culture, and way of life. Ukip are the only party standing up for the average uk citizen.
"Liamdog", you say UKIP are the only party standing up for the average uk citizen?

Are you aware of any of UKIP's domestic policies? Like 90% of the idiots who voted UKIP I guess you are not.
Put your vegan meal for one back in the oven a while , set aside your political correctness and airy fairy thoughts and. Take a walk up Derby st, Deane rd, Halliwell rd and tell me the main stream parties have been good for our town and country !
[quote][p][bold]A Campbell[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Liamdog[/bold] wrote: About time, this country may finally be waking up to the loss of our heritage , culture, and way of life. Ukip are the only party standing up for the average uk citizen.[/p][/quote]"Liamdog", you say UKIP are the only party standing up for the average uk citizen? Are you aware of any of UKIP's domestic policies? Like 90% of the idiots who voted UKIP I guess you are not.[/p][/quote]Put your vegan meal for one back in the oven a while , set aside your political correctness and airy fairy thoughts and. Take a walk up Derby st, Deane rd, Halliwell rd and tell me the main stream parties have been good for our town and country ! Liamdog
  • Score: 35

8:16pm Fri 23 May 14

mark donaldson says...

Well done to UKIP.
Not only did UKIP take two seats in Bolton, they came second in every other ward; something that is not reported widely.
All the slander and vilification hurled at them over the past few months has only made their support stronger.
Council leader, Cliff Morris recently stated that all the immigrants coming to Bolton showed what a great place it is to live in. How out of touch can a politician be?
Well done to UKIP. Not only did UKIP take two seats in Bolton, they came second in every other ward; something that is not reported widely. All the slander and vilification hurled at them over the past few months has only made their support stronger. Council leader, Cliff Morris recently stated that all the immigrants coming to Bolton showed what a great place it is to live in. How out of touch can a politician be? mark donaldson
  • Score: 36

8:37pm Fri 23 May 14

MasterOfPuppets says...

Really? REALLY!? You're not racist you have "coloured" friends? COLOURED!? What is this, 1952? Do you really think having a local UKIP council will be able to do anything about the EU and immigration? LOL! It's not going to change anything!
Really? REALLY!? You're not racist you have "coloured" friends? COLOURED!? What is this, 1952? Do you really think having a local UKIP council will be able to do anything about the EU and immigration? LOL! It's not going to change anything! MasterOfPuppets
  • Score: -16

8:54pm Fri 23 May 14

Puffin-Billy says...

http://www.hopenotha
te.org.uk/subscribe/

....................
....................
....................
...............
This is what soldiers in 1914 died for.
This is what Bolton UKIP Cllr Parkinson admires.
This is what Bolton UKIP supporters admire.

....................
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A far right group has said it will step up security for Ukip leader Nigel Farage’s visit to Edinburgh tonight by deploying armoured vehicles and ex-military personnel to protect him.
Britain First, which is fielding its own candidates in the European elections, said it was not prepared to allow “fellow patriots” to be “bullied off our streets”.
http://www.edinburgh
news.scotsman.com/ne
ws/nigel-farage-face
s-barrage-of-edinbur
gh-protest-1-3404499

.................
A gang of teenagers terrorised a town's Muslim community, attacking two elderly men and an eight-year-old boy, a court heard.
http://www.expressan
dstar.com/news/2014/
04/30/teenagers-terr
orised-muslim-commun
ity-in-town/
....................
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Strip public of the vote says Ukip candidate
http://www.politics.
co.uk/news/2014/05/1
3/strip-public-of-th
e-vote-says-ukip-can
didate
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*“We must pray for the gay community that they will see that they are indeed prisoners who need freedom.”
http://www.basingsto
kegazette.co.uk/news
/11230101._/?
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*You’re one of us, Dutch xenophobe Geert Wilders tells Nigel Farage
http://www.hopenotha
te.org.uk/news/home/
article/3211/yoursqu
ore-one-of-us-dutch-
xenophobe-geert-wild
ers-tells-nigel-fara
ge
....................
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*"Any normal and fair-minded person would have a perfect right to be concerned if a group of Romanian people suddenly moved in next door."
http://www.bbc.co.uk
/news/uk-27459923
....................
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*Enid Lindsay, who is standing in Fazakerley , called voters “idiots”, while Clubmoor’s Paul Forrest claimed “racism is a natural outcome of evolution” and said the Catholic church is “far more dangerous” than the Ku Klux Klan (KKK).
....................
...................
Meanwhile John Halvorsen, a candidate in Everton , lists the Liverpool division of the far-right English Defence League among his “likes” on Facebook. He is also a member of an online group called “Was Enoch Powell Right?”.
http://www.liverpool
echo.co.uk/news/live
rpool-news/wannabe-l
iverpool-ukip-counci
llor-wants-7134800
....................
..........

Ukip chairwoman Janice Atkinson who called for protesters who ‘hurl abuse’ to be arrested caught swearing at anti-racism activists
Janice Atkinson, who is the party’s South East chair and described herself as Nigel Farage’s “number two”, was pictured raising her middle finger at members of the People’s Assembly in Ashford, Kent.
http://www.independe
nt.co.uk/news/uk/pol
itics/ukip-chairwoma
n-janice-atkinson-wh
o-called-for-protest
ers-who-hurl-abuse-t
o-be-arrested-Accord
ing to the protesters, former Tory candidate Ms Atkinson made “personal comments about body size”, and said: “I don't care where you f***ing post this, just f**k off!”caught-sweari
ng-at-antiracism-act
ivists-9392147.html
....................
......
Gerard Batten alongside far-right Dutch politician Geert Wilders.
http://www.politics.
co.uk/news/2014/05/1
6/ukip-mep-threatens
-to-prosecute-anti-r
acism-group
....................
..
Heino Vockrodt, who is standing for the Dudden Hill seat on May 22, accused Muslims of grooming sex slaves, compared a Willesden road to war torn Helmand Province and claimed Islam was an ideology not a religion.
http://www.kilburnti
mes.co.uk/news/race_
row_erupts_after_bre
nt_ukip_candidate_sl
ates_muslims_in_rant
ing_email_1_3600791?
usurv=skip
....................
.............
Dutch populist Geert Wilders said Wednesday he still hopes to bring Britain's anti-EU leader Nigel Farage into an alliance with France's Marine Le Pen despite her party's perceived anti-Semitism.
http://www.globalpos
t.com/dispatch/news/
afp/140514/dutch-pop
ulist-still-hopes-fa
rage-le-pen-alliance

....................
.....
A British Asian leader of Ukip’s youth wing has quit the party, branding it “racist” and “terrifying”.

Sanya-Jeet Thandi, who had been introduced at Ukip’s party conference as a future leader, said the party has abandoned its core supporters and now appealed to the “stupidity of ignorant anti-immigrant voters for electoral gain”.
http://www.hopenotha
te.org.uk/news/home/
article/3192/british
-asian-ukip-youth-le
ader-quits-racist-an
d-terrifying-ukip
..................
Ukip faces a “cash-for-Euro-sea
ts” scandal after forcing MEPs to donate large sums and threatening to bar those who refused from standing again, its former deputy leader says.
http://www.thetimes.
co.uk/tto/news/polit
ics/article4089092.e
ce?CMP=OTH-gnws-stan
dard-2014_05_13
http://www.hopenotha te.org.uk/subscribe/ .................... .................... .................... ............... This is what soldiers in 1914 died for. This is what Bolton UKIP Cllr Parkinson admires. This is what Bolton UKIP supporters admire. .................... ......... A far right group has said it will step up security for Ukip leader Nigel Farage’s visit to Edinburgh tonight by deploying armoured vehicles and ex-military personnel to protect him. Britain First, which is fielding its own candidates in the European elections, said it was not prepared to allow “fellow patriots” to be “bullied off our streets”. http://www.edinburgh news.scotsman.com/ne ws/nigel-farage-face s-barrage-of-edinbur gh-protest-1-3404499 ................. A gang of teenagers terrorised a town's Muslim community, attacking two elderly men and an eight-year-old boy, a court heard. http://www.expressan dstar.com/news/2014/ 04/30/teenagers-terr orised-muslim-commun ity-in-town/ .................... .......... Strip public of the vote says Ukip candidate http://www.politics. co.uk/news/2014/05/1 3/strip-public-of-th e-vote-says-ukip-can didate .................... .......... *“We must pray for the gay community that they will see that they are indeed prisoners who need freedom.” http://www.basingsto kegazette.co.uk/news /11230101._/? .................... ............ *You’re one of us, Dutch xenophobe Geert Wilders tells Nigel Farage http://www.hopenotha te.org.uk/news/home/ article/3211/yoursqu ore-one-of-us-dutch- xenophobe-geert-wild ers-tells-nigel-fara ge .................... .................... .......... *"Any normal and fair-minded person would have a perfect right to be concerned if a group of Romanian people suddenly moved in next door." http://www.bbc.co.uk /news/uk-27459923 .................... ........... *Enid Lindsay, who is standing in Fazakerley , called voters “idiots”, while Clubmoor’s Paul Forrest claimed “racism is a natural outcome of evolution” and said the Catholic church is “far more dangerous” than the Ku Klux Klan (KKK). .................... ................... Meanwhile John Halvorsen, a candidate in Everton , lists the Liverpool division of the far-right English Defence League among his “likes” on Facebook. He is also a member of an online group called “Was Enoch Powell Right?”. http://www.liverpool echo.co.uk/news/live rpool-news/wannabe-l iverpool-ukip-counci llor-wants-7134800 .................... .......... Ukip chairwoman Janice Atkinson who called for protesters who ‘hurl abuse’ to be arrested caught swearing at anti-racism activists Janice Atkinson, who is the party’s South East chair and described herself as Nigel Farage’s “number two”, was pictured raising her middle finger at members of the People’s Assembly in Ashford, Kent. http://www.independe nt.co.uk/news/uk/pol itics/ukip-chairwoma n-janice-atkinson-wh o-called-for-protest ers-who-hurl-abuse-t o-be-arrested-Accord ing to the protesters, former Tory candidate Ms Atkinson made “personal comments about [Ms Pizzey’s] body size”, and said: “I don't care where you f***ing post this, just f**k off!”caught-sweari ng-at-antiracism-act ivists-9392147.html .................... ...... Gerard Batten alongside far-right Dutch politician Geert Wilders. http://www.politics. co.uk/news/2014/05/1 6/ukip-mep-threatens -to-prosecute-anti-r acism-group .................... .. Heino Vockrodt, who is standing for the Dudden Hill seat on May 22, accused Muslims of grooming sex slaves, compared a Willesden road to war torn Helmand Province and claimed Islam was an ideology not a religion. http://www.kilburnti mes.co.uk/news/race_ row_erupts_after_bre nt_ukip_candidate_sl ates_muslims_in_rant ing_email_1_3600791? usurv=skip .................... ............. Dutch populist Geert Wilders said Wednesday he still hopes to bring Britain's anti-EU leader Nigel Farage into an alliance with France's Marine Le Pen despite her party's perceived anti-Semitism. http://www.globalpos t.com/dispatch/news/ afp/140514/dutch-pop ulist-still-hopes-fa rage-le-pen-alliance .................... ..... A British Asian leader of Ukip’s youth wing has quit the party, branding it “racist” and “terrifying”. Sanya-Jeet Thandi, who had been introduced at Ukip’s party conference as a future leader, said the party has abandoned its core supporters and now appealed to the “stupidity of ignorant anti-immigrant voters for electoral gain”. http://www.hopenotha te.org.uk/news/home/ article/3192/british -asian-ukip-youth-le ader-quits-racist-an d-terrifying-ukip .................. Ukip faces a “cash-for-Euro-sea ts” scandal after forcing MEPs to donate large sums and threatening to bar those who refused from standing again, its former deputy leader says. http://www.thetimes. co.uk/tto/news/polit ics/article4089092.e ce?CMP=OTH-gnws-stan dard-2014_05_13 Puffin-Billy
  • Score: -22

9:44pm Fri 23 May 14

Puffin-Billy says...

If you want a good laugh read this:
http://www.hopenotha
te.org.uk/ukip/ukip-
telling-porkies-yet-
again-3794

If you would like to make Britain a better place try this site:
https://donate.hopen
othate.org.uk/page/c
ontribute/help-sprea
d-hope
If you want a good laugh read this: http://www.hopenotha te.org.uk/ukip/ukip- telling-porkies-yet- again-3794 If you would like to make Britain a better place try this site: https://donate.hopen othate.org.uk/page/c ontribute/help-sprea d-hope Puffin-Billy
  • Score: -14

9:59pm Fri 23 May 14

Randolf Litler !!! says...

Hitler would have made a good candidate :-)
Hitler would have made a good candidate :-) Randolf Litler !!!
  • Score: -10

11:14pm Fri 23 May 14

hazy2k says...

Congratulations, you've voted in: scrapping paid maternity leave, raising taxes for the poorest 88% of Brits, scrapping paid holidays, speeding up privitisation of the nhs, cancelling all planned house building & cutting education spending to fund 3 aircraft carriers. Oh , not to mention describing rape as "not such a terrible ordeal". Maybe before voting you should've read their policies. Boltons problems aren't caused by Muslims & immigrants, nor are they going to be fixed by UKIP.
Congratulations, you've voted in: scrapping paid maternity leave, raising taxes for the poorest 88% of Brits, scrapping paid holidays, speeding up privitisation of the nhs, cancelling all planned house building & cutting education spending to fund 3 aircraft carriers. Oh , not to mention describing rape as "not such a terrible ordeal". Maybe before voting you should've read their policies. Boltons problems aren't caused by Muslims & immigrants, nor are they going to be fixed by UKIP. hazy2k
  • Score: -6

11:37pm Fri 23 May 14

Randolf Litler !!! says...

hazy2k wrote:
Congratulations, you've voted in: scrapping paid maternity leave, raising taxes for the poorest 88% of Brits, scrapping paid holidays, speeding up privitisation of the nhs, cancelling all planned house building & cutting education spending to fund 3 aircraft carriers. Oh , not to mention describing rape as "not such a terrible ordeal". Maybe before voting you should've read their policies. Boltons problems aren't caused by Muslims & immigrants, nor are they going to be fixed by UKIP.
No they can't be fixed by UKIP that's because they are 40 years too late
[quote][p][bold]hazy2k[/bold] wrote: Congratulations, you've voted in: scrapping paid maternity leave, raising taxes for the poorest 88% of Brits, scrapping paid holidays, speeding up privitisation of the nhs, cancelling all planned house building & cutting education spending to fund 3 aircraft carriers. Oh , not to mention describing rape as "not such a terrible ordeal". Maybe before voting you should've read their policies. Boltons problems aren't caused by Muslims & immigrants, nor are they going to be fixed by UKIP.[/p][/quote]No they can't be fixed by UKIP that's because they are 40 years too late Randolf Litler !!!
  • Score: 16

1:28am Sat 24 May 14

Reality50 says...

You only have to look 12 miles north,to Blackburn to see what kind of future awaits us. Immigration wise,they have always been a few years ahead of us as Jack Straw actively encouraged the Muslim invasion into Blackburn. Blackburn is now 1 in 3 immigrant-Bolton is about 1 in 5-. Anyone that visits Blackburn knows what a hell hole it is. Labour are quite happy to see this mass immigration continue,as long as it helps Labour win votes. UKIP may not be the ultimate answer,and many would favour a harder line BNP approach,but the BNP are too extreme for some so UKIP seems to many to be a more moderate realistic stance on the EU and immigration. Socialism and Labour have had their time and chances,and i wish the two UKIP councillors all the best.
You only have to look 12 miles north,to Blackburn to see what kind of future awaits us. Immigration wise,they have always been a few years ahead of us as Jack Straw actively encouraged the Muslim invasion into Blackburn. Blackburn is now 1 in 3 immigrant-Bolton is about 1 in 5-. Anyone that visits Blackburn knows what a hell hole it is. Labour are quite happy to see this mass immigration continue,as long as it helps Labour win votes. UKIP may not be the ultimate answer,and many would favour a harder line BNP approach,but the BNP are too extreme for some so UKIP seems to many to be a more moderate realistic stance on the EU and immigration. Socialism and Labour have had their time and chances,and i wish the two UKIP councillors all the best. Reality50
  • Score: 22

1:31am Sat 24 May 14

Randolf Litler !!! says...

Reality50 wrote:
You only have to look 12 miles north,to Blackburn to see what kind of future awaits us. Immigration wise,they have always been a few years ahead of us as Jack Straw actively encouraged the Muslim invasion into Blackburn. Blackburn is now 1 in 3 immigrant-Bolton is about 1 in 5-. Anyone that visits Blackburn knows what a hell hole it is. Labour are quite happy to see this mass immigration continue,as long as it helps Labour win votes. UKIP may not be the ultimate answer,and many would favour a harder line BNP approach,but the BNP are too extreme for some so UKIP seems to many to be a more moderate realistic stance on the EU and immigration. Socialism and Labour have had their time and chances,and i wish the two UKIP councillors all the best.
Well said... spot on mate
[quote][p][bold]Reality50[/bold] wrote: You only have to look 12 miles north,to Blackburn to see what kind of future awaits us. Immigration wise,they have always been a few years ahead of us as Jack Straw actively encouraged the Muslim invasion into Blackburn. Blackburn is now 1 in 3 immigrant-Bolton is about 1 in 5-. Anyone that visits Blackburn knows what a hell hole it is. Labour are quite happy to see this mass immigration continue,as long as it helps Labour win votes. UKIP may not be the ultimate answer,and many would favour a harder line BNP approach,but the BNP are too extreme for some so UKIP seems to many to be a more moderate realistic stance on the EU and immigration. Socialism and Labour have had their time and chances,and i wish the two UKIP councillors all the best.[/p][/quote]Well said... spot on mate Randolf Litler !!!
  • Score: 19

1:59am Sat 24 May 14

BoltonLancs says...

A Campbell wrote:
Liamdog wrote:
About time, this country may finally be waking up to the loss of our heritage , culture, and way of life. Ukip are the only party standing up for the average uk citizen.
"Liamdog", you say UKIP are the only party standing up for the average uk citizen?

Are you aware of any of UKIP's domestic policies? Like 90% of the idiots who voted UKIP I guess you are not.
Are you aware of UKIP's policies A Campbell??? I very much doubt you do. But feel free to submit your awareness....
[quote][p][bold]A Campbell[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Liamdog[/bold] wrote: About time, this country may finally be waking up to the loss of our heritage , culture, and way of life. Ukip are the only party standing up for the average uk citizen.[/p][/quote]"Liamdog", you say UKIP are the only party standing up for the average uk citizen? Are you aware of any of UKIP's domestic policies? Like 90% of the idiots who voted UKIP I guess you are not.[/p][/quote]Are you aware of UKIP's policies A Campbell??? I very much doubt you do. But feel free to submit your awareness.... BoltonLancs
  • Score: 7

2:37am Sat 24 May 14

BoltonLancs says...

Randolf Litler !!! wrote:
OriginalAngryDad wrote:
zoomzam wrote:
Sadly these racists have started encroaching into Bolton....and they think by closing doors they will help the working classes??? Clueless!
I take it that you referring to Bolton's Muslim population, because a more inherently racist bunch you will not find.....

Sadly, I fear it's too late, as they already hold considerable sway in local politics.

Try voting UKIP next time........you never know.........
I fully agree with your comment about "a more inherently racist bunch you will not find"

By the way all you non white racists, it's just a thought but how many white people are employed in every take-away on derby st-st helens road- dean road....Not a single one from over at least 30 take - aways.
How many whites are employed in all the other so called businesses around there too....NONE.
You all stick to your own kind and spend your money in asian shops and businesses therefor keeping the money in a continuous circle.
What a disgrace this country has become
Absolutely Randolf, except quite a lot of non white racists' money is actually OUR council tax money given away for fun by the likes of Morris and Peel in the form of the numerous grants and allowances and benefits and guaranteed mosque builds, which encourage a certain religious ethnic "minority" in Bolton to reciprocate their affection to Morris and Peel in obvious ways.......In other words Morris and Peel are typical Labour corruption. Our
wishes were almost answered when Peel came so so close to losing his council seat, next time he will for sure :)
[quote][p][bold]Randolf Litler !!![/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]OriginalAngryDad[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]zoomzam[/bold] wrote: Sadly these racists have started encroaching into Bolton....and they think by closing doors they will help the working classes??? Clueless![/p][/quote]I take it that you referring to Bolton's Muslim population, because a more inherently racist bunch you will not find..... Sadly, I fear it's too late, as they already hold considerable sway in local politics. Try voting UKIP next time........you never know.........[/p][/quote]I fully agree with your comment about "a more inherently racist bunch you will not find" By the way all you non white racists, it's just a thought but how many white people are employed in every take-away on derby st-st helens road- dean road....Not a single one from over at least 30 take - aways. How many whites are employed in all the other so called businesses around there too....NONE. You all stick to your own kind and spend your money in asian shops and businesses therefor keeping the money in a continuous circle. What a disgrace this country has become[/p][/quote]Absolutely Randolf, except quite a lot of non white racists' money is actually OUR council tax money given away for fun by the likes of Morris and Peel in the form of the numerous grants and allowances and benefits and guaranteed mosque builds, which encourage a certain religious ethnic "minority" in Bolton to reciprocate their affection to Morris and Peel in obvious ways.......In other words Morris and Peel are typical Labour corruption. Our wishes were almost answered when Peel came so so close to losing his council seat, next time he will for sure :) BoltonLancs
  • Score: 22

2:49am Sat 24 May 14

BoltonLancs says...

hazy2k wrote:
Congratulations, you've voted in: scrapping paid maternity leave, raising taxes for the poorest 88% of Brits, scrapping paid holidays, speeding up privitisation of the nhs, cancelling all planned house building & cutting education spending to fund 3 aircraft carriers. Oh , not to mention describing rape as "not such a terrible ordeal". Maybe before voting you should've read their policies. Boltons problems aren't caused by Muslims & immigrants, nor are they going to be fixed by UKIP.
haz2k, who is your source regarding UKIPpolicy??? Why do you embarrass yourself by quoting Tories? Why are you so thick??
[quote][p][bold]hazy2k[/bold] wrote: Congratulations, you've voted in: scrapping paid maternity leave, raising taxes for the poorest 88% of Brits, scrapping paid holidays, speeding up privitisation of the nhs, cancelling all planned house building & cutting education spending to fund 3 aircraft carriers. Oh , not to mention describing rape as "not such a terrible ordeal". Maybe before voting you should've read their policies. Boltons problems aren't caused by Muslims & immigrants, nor are they going to be fixed by UKIP.[/p][/quote]haz2k, who is your source regarding UKIPpolicy??? Why do you embarrass yourself by quoting Tories? Why are you so thick?? BoltonLancs
  • Score: 10

7:28am Sat 24 May 14

NHLUFC says...

Sunday, 18 May 2014

Fascism: I sometimes fear...
"I sometimes fear that
people think that fascism arrives in fancy dress
worn by grotesques and monsters
as played out in endless re-runs of the Nazis.

Fascism arrives as your friend.
It will restore your honour,
make you feel proud,
protect your house,
give you a job,
clean up the neighbourhood,
remind you of how great you once were,
clear out the venal and the corrupt,
remove anything you feel is unlike you...

It doesn't walk in saying,
"Our programme means militias, mass imprisonments, transportations, war and persecution."
Michael Rosen 2014
Sunday, 18 May 2014 Fascism: I sometimes fear... "I sometimes fear that people think that fascism arrives in fancy dress worn by grotesques and monsters as played out in endless re-runs of the Nazis. Fascism arrives as your friend. It will restore your honour, make you feel proud, protect your house, give you a job, clean up the neighbourhood, remind you of how great you once were, clear out the venal and the corrupt, remove anything you feel is unlike you... It doesn't walk in saying, "Our programme means militias, mass imprisonments, transportations, war and persecution." Michael Rosen 2014 NHLUFC
  • Score: 10

8:23am Sat 24 May 14

Oldhampal says...

People are people and are very selfish by nature, this country was very attractive to people from abroad, they saw it as an opportunity to get something better for no contribution, to be allowed to practice their own discrimination against their women folk, to receive free medical care etc etc. Our politicians have allowed this to happen, they need to be talking about how to stop this takeover before we become a country no different to many third world countries . We as a nation have been exploited by our own for hundreds of years, Britain was the richest country in the world , but at the same time treated it's working class and poor with contempt, we then met in our local pubs and inns and started a revolution, we got the vote for women , we moved towards equality, then we got the Labour Party to try and pamper to the middle class for their vote, we then sacked our unions, we then divided our communities ,Scargill with his best friend Thatcher destroyed the only union that could have saved us, we then filled the country with people who would work for peanuts.we all then got angry and voted in UKIP right wingers possible dictator minded people who will if allowed create devisions within our broken country. Why did our fellow countrymen and women fight against Adolf Hitler? Was this to allow back door entry to destroy our culture?
People are people and are very selfish by nature, this country was very attractive to people from abroad, they saw it as an opportunity to get something better for no contribution, to be allowed to practice their own discrimination against their women folk, to receive free medical care etc etc. Our politicians have allowed this to happen, they need to be talking about how to stop this takeover before we become a country no different to many third world countries . We as a nation have been exploited by our own for hundreds of years, Britain was the richest country in the world , but at the same time treated it's working class and poor with contempt, we then met in our local pubs and inns and started a revolution, we got the vote for women , we moved towards equality, then we got the Labour Party to try and pamper to the middle class for their vote, we then sacked our unions, we then divided our communities ,Scargill with his best friend Thatcher destroyed the only union that could have saved us, we then filled the country with people who would work for peanuts.we all then got angry and voted in UKIP right wingers possible dictator minded people who will if allowed create devisions within our broken country. Why did our fellow countrymen and women fight against Adolf Hitler? Was this to allow back door entry to destroy our culture? Oldhampal
  • Score: 10

8:42am Sat 24 May 14

Oldhampal says...

Some jobs and actions for local Councillors to sort.
Scrap civic waste of money projects,
Treat us all the same
Stop positive discrimination
Clean all the streets to the same standard as Town Centre and Heaton
Have local elections every 4 years to save money,
Stop free parking for elected members
Make sure our military people are looked after when they come back into civvy street
Don't allow any shopkeepers to block our pavements
Reduce pollution stop buses and ice cream vans from parking up pumping out toxic fumes at child height
Reduce the number of Councillors down to 20 from 60
Some jobs and actions for local Councillors to sort. Scrap civic waste of money projects, Treat us all the same Stop positive discrimination Clean all the streets to the same standard as Town Centre and Heaton Have local elections every 4 years to save money, Stop free parking for elected members Make sure our military people are looked after when they come back into civvy street Don't allow any shopkeepers to block our pavements Reduce pollution stop buses and ice cream vans from parking up pumping out toxic fumes at child height Reduce the number of Councillors down to 20 from 60 Oldhampal
  • Score: 6

9:17am Sat 24 May 14

dystop says...

"Grandfather-of-17 and retired musician Mr Richardson, aged 68, said he and Ms Parkinson were committed to improving the whole of Bolton for its residents — and using their new-found positions to launch UKIP’s bid for a parliamentary seat in Bolton in 2015."

Mr Richardson's campaign made the point of "not being anything to do with national politics". Now he's using the new-found positions to launch a bid for a seat in national politics? That was a fast turn-around.
"Grandfather-of-17 and retired musician Mr Richardson, aged 68, said he and Ms Parkinson were committed to improving the whole of Bolton for its residents — and using their new-found positions to launch UKIP’s bid for a parliamentary seat in Bolton in 2015." Mr Richardson's campaign made the point of "not being anything to do with national politics". Now he's using the new-found positions to launch a bid for a seat in national politics? That was a fast turn-around. dystop
  • Score: 6

9:18am Sat 24 May 14

dystop says...

Liamdog wrote:
About time, this country may finally be waking up to the loss of our heritage , culture, and way of life. Ukip are the only party standing up for the average uk citizen.
With a flat rate tax so the poor and the rich pay the same amount? Charges to see the GP? Are you kidding me, did you actually read their policies before voting?
[quote][p][bold]Liamdog[/bold] wrote: About time, this country may finally be waking up to the loss of our heritage , culture, and way of life. Ukip are the only party standing up for the average uk citizen.[/p][/quote]With a flat rate tax so the poor and the rich pay the same amount? Charges to see the GP? Are you kidding me, did you actually read their policies before voting? dystop
  • Score: -6

9:22am Sat 24 May 14

dystop says...

markthementalist wrote:
I live in the Halliwell area and voted at my local polling station. I voted UKIP as rampant immigration is sadly bringing down my area. In the station to collect my sheet I was with 2 white people and 22 Indian/Pakistani's. My vote was and wasn't wasted as I used my electoral voice but I knew my vote would not influence anything. When will ALL the people in my area vote?
Laziness is not as rampant as immigration I am afraid.
You say "bringing down your area" like their very presence is causing problems. Are they actively committing many, many crimes? Because otherwise you're saying your area is falling apart for racist reasons.

Even if crime is high in your area, why do you need to mention the fact that they're Indian/Pakistani? Does that have any bearing on someone's likelihood to commit crime? No, it doesn't. So whatever way you look at it, you're being racist.
[quote][p][bold]markthementalist[/bold] wrote: I live in the Halliwell area and voted at my local polling station. I voted UKIP as rampant immigration is sadly bringing down my area. In the station to collect my sheet I was with 2 white people and 22 Indian/Pakistani's. My vote was and wasn't wasted as I used my electoral voice but I knew my vote would not influence anything. When will ALL the people in my area vote? Laziness is not as rampant as immigration I am afraid.[/p][/quote]You say "bringing down your area" like their very presence is causing problems. Are they actively committing many, many crimes? Because otherwise you're saying your area is falling apart for racist reasons. Even if crime is high in your area, why do you need to mention the fact that they're Indian/Pakistani? Does that have any bearing on someone's likelihood to commit crime? No, it doesn't. So whatever way you look at it, you're being racist. dystop
  • Score: -7

9:27am Sat 24 May 14

dystop says...

BibbleBobble wrote:
“We want to work towards increasing the types of shops that are in the town centre, beyond pawn and charity shops."

Very well said. Our once beautiful town centre is a mere shadow of its former glory. But do you know it's taken the Labour run Council a long time and required lot of effort to take it to such depths?
The town centre reflects the national economic crisis, not local policy. Investment has waned because of our national crippling debt. But shutting ourselves off from the EU limits the tree movement of trade and capital, which would make our economic situation worse.

UKIP constantly cite the "£55m a day to the EU" and "too much being spent on foreign aid". But those are drops in the ocean if you look at the big picture. Pensions alone is about £72 BILLION a year.
[quote][p][bold]BibbleBobble[/bold] wrote: “We want to work towards increasing the types of shops that are in the town centre, beyond pawn and charity shops." Very well said. Our once beautiful town centre is a mere shadow of its former glory. But do you know it's taken the Labour run Council a long time and required lot of effort to take it to such depths?[/p][/quote]The town centre reflects the national economic crisis, not local policy. Investment has waned because of our national crippling debt. But shutting ourselves off from the EU limits the tree movement of trade and capital, which would make our economic situation worse. UKIP constantly cite the "£55m a day to the EU" and "too much being spent on foreign aid". But those are drops in the ocean if you look at the big picture. Pensions alone is about £72 BILLION a year. dystop
  • Score: -9

9:29am Sat 24 May 14

dystop says...

OriginalAngryDad wrote:
zoomzam wrote:
Sadly these racists have started encroaching into Bolton....and they think by closing doors they will help the working classes??? Clueless!
I take it that you referring to Bolton's Muslim population, because a more inherently racist bunch you will not find.....

Sadly, I fear it's too late, as they already hold considerable sway in local politics.

Try voting UKIP next time........you never know.........
Muslim isn't a race.

And what evidence do you have for the group you're talking about being racist? I'm asking because you haven't provided any.
[quote][p][bold]OriginalAngryDad[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]zoomzam[/bold] wrote: Sadly these racists have started encroaching into Bolton....and they think by closing doors they will help the working classes??? Clueless![/p][/quote]I take it that you referring to Bolton's Muslim population, because a more inherently racist bunch you will not find..... Sadly, I fear it's too late, as they already hold considerable sway in local politics. Try voting UKIP next time........you never know.........[/p][/quote]Muslim isn't a race. And what evidence do you have for the group you're talking about being racist? I'm asking because you haven't provided any. dystop
  • Score: -6

9:31am Sat 24 May 14

dystop says...

Puffin-Billy wrote:
http://www.hopenotha

te.org.uk/subscribe/


....................

....................

....................

...............
This is what soldiers in 1914 died for.
This is what Bolton UKIP Cllr Parkinson admires.
This is what Bolton UKIP supporters admire.

....................

.........
A far right group has said it will step up security for Ukip leader Nigel Farage’s visit to Edinburgh tonight by deploying armoured vehicles and ex-military personnel to protect him.
Britain First, which is fielding its own candidates in the European elections, said it was not prepared to allow “fellow patriots” to be “bullied off our streets”.
http://www.edinburgh

news.scotsman.com/ne

ws/nigel-farage-face

s-barrage-of-edinbur

gh-protest-1-3404499


.................
A gang of teenagers terrorised a town's Muslim community, attacking two elderly men and an eight-year-old boy, a court heard.
http://www.expressan

dstar.com/news/2014/

04/30/teenagers-terr

orised-muslim-commun

ity-in-town/
....................

..........
Strip public of the vote says Ukip candidate
http://www.politics.

co.uk/news/2014/05/1

3/strip-public-of-th

e-vote-says-ukip-can

didate
....................

..........
*“We must pray for the gay community that they will see that they are indeed prisoners who need freedom.”
http://www.basingsto

kegazette.co.uk/news

/11230101._/?
....................

............
*You’re one of us, Dutch xenophobe Geert Wilders tells Nigel Farage
http://www.hopenotha

te.org.uk/news/home/

article/3211/yoursqu

ore-one-of-us-dutch-

xenophobe-geert-wild

ers-tells-nigel-fara

ge
....................

....................

..........
*"Any normal and fair-minded person would have a perfect right to be concerned if a group of Romanian people suddenly moved in next door."
http://www.bbc.co.uk

/news/uk-27459923
....................

...........
*Enid Lindsay, who is standing in Fazakerley , called voters “idiots”, while Clubmoor’s Paul Forrest claimed “racism is a natural outcome of evolution” and said the Catholic church is “far more dangerous” than the Ku Klux Klan (KKK).
....................

...................
Meanwhile John Halvorsen, a candidate in Everton , lists the Liverpool division of the far-right English Defence League among his “likes” on Facebook. He is also a member of an online group called “Was Enoch Powell Right?”.
http://www.liverpool

echo.co.uk/news/live

rpool-news/wannabe-l

iverpool-ukip-counci

llor-wants-7134800
....................

..........

Ukip chairwoman Janice Atkinson who called for protesters who ‘hurl abuse’ to be arrested caught swearing at anti-racism activists
Janice Atkinson, who is the party’s South East chair and described herself as Nigel Farage’s “number two”, was pictured raising her middle finger at members of the People’s Assembly in Ashford, Kent.
http://www.independe

nt.co.uk/news/uk/pol

itics/ukip-chairwoma

n-janice-atkinson-wh

o-called-for-protest

ers-who-hurl-abuse-t

o-be-arrested-Accord

ing to the protesters, former Tory candidate Ms Atkinson made “personal comments about body size”, and said: “I don't care where you f***ing post this, just f**k off!”caught-sweari

ng-at-antiracism-act

ivists-9392147.html
....................

......
Gerard Batten alongside far-right Dutch politician Geert Wilders.
http://www.politics.

co.uk/news/2014/05/1

6/ukip-mep-threatens

-to-prosecute-anti-r

acism-group
....................

..
Heino Vockrodt, who is standing for the Dudden Hill seat on May 22, accused Muslims of grooming sex slaves, compared a Willesden road to war torn Helmand Province and claimed Islam was an ideology not a religion.
http://www.kilburnti

mes.co.uk/news/race_

row_erupts_after_bre

nt_ukip_candidate_sl

ates_muslims_in_rant

ing_email_1_3600791?

usurv=skip
....................

.............
Dutch populist Geert Wilders said Wednesday he still hopes to bring Britain's anti-EU leader Nigel Farage into an alliance with France's Marine Le Pen despite her party's perceived anti-Semitism.
http://www.globalpos

t.com/dispatch/news/

afp/140514/dutch-pop

ulist-still-hopes-fa

rage-le-pen-alliance


....................

.....
A British Asian leader of Ukip’s youth wing has quit the party, branding it “racist” and “terrifying”.

Sanya-Jeet Thandi, who had been introduced at Ukip’s party conference as a future leader, said the party has abandoned its core supporters and now appealed to the “stupidity of ignorant anti-immigrant voters for electoral gain”.
http://www.hopenotha

te.org.uk/news/home/

article/3192/british

-asian-ukip-youth-le

ader-quits-racist-an

d-terrifying-ukip
..................
Ukip faces a “cash-for-Euro-sea

ts” scandal after forcing MEPs to donate large sums and threatening to bar those who refused from standing again, its former deputy leader says.
http://www.thetimes.

co.uk/tto/news/polit

ics/article4089092.e

ce?CMP=OTH-gnws-stan

dard-2014_05_13
This is a perfect example of cherry picking (with the intention of misleading people). Now go and find all the examples of white people committing crimes and post those.
[quote][p][bold]Puffin-Billy[/bold] wrote: http://www.hopenotha te.org.uk/subscribe/ .................... .................... .................... ............... This is what soldiers in 1914 died for. This is what Bolton UKIP Cllr Parkinson admires. This is what Bolton UKIP supporters admire. .................... ......... A far right group has said it will step up security for Ukip leader Nigel Farage’s visit to Edinburgh tonight by deploying armoured vehicles and ex-military personnel to protect him. Britain First, which is fielding its own candidates in the European elections, said it was not prepared to allow “fellow patriots” to be “bullied off our streets”. http://www.edinburgh news.scotsman.com/ne ws/nigel-farage-face s-barrage-of-edinbur gh-protest-1-3404499 ................. A gang of teenagers terrorised a town's Muslim community, attacking two elderly men and an eight-year-old boy, a court heard. http://www.expressan dstar.com/news/2014/ 04/30/teenagers-terr orised-muslim-commun ity-in-town/ .................... .......... Strip public of the vote says Ukip candidate http://www.politics. co.uk/news/2014/05/1 3/strip-public-of-th e-vote-says-ukip-can didate .................... .......... *“We must pray for the gay community that they will see that they are indeed prisoners who need freedom.” http://www.basingsto kegazette.co.uk/news /11230101._/? .................... ............ *You’re one of us, Dutch xenophobe Geert Wilders tells Nigel Farage http://www.hopenotha te.org.uk/news/home/ article/3211/yoursqu ore-one-of-us-dutch- xenophobe-geert-wild ers-tells-nigel-fara ge .................... .................... .......... *"Any normal and fair-minded person would have a perfect right to be concerned if a group of Romanian people suddenly moved in next door." http://www.bbc.co.uk /news/uk-27459923 .................... ........... *Enid Lindsay, who is standing in Fazakerley , called voters “idiots”, while Clubmoor’s Paul Forrest claimed “racism is a natural outcome of evolution” and said the Catholic church is “far more dangerous” than the Ku Klux Klan (KKK). .................... ................... Meanwhile John Halvorsen, a candidate in Everton , lists the Liverpool division of the far-right English Defence League among his “likes” on Facebook. He is also a member of an online group called “Was Enoch Powell Right?”. http://www.liverpool echo.co.uk/news/live rpool-news/wannabe-l iverpool-ukip-counci llor-wants-7134800 .................... .......... Ukip chairwoman Janice Atkinson who called for protesters who ‘hurl abuse’ to be arrested caught swearing at anti-racism activists Janice Atkinson, who is the party’s South East chair and described herself as Nigel Farage’s “number two”, was pictured raising her middle finger at members of the People’s Assembly in Ashford, Kent. http://www.independe nt.co.uk/news/uk/pol itics/ukip-chairwoma n-janice-atkinson-wh o-called-for-protest ers-who-hurl-abuse-t o-be-arrested-Accord ing to the protesters, former Tory candidate Ms Atkinson made “personal comments about [Ms Pizzey’s] body size”, and said: “I don't care where you f***ing post this, just f**k off!”caught-sweari ng-at-antiracism-act ivists-9392147.html .................... ...... Gerard Batten alongside far-right Dutch politician Geert Wilders. http://www.politics. co.uk/news/2014/05/1 6/ukip-mep-threatens -to-prosecute-anti-r acism-group .................... .. Heino Vockrodt, who is standing for the Dudden Hill seat on May 22, accused Muslims of grooming sex slaves, compared a Willesden road to war torn Helmand Province and claimed Islam was an ideology not a religion. http://www.kilburnti mes.co.uk/news/race_ row_erupts_after_bre nt_ukip_candidate_sl ates_muslims_in_rant ing_email_1_3600791? usurv=skip .................... ............. Dutch populist Geert Wilders said Wednesday he still hopes to bring Britain's anti-EU leader Nigel Farage into an alliance with France's Marine Le Pen despite her party's perceived anti-Semitism. http://www.globalpos t.com/dispatch/news/ afp/140514/dutch-pop ulist-still-hopes-fa rage-le-pen-alliance .................... ..... A British Asian leader of Ukip’s youth wing has quit the party, branding it “racist” and “terrifying”. Sanya-Jeet Thandi, who had been introduced at Ukip’s party conference as a future leader, said the party has abandoned its core supporters and now appealed to the “stupidity of ignorant anti-immigrant voters for electoral gain”. http://www.hopenotha te.org.uk/news/home/ article/3192/british -asian-ukip-youth-le ader-quits-racist-an d-terrifying-ukip .................. Ukip faces a “cash-for-Euro-sea ts” scandal after forcing MEPs to donate large sums and threatening to bar those who refused from standing again, its former deputy leader says. http://www.thetimes. co.uk/tto/news/polit ics/article4089092.e ce?CMP=OTH-gnws-stan dard-2014_05_13[/p][/quote]This is a perfect example of cherry picking (with the intention of misleading people). Now go and find all the examples of white people committing crimes and post those. dystop
  • Score: -9

9:39am Sat 24 May 14

dystop says...

Randolf Litler !!! wrote:
Jim271 and markthementalist

Bloody well said and truthful, this country is a nothing but a s h i t e h o l e now with uncontrolled immigration over the last 40 years and unbelievably it's still going on.
What will it be like in bolton in 5, 10, 20, years, i pity our future generations.it's
DISGRACEFUL.
Firstly, we don't have uncontrolled immigration. I challenge you to ask 10,000 people to just fly over to Heathrow and cross into the border unchallenged. That doesn't happen, meaning immigration isn't "uncontrolled".

Secondly, how has the country become bad? You didn't mention HOW, in what way it's bad.

Third, what is it that immigrants are doing that are causing it? You didn't mention that either. Unless you're just being racist.

If you want to blame someone, you can blame the people who actually have power - the government's actions in lending sub-prime and bailing out the banks, triggering off the national and contributing to the global financial crisis. They actually had an effect. Think before you type.
[quote][p][bold]Randolf Litler !!![/bold] wrote: Jim271 and markthementalist Bloody well said and truthful, this country is a nothing but a s h i t e h o l e now with uncontrolled immigration over the last 40 years and unbelievably it's still going on. What will it be like in bolton in 5, 10, 20, years, i pity our future generations.it's DISGRACEFUL.[/p][/quote]Firstly, we don't have uncontrolled immigration. I challenge you to ask 10,000 people to just fly over to Heathrow and cross into the border unchallenged. That doesn't happen, meaning immigration isn't "uncontrolled". Secondly, how has the country become bad? You didn't mention HOW, in what way it's bad. Third, what is it that immigrants are doing that are causing it? You didn't mention that either. Unless you're just being racist. If you want to blame someone, you can blame the people who actually have power - the government's actions in lending sub-prime and bailing out the banks, triggering off the national and contributing to the global financial crisis. They actually had an effect. Think before you type. dystop
  • Score: -7

9:43am Sat 24 May 14

dystop says...

Liamdog wrote:
A Campbell wrote:
Liamdog wrote:
About time, this country may finally be waking up to the loss of our heritage , culture, and way of life. Ukip are the only party standing up for the average uk citizen.
"Liamdog", you say UKIP are the only party standing up for the average uk citizen?

Are you aware of any of UKIP's domestic policies? Like 90% of the idiots who voted UKIP I guess you are not.
Put your vegan meal for one back in the oven a while , set aside your political correctness and airy fairy thoughts and. Take a walk up Derby st, Deane rd, Halliwell rd and tell me the main stream parties have been good for our town and country !
Yes, a progressive attitude coming from someone must mean they're vegan. What's that word when you judge someone without knowing the facts again? OH yeah, prejudice.

And "tell me the main stream parties have been good for our town and country"? Well no, they've not. But UKIP's policies are markedly worse. They're racist, homophobic, xenophobic, reactionary, thatcherite bigots who rely on votes from people's hysterical fears and hope they don't look at their policies in too much depth. (Seriously, you think another poll tax is gonna be good for Bolton?).
[quote][p][bold]Liamdog[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]A Campbell[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Liamdog[/bold] wrote: About time, this country may finally be waking up to the loss of our heritage , culture, and way of life. Ukip are the only party standing up for the average uk citizen.[/p][/quote]"Liamdog", you say UKIP are the only party standing up for the average uk citizen? Are you aware of any of UKIP's domestic policies? Like 90% of the idiots who voted UKIP I guess you are not.[/p][/quote]Put your vegan meal for one back in the oven a while , set aside your political correctness and airy fairy thoughts and. Take a walk up Derby st, Deane rd, Halliwell rd and tell me the main stream parties have been good for our town and country ![/p][/quote]Yes, a progressive attitude coming from someone must mean they're vegan. What's that word when you judge someone without knowing the facts again? OH yeah, prejudice. And "tell me the main stream parties have been good for our town and country"? Well no, they've not. But UKIP's policies are markedly worse. They're racist, homophobic, xenophobic, reactionary, thatcherite bigots who rely on votes from people's hysterical fears and hope they don't look at their policies in too much depth. (Seriously, you think another poll tax is gonna be good for Bolton?). dystop
  • Score: -7

9:46am Sat 24 May 14

dystop says...

BoltonLancs wrote:
Randolf Litler !!! wrote:
OriginalAngryDad wrote:
zoomzam wrote:
Sadly these racists have started encroaching into Bolton....and they think by closing doors they will help the working classes??? Clueless!
I take it that you referring to Bolton's Muslim population, because a more inherently racist bunch you will not find.....

Sadly, I fear it's too late, as they already hold considerable sway in local politics.

Try voting UKIP next time........you never know.........
I fully agree with your comment about "a more inherently racist bunch you will not find"

By the way all you non white racists, it's just a thought but how many white people are employed in every take-away on derby st-st helens road- dean road....Not a single one from over at least 30 take - aways.
How many whites are employed in all the other so called businesses around there too....NONE.
You all stick to your own kind and spend your money in asian shops and businesses therefor keeping the money in a continuous circle.
What a disgrace this country has become
Absolutely Randolf, except quite a lot of non white racists' money is actually OUR council tax money given away for fun by the likes of Morris and Peel in the form of the numerous grants and allowances and benefits and guaranteed mosque builds, which encourage a certain religious ethnic "minority" in Bolton to reciprocate their affection to Morris and Peel in obvious ways.......In other words Morris and Peel are typical Labour corruption. Our
wishes were almost answered when Peel came so so close to losing his council seat, next time he will for sure :)
"except quite a lot of non white racists' money is actually OUR council tax money"

Everyone pays taxes. Even VAT is a tax, it's on pretty much every purchasable item. I don't know why you're separating yourself from non-white people who pay taxes. Unless it's another symptom of UKIP racism.
[quote][p][bold]BoltonLancs[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Randolf Litler !!![/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]OriginalAngryDad[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]zoomzam[/bold] wrote: Sadly these racists have started encroaching into Bolton....and they think by closing doors they will help the working classes??? Clueless![/p][/quote]I take it that you referring to Bolton's Muslim population, because a more inherently racist bunch you will not find..... Sadly, I fear it's too late, as they already hold considerable sway in local politics. Try voting UKIP next time........you never know.........[/p][/quote]I fully agree with your comment about "a more inherently racist bunch you will not find" By the way all you non white racists, it's just a thought but how many white people are employed in every take-away on derby st-st helens road- dean road....Not a single one from over at least 30 take - aways. How many whites are employed in all the other so called businesses around there too....NONE. You all stick to your own kind and spend your money in asian shops and businesses therefor keeping the money in a continuous circle. What a disgrace this country has become[/p][/quote]Absolutely Randolf, except quite a lot of non white racists' money is actually OUR council tax money given away for fun by the likes of Morris and Peel in the form of the numerous grants and allowances and benefits and guaranteed mosque builds, which encourage a certain religious ethnic "minority" in Bolton to reciprocate their affection to Morris and Peel in obvious ways.......In other words Morris and Peel are typical Labour corruption. Our wishes were almost answered when Peel came so so close to losing his council seat, next time he will for sure :)[/p][/quote]"except quite a lot of non white racists' money is actually OUR council tax money" Everyone pays taxes. Even VAT is a tax, it's on pretty much every purchasable item. I don't know why you're separating yourself from non-white people who pay taxes. Unless it's another symptom of UKIP racism. dystop
  • Score: -6

9:50am Sat 24 May 14

dystop says...

hazy2k wrote:
Congratulations, you've voted in: scrapping paid maternity leave, raising taxes for the poorest 88% of Brits, scrapping paid holidays, speeding up privitisation of the nhs, cancelling all planned house building & cutting education spending to fund 3 aircraft carriers. Oh , not to mention describing rape as "not such a terrible ordeal". Maybe before voting you should've read their policies. Boltons problems aren't caused by Muslims & immigrants, nor are they going to be fixed by UKIP.
I don't know why people voted you down on this. You stated the facts - those are the policies UKIP stated they're in favour of.

Also, let's not forget that UKIP want to oppose climate change efforts and instead arm our submarines with US nuclear missiles and double the defence budget. Because that's what we need, war, not preserving the hospitals, schools, protecting the climate and the most vulnerable people.
[quote][p][bold]hazy2k[/bold] wrote: Congratulations, you've voted in: scrapping paid maternity leave, raising taxes for the poorest 88% of Brits, scrapping paid holidays, speeding up privitisation of the nhs, cancelling all planned house building & cutting education spending to fund 3 aircraft carriers. Oh , not to mention describing rape as "not such a terrible ordeal". Maybe before voting you should've read their policies. Boltons problems aren't caused by Muslims & immigrants, nor are they going to be fixed by UKIP.[/p][/quote]I don't know why people voted you down on this. You stated the facts - those are the policies UKIP stated they're in favour of. Also, let's not forget that UKIP want to oppose climate change efforts and instead arm our submarines with US nuclear missiles and double the defence budget. Because that's what we need, war, not preserving the hospitals, schools, protecting the climate and the most vulnerable people. dystop
  • Score: 1

9:51am Sat 24 May 14

dystop says...

DENBO1948 wrote:
RACIST!! yes I voted UKIP in the local elections and shall do next year, as for being racist ha ha I have plenty of friends some are coloured some white or should I say honky, never have been a racist though..
"Coloured?"

You sound like you're speaking from a different century.
[quote][p][bold]DENBO1948[/bold] wrote: RACIST!! yes I voted UKIP in the local elections and shall do next year, as for being racist ha ha I have plenty of friends some are coloured some white or should I say honky, never have been a racist though..[/p][/quote]"Coloured?" You sound like you're speaking from a different century. dystop
  • Score: 2

9:55am Sat 24 May 14

Puffin-Billy says...

By voting for UKIP

you have voted for a party which, through its membership of the EFD officially supports:
Fascism, Racism, Homophobia, and Misogyny.

You have legitimised, and officially welcomed Fascism, Racism, Homophobia, and Misogyny into Bolton Town Hall.

You have given them respectability, and they are now officially sanctioned, free to stalk the streets of Bolton.

By voting for Fascism, Racism, Homophobia, and Misogyny, you have insulted the memory of the fallen of the First and Second World Wars.

.....From Wilfred Owen's Futility:
"Was it for this the clay grew tall?
—O what made fatuous sunbeams toil
To break earth’s sleep at all?"

.....Inscription on Bolton Cenotaph:
“Tell ye your children our brothers died to win a better World our part must be to strive for truth goodwill and peace that their sacrifice be not in vain” .
By voting for UKIP you have voted for a party which, through its membership of the EFD officially supports: Fascism, Racism, Homophobia, and Misogyny. You have legitimised, and officially welcomed Fascism, Racism, Homophobia, and Misogyny into Bolton Town Hall. You have given them respectability, and they are now officially sanctioned, free to stalk the streets of Bolton. By voting for Fascism, Racism, Homophobia, and Misogyny, you have insulted the memory of the fallen of the First and Second World Wars. .....From Wilfred Owen's Futility: "Was it for this the clay grew tall? —O what made fatuous sunbeams toil To break earth’s sleep at all?" .....Inscription on Bolton Cenotaph: “Tell ye your children our brothers died to win a better World our part must be to strive for truth goodwill and peace that their sacrifice be not in vain” . Puffin-Billy
  • Score: 1

9:56am Sat 24 May 14

Gore Seer says...

On BBC Last Night Two MPs One Labour, One Conservative, Claim That Their Parties Have Not Kicked UKIP Hard Enough, And Should Now Kick Harder To Keep Them Out Of Politics, So If I Was UKIP I Would Look Under Toilet Seats, Check Wardrobes, There Will Be A Journalist Lurking Every Were.
On BBC Last Night Two MPs One Labour, One Conservative, Claim That Their Parties Have Not Kicked UKIP Hard Enough, And Should Now Kick Harder To Keep Them Out Of Politics, So If I Was UKIP I Would Look Under Toilet Seats, Check Wardrobes, There Will Be A Journalist Lurking Every Were. Gore Seer
  • Score: 4

10:21am Sat 24 May 14

itsnotthatbad says...

Puffin-Billy wrote:
By voting for UKIP

you have voted for a party which, through its membership of the EFD officially supports:
Fascism, Racism, Homophobia, and Misogyny.

You have legitimised, and officially welcomed Fascism, Racism, Homophobia, and Misogyny into Bolton Town Hall.

You have given them respectability, and they are now officially sanctioned, free to stalk the streets of Bolton.

By voting for Fascism, Racism, Homophobia, and Misogyny, you have insulted the memory of the fallen of the First and Second World Wars.

.....From Wilfred Owen's Futility:
"Was it for this the clay grew tall?
—O what made fatuous sunbeams toil
To break earth’s sleep at all?"

.....Inscription on Bolton Cenotaph:
“Tell ye your children our brothers died to win a better World our part must be to strive for truth goodwill and peace that their sacrifice be not in vain” .
Hello again Mr.A this is why I voted UKIP. I would never dream of voting for them in the full on elections, but this piece of news here hits the nail right on the head and is exactly how I feel.

His policies fill me with dread. But this is what you get when a smug metropolitan elite treat the people with contempt

Nobody can say it hasn’t been coming.
Yet as the local election results filtered through yesterday morning, there was a palpable sense of shock inside Britain’s political establishment, which had spent weeks writing off Nigel Farage and his motley band of grassroots insurgents.
‘The Ukip fox,’ Mr Farage said delightedly yesterday, ‘is in the Westminster hen house.’
That is putting it mildly — not least since the results in the European elections, which will not be counted until tomorrow, are expected to be even better for Ukip.
To get a sense of how far Mr Farage’s party has come, consider this. In the 2010 General Election, Ukip won just 3 per cent of the vote.
It does not have a single MP, its last election manifesto was wildly incoherent and, with the exception of the ebullient Mr Farage, its representatives are utterly obscure.
Yet for the second consecutive year, Ukip has won around a fifth of the national vote.
Defying all the predictions, it has gained more than 100 council seats. In Essex, it denied the Tories victory in Basildon, Castle Point and Southend.
And in Rotherham, supposedly a working-class Labour bastion, its candidates averaged a whopping 47 per cent of the vote.
By any standards this represents a political earthquake.
Since the 1930s, British politics has essentially been a two-and-a-half-party system, with the Tories and Labour monopolising the dance floor and the Lib Dems, in their various forms, lurking half-heartedly on the fringes.
What is now clear is that those days are finished. Neither David Cameron nor Ed Miliband has the slightest hope of winning as much as 40 per cent of the vote at the next General Election.
And given Ukip’s performance over the past few years, it would be a brave man who would bet against them picking up at least 10 per cent of the vote — and maybe more — in May 2015.
The really extraordinary thing is that this has been the achievement of one man.

Who would have believed that the outspoken Nigel Farage, a privately-educated former City trader who has never won a Westminster seat, would inspire such enthusiasm among ordinary voters from the housing estates of Essex to the post-industrial towns of South Yorkshire?
‘When he walked on to the stage in Portsmouth,’ wrote one reporter in last week’s Spectator magazine, ‘the crowd rose for him with a fervour I’ve never witnessed at a mainstream party conference.’
There is, of course, an obvious explanation. What Mr Farage has tapped into is a widespread national discontent that cannot merely be dismissed — as some metropolitan commentators have tried to do — as racism or xenophobia.
Ukip was founded in 1993 as an obscure anti-federalist pressure group. For years it struggled to gain attention.
Mr Farage’s tactical genius was to turn it into a populist anti-Establishment party, articulating deep-seated public anxieties about the two great taboos of modern political debate: Europe and immigration.
In many corners of the media, as well as in Westminster itself, both of these issues are regarded as toxic. Yet by ignoring them, the politicians have simply handed them to Mr Farage.
In the few days before Thursday’s elections, most of the coverage hinged on immigration.

When an exhausted Mr Farage said he would not want Romanians to move in next door to him, many commentators declared that he had committed an unforgivable gaffe which would poison his national reputation and destroy his support overnight.
I was reminded, however, of an interview Margaret Thatcher gave during a by-election campaign in Ilford in 1978, when she remarked that people were frightened of being ‘swamped’ by immigrants.
Like Mr Farage, she was seen as having committed a dreadful error. However, the supposed gaffe struck a chord, and the Tories promptly romped to victory.
The truth is that the immigration issue has been simmering unhealthily away for at least 40 years. As early as the late-1960s, polls showed that among young and old alike, mass immigration was by far the most unpopular development of the decade.
Among Britain’s politicians, however, immigration has always been the ultimate taboo. When Enoch Powell spoke out in 1968, he was roundly condemned and thrown off the Tory front bench.
Yet, whatever you or I might think of Powell’s famous ‘Rivers of Blood’ speech (a line he never actually used), a Gallup poll at the time found that 74 per cent of people agreed with him, while only 15 per cent disagreed.

Then as now, in other words, there was a wide gulf between what people thought at Westminster and what people thought in the rest of the country.
Writing a few days after the speech, the Guardian’s star columnist Peter Jenkins dismissed arguments that Powell and his admirers were merely racist.
What motivated them, Jenkins wrote, was the feeling that ‘the politicians are conspiring against the people, that the country is led by men who have no idea about what interests or frightens the ordinary people in the back streets of Wolverhampton’.
That sounds pretty familiar to me. Some of Mr Farage’s supporters may, indeed, be racially prejudiced, and certainly one or two of his councillors have some jaw-dropping medieval opinions. But I think there is much more to it than the prejudices of a minority.
For decades, surveys have shown that millions of ordinary people dislike the European Union and are alarmed by the influx of so many newcomers, especially in working-class towns struggling to cope with the decline of industry and the rise of unemployment.
Contrary to what the sneering metropolitan commentators like to think, the vast majority of these people are not racists. What worries them is the evaporation of jobs which are going overseas, the stagnation of real wages, the shortage of decent housing, the overcrowding of primary schools and the rising pressure on hospital wards and A&E departments.
Britain’s political and media classes, however, have shown themselves almost entirely uninterested — and for depressingly obvious reasons.

Most British politicians inhabit a gilded bubble. They are often born into comfortable households, go to private schools (or elite comprehensives) and then spend three years at Oxford or Cambridge before becoming political researchers, special advisers and MPs.
Well-heeled politicians such as David Cameron, Ed Miliband and Nick Clegg, like their friends and allies in the liberal media, see only the benefits of European membership and the unfettered movement of labour. To them, immigration means cheaper au pairs, cleaners and builders.
Because they rarely see the world outside Westminster, except on flying visits to their constituencies, they have no sense of the anxiety in working-class communities and are quick to condemn anybody who violates their shared taboo.
One example tells a wider story. Last year, the former editor of Prospect magazine, David Goodhart, published a book (serialised in the Mail), arguing that immigration was undermining national solidarity and the welfare state, and should, therefore, be curtailed.
As the incarnation of liberal-minded intellectualism, Mr Goodhart was very obviously not a racist. Yet to many people in London’s political and literary elites, he had put himself beyond the pale.
Not only did his expected invitation to the Hay Literary Festival not materialise, but there were howls of protest when his book was shortlisted for the Orwell Prize for political writing. This will surely strike a chord with many Ukip supporters, who, for the past few weeks, have been dismissed as a gaggle of lunatics, losers and would-be Nazis.
Perhaps I should say, by the way, that I am very far from being a Ukip supporter and almost certainly never will be.
The party’s manifesto seems to me largely fantastical, and the thought of its representatives running our nation’s schools and hospitals fills me with dread.
Yet I was shocked by the sanctimonious, patronising coverage in much of the London media. Indeed, reading some columnists, as well as listening to most of our current MPs, it was hard to miss the stench of social and cultural snobbery.

As the maverick Left-wing writer John Harris remarked yesterday, there was ‘a collective outbreak of sneering, which started to transcend the party itself and blur into a generalised mockery of anyone minded to support it’.
On Twitter, a BBC News channel editor, Jasmine Lawrence, declared that Ukip appealed only to ‘white, middle-class, middle-aged men with sexist/racist views’.
And others were little better. Almost incredibly, one Evening Standard columnist, after insisting that Ukip was a ‘racist party’, declared that it was ‘left to Londoners to speak for the nation’.
The truth, of course, is that Londoners spend rather too much time speaking for the nation. That is part of the problem.
Too often our self-regarding political classes forget that in reality (as opposed to their Westminster bubble), most of us do not live in London and are sick of having to endure the condescending jibes of those who do.
As Ukip’s Cheltenham branch chairman, Christina Simmonds, remarked yesterday: ‘They patronise us and try to make out we don’t know what we’re talking about just because they don’t agree with us. But what we’re saying is making sense to good, ordinary people.’
So where do we go from here?
It seems certain that tomorrow night’s European results will bring more good news for Mr Farage, and it seems highly implausible that his support will melt away, like the snows in spring, in time for next year’s General Election.

For Ed Miliband, the elections have been a wretched embarrassment. As the Labour MP John Mann rightly remarked, the ‘pointy-heads’ at the top of his party seem to have no idea of the pressures facing their working-class voters, while Mr Miliband’s student-union socialism has conspicuously failed to arouse public enthusiasm.
For David Cameron, though, the Ukip challenge seems even more urgent. Ever since becoming Tory leader in 2005, the PM has been determined to dismiss and patronise Ukip’s supporters, even calling them ‘loonies, fruitcakes and closet racists’.
Far from reaching out to them, Mr Cameron has effectively pretended that Ukip’s supporters do not exist.
That strategy has comprehensively failed; indeed, it is Mr Cameron’s condescending, lord-of-the-manor approach that has driven so many working-class and lower-middle-class Tories into Nigel Farage’s embrace.
It now seems very plausible that Ukip will pick up at least 10 per cent of the vote at next year’s General Election. In many parts of Britain, especially Southern England, there will almost certainly be a comfortable centre-right majority.
But that majority will be divided. And unless there is a stunning collapse in Ukip’s vote, they will surely cost the Tories several seats, perhaps even dozens, next May — thereby putting Ed Miliband into Downing Street.
Mr Cameron has always resisted the idea of an electoral pact with Ukip. But I wonder if he is now rethinking his position.
The Tories, after all, have a long history of election-winning pacts. In the late-Victorian period they governed in alliance with Joseph Chamberlain’s Liberal Unionists; in 1918 they organised a slate with David Lloyd George’s Liberals; and in the 1930s they formed an alliance with Ramsay MacDonald’s renegade National Labour party and Sir John Simon’s National Liberals.
A pact with Ukip would not, therefore, be unprecedented. It would certainly be risky. But since Mr Cameron may well decide that it offers the only chance of retaining the keys to No 10, I would not be surprised to see him change his mind.
At the very least, Mr Cameron has to find a way of speaking to those parts of Britain — unsung, ordinary, provincial working-class and lower-middle-class towns up and down the country — that he has so far failed to reach.
If he fails, then this time next year he will be looking for a new job. That ought to focus his mind.
[quote][p][bold]Puffin-Billy[/bold] wrote: By voting for UKIP you have voted for a party which, through its membership of the EFD officially supports: Fascism, Racism, Homophobia, and Misogyny. You have legitimised, and officially welcomed Fascism, Racism, Homophobia, and Misogyny into Bolton Town Hall. You have given them respectability, and they are now officially sanctioned, free to stalk the streets of Bolton. By voting for Fascism, Racism, Homophobia, and Misogyny, you have insulted the memory of the fallen of the First and Second World Wars. .....From Wilfred Owen's Futility: "Was it for this the clay grew tall? —O what made fatuous sunbeams toil To break earth’s sleep at all?" .....Inscription on Bolton Cenotaph: “Tell ye your children our brothers died to win a better World our part must be to strive for truth goodwill and peace that their sacrifice be not in vain” .[/p][/quote]Hello again Mr.A this is why I voted UKIP. I would never dream of voting for them in the full on elections, but this piece of news here hits the nail right on the head and is exactly how I feel. His policies fill me with dread. But this is what you get when a smug metropolitan elite treat the people with contempt Nobody can say it hasn’t been coming. Yet as the local election results filtered through yesterday morning, there was a palpable sense of shock inside Britain’s political establishment, which had spent weeks writing off Nigel Farage and his motley band of grassroots insurgents. ‘The Ukip fox,’ Mr Farage said delightedly yesterday, ‘is in the Westminster hen house.’ That is putting it mildly — not least since the results in the European elections, which will not be counted until tomorrow, are expected to be even better for Ukip. To get a sense of how far Mr Farage’s party has come, consider this. In the 2010 General Election, Ukip won just 3 per cent of the vote. It does not have a single MP, its last election manifesto was wildly incoherent and, with the exception of the ebullient Mr Farage, its representatives are utterly obscure. Yet for the second consecutive year, Ukip has won around a fifth of the national vote. Defying all the predictions, it has gained more than 100 council seats. In Essex, it denied the Tories victory in Basildon, Castle Point and Southend. And in Rotherham, supposedly a working-class Labour bastion, its candidates averaged a whopping 47 per cent of the vote. By any standards this represents a political earthquake. Since the 1930s, British politics has essentially been a two-and-a-half-party system, with the Tories and Labour monopolising the dance floor and the Lib Dems, in their various forms, lurking half-heartedly on the fringes. What is now clear is that those days are finished. Neither David Cameron nor Ed Miliband has the slightest hope of winning as much as 40 per cent of the vote at the next General Election. And given Ukip’s performance over the past few years, it would be a brave man who would bet against them picking up at least 10 per cent of the vote — and maybe more — in May 2015. The really extraordinary thing is that this has been the achievement of one man. Who would have believed that the outspoken Nigel Farage, a privately-educated former City trader who has never won a Westminster seat, would inspire such enthusiasm among ordinary voters from the housing estates of Essex to the post-industrial towns of South Yorkshire? ‘When he walked on to the stage in Portsmouth,’ wrote one reporter in last week’s Spectator magazine, ‘the crowd rose for him with a fervour I’ve never witnessed at a mainstream party conference.’ There is, of course, an obvious explanation. What Mr Farage has tapped into is a widespread national discontent that cannot merely be dismissed — as some metropolitan commentators have tried to do — as racism or xenophobia. Ukip was founded in 1993 as an obscure anti-federalist pressure group. For years it struggled to gain attention. Mr Farage’s tactical genius was to turn it into a populist anti-Establishment party, articulating deep-seated public anxieties about the two great taboos of modern political debate: Europe and immigration. In many corners of the media, as well as in Westminster itself, both of these issues are regarded as toxic. Yet by ignoring them, the politicians have simply handed them to Mr Farage. In the few days before Thursday’s elections, most of the coverage hinged on immigration. When an exhausted Mr Farage said he would not want Romanians to move in next door to him, many commentators declared that he had committed an unforgivable gaffe which would poison his national reputation and destroy his support overnight. I was reminded, however, of an interview Margaret Thatcher gave during a by-election campaign in Ilford in 1978, when she remarked that people were frightened of being ‘swamped’ by immigrants. Like Mr Farage, she was seen as having committed a dreadful error. However, the supposed gaffe struck a chord, and the Tories promptly romped to victory. The truth is that the immigration issue has been simmering unhealthily away for at least 40 years. As early as the late-1960s, polls showed that among young and old alike, mass immigration was by far the most unpopular development of the decade. Among Britain’s politicians, however, immigration has always been the ultimate taboo. When Enoch Powell spoke out in 1968, he was roundly condemned and thrown off the Tory front bench. Yet, whatever you or I might think of Powell’s famous ‘Rivers of Blood’ speech (a line he never actually used), a Gallup poll at the time found that 74 per cent of people agreed with him, while only 15 per cent disagreed. Then as now, in other words, there was a wide gulf between what people thought at Westminster and what people thought in the rest of the country. Writing a few days after the speech, the Guardian’s star columnist Peter Jenkins dismissed arguments that Powell and his admirers were merely racist. What motivated them, Jenkins wrote, was the feeling that ‘the politicians are conspiring against the people, that the country is led by men who have no idea about what interests or frightens the ordinary people in the back streets of Wolverhampton’. That sounds pretty familiar to me. Some of Mr Farage’s supporters may, indeed, be racially prejudiced, and certainly one or two of his councillors have some jaw-dropping medieval opinions. But I think there is much more to it than the prejudices of a minority. For decades, surveys have shown that millions of ordinary people dislike the European Union and are alarmed by the influx of so many newcomers, especially in working-class towns struggling to cope with the decline of industry and the rise of unemployment. Contrary to what the sneering metropolitan commentators like to think, the vast majority of these people are not racists. What worries them is the evaporation of jobs which are going overseas, the stagnation of real wages, the shortage of decent housing, the overcrowding of primary schools and the rising pressure on hospital wards and A&E departments. Britain’s political and media classes, however, have shown themselves almost entirely uninterested — and for depressingly obvious reasons. Most British politicians inhabit a gilded bubble. They are often born into comfortable households, go to private schools (or elite comprehensives) and then spend three years at Oxford or Cambridge before becoming political researchers, special advisers and MPs. Well-heeled politicians such as David Cameron, Ed Miliband and Nick Clegg, like their friends and allies in the liberal media, see only the benefits of European membership and the unfettered movement of labour. To them, immigration means cheaper au pairs, cleaners and builders. Because they rarely see the world outside Westminster, except on flying visits to their constituencies, they have no sense of the anxiety in working-class communities and are quick to condemn anybody who violates their shared taboo. One example tells a wider story. Last year, the former editor of Prospect magazine, David Goodhart, published a book (serialised in the Mail), arguing that immigration was undermining national solidarity and the welfare state, and should, therefore, be curtailed. As the incarnation of liberal-minded intellectualism, Mr Goodhart was very obviously not a racist. Yet to many people in London’s political and literary elites, he had put himself beyond the pale. Not only did his expected invitation to the Hay Literary Festival not materialise, but there were howls of protest when his book was shortlisted for the Orwell Prize for political writing. This will surely strike a chord with many Ukip supporters, who, for the past few weeks, have been dismissed as a gaggle of lunatics, losers and would-be Nazis. Perhaps I should say, by the way, that I am very far from being a Ukip supporter and almost certainly never will be. The party’s manifesto seems to me largely fantastical, and the thought of its representatives running our nation’s schools and hospitals fills me with dread. Yet I was shocked by the sanctimonious, patronising coverage in much of the London media. Indeed, reading some columnists, as well as listening to most of our current MPs, it was hard to miss the stench of social and cultural snobbery. As the maverick Left-wing writer John Harris remarked yesterday, there was ‘a collective outbreak of sneering, which started to transcend the party itself and blur into a generalised mockery of anyone minded to support it’. On Twitter, a BBC News channel editor, Jasmine Lawrence, declared that Ukip appealed only to ‘white, middle-class, middle-aged men with sexist/racist views’. And others were little better. Almost incredibly, one Evening Standard columnist, after insisting that Ukip was a ‘racist party’, declared that it was ‘left to Londoners to speak for the nation’. The truth, of course, is that Londoners spend rather too much time speaking for the nation. That is part of the problem. Too often our self-regarding political classes forget that in reality (as opposed to their Westminster bubble), most of us do not live in London and are sick of having to endure the condescending jibes of those who do. As Ukip’s Cheltenham branch chairman, Christina Simmonds, remarked yesterday: ‘They patronise us and try to make out we don’t know what we’re talking about just because they don’t agree with us. But what we’re saying is making sense to good, ordinary people.’ So where do we go from here? It seems certain that tomorrow night’s European results will bring more good news for Mr Farage, and it seems highly implausible that his support will melt away, like the snows in spring, in time for next year’s General Election. For Ed Miliband, the elections have been a wretched embarrassment. As the Labour MP John Mann rightly remarked, the ‘pointy-heads’ at the top of his party seem to have no idea of the pressures facing their working-class voters, while Mr Miliband’s student-union socialism has conspicuously failed to arouse public enthusiasm. For David Cameron, though, the Ukip challenge seems even more urgent. Ever since becoming Tory leader in 2005, the PM has been determined to dismiss and patronise Ukip’s supporters, even calling them ‘loonies, fruitcakes and closet racists’. Far from reaching out to them, Mr Cameron has effectively pretended that Ukip’s supporters do not exist. That strategy has comprehensively failed; indeed, it is Mr Cameron’s condescending, lord-of-the-manor approach that has driven so many working-class and lower-middle-class Tories into Nigel Farage’s embrace. It now seems very plausible that Ukip will pick up at least 10 per cent of the vote at next year’s General Election. In many parts of Britain, especially Southern England, there will almost certainly be a comfortable centre-right majority. But that majority will be divided. And unless there is a stunning collapse in Ukip’s vote, they will surely cost the Tories several seats, perhaps even dozens, next May — thereby putting Ed Miliband into Downing Street. Mr Cameron has always resisted the idea of an electoral pact with Ukip. But I wonder if he is now rethinking his position. The Tories, after all, have a long history of election-winning pacts. In the late-Victorian period they governed in alliance with Joseph Chamberlain’s Liberal Unionists; in 1918 they organised a slate with David Lloyd George’s Liberals; and in the 1930s they formed an alliance with Ramsay MacDonald’s renegade National Labour party and Sir John Simon’s National Liberals. A pact with Ukip would not, therefore, be unprecedented. It would certainly be risky. But since Mr Cameron may well decide that it offers the only chance of retaining the keys to No 10, I would not be surprised to see him change his mind. At the very least, Mr Cameron has to find a way of speaking to those parts of Britain — unsung, ordinary, provincial working-class and lower-middle-class towns up and down the country — that he has so far failed to reach. If he fails, then this time next year he will be looking for a new job. That ought to focus his mind. itsnotthatbad
  • Score: 6

10:33am Sat 24 May 14

glad to haveleft says...

MasterOfPuppets wrote:
Really? REALLY!? You're not racist you have "coloured" friends? COLOURED!? What is this, 1952? Do you really think having a local UKIP council will be able to do anything about the EU and immigration? LOL! It's not going to change anything!
You don't like the term, "coloured"?
Perhaps you prefer "black"? Don't you know that these are just terms of convenience which change according to the fashions of the time.
Is the word "coloured"offensive, why?
Do you think the "n" word is acceptable when used by "black" people?
I suppose your definition of a bigot is, anyone who disagrees with you.
You should stop feeling so self-righteous and start to accept that white ( pejorative?)people have a right to their opinions, and that their choice of words is not as important as you like to think.
[quote][p][bold]MasterOfPuppets[/bold] wrote: Really? REALLY!? You're not racist you have "coloured" friends? COLOURED!? What is this, 1952? Do you really think having a local UKIP council will be able to do anything about the EU and immigration? LOL! It's not going to change anything![/p][/quote]You don't like the term, "coloured"? Perhaps you prefer "black"? Don't you know that these are just terms of convenience which change according to the fashions of the time. Is the word "coloured"offensive, why? Do you think the "n" word is acceptable when used by "black" people? I suppose your definition of a bigot is, anyone who disagrees with you. You should stop feeling so self-righteous and start to accept that white ( pejorative?)people have a right to their opinions, and that their choice of words is not as important as you like to think. glad to haveleft
  • Score: 3

10:36am Sat 24 May 14

glad to haveleft says...

itsnotthatbad wrote:
Puffin-Billy wrote:
By voting for UKIP

you have voted for a party which, through its membership of the EFD officially supports:
Fascism, Racism, Homophobia, and Misogyny.

You have legitimised, and officially welcomed Fascism, Racism, Homophobia, and Misogyny into Bolton Town Hall.

You have given them respectability, and they are now officially sanctioned, free to stalk the streets of Bolton.

By voting for Fascism, Racism, Homophobia, and Misogyny, you have insulted the memory of the fallen of the First and Second World Wars.

.....From Wilfred Owen's Futility:
"Was it for this the clay grew tall?
—O what made fatuous sunbeams toil
To break earth’s sleep at all?"

.....Inscription on Bolton Cenotaph:
“Tell ye your children our brothers died to win a better World our part must be to strive for truth goodwill and peace that their sacrifice be not in vain” .
Hello again Mr.A this is why I voted UKIP. I would never dream of voting for them in the full on elections, but this piece of news here hits the nail right on the head and is exactly how I feel.

His policies fill me with dread. But this is what you get when a smug metropolitan elite treat the people with contempt

Nobody can say it hasn’t been coming.
Yet as the local election results filtered through yesterday morning, there was a palpable sense of shock inside Britain’s political establishment, which had spent weeks writing off Nigel Farage and his motley band of grassroots insurgents.
‘The Ukip fox,’ Mr Farage said delightedly yesterday, ‘is in the Westminster hen house.’
That is putting it mildly — not least since the results in the European elections, which will not be counted until tomorrow, are expected to be even better for Ukip.
To get a sense of how far Mr Farage’s party has come, consider this. In the 2010 General Election, Ukip won just 3 per cent of the vote.
It does not have a single MP, its last election manifesto was wildly incoherent and, with the exception of the ebullient Mr Farage, its representatives are utterly obscure.
Yet for the second consecutive year, Ukip has won around a fifth of the national vote.
Defying all the predictions, it has gained more than 100 council seats. In Essex, it denied the Tories victory in Basildon, Castle Point and Southend.
And in Rotherham, supposedly a working-class Labour bastion, its candidates averaged a whopping 47 per cent of the vote.
By any standards this represents a political earthquake.
Since the 1930s, British politics has essentially been a two-and-a-half-party system, with the Tories and Labour monopolising the dance floor and the Lib Dems, in their various forms, lurking half-heartedly on the fringes.
What is now clear is that those days are finished. Neither David Cameron nor Ed Miliband has the slightest hope of winning as much as 40 per cent of the vote at the next General Election.
And given Ukip’s performance over the past few years, it would be a brave man who would bet against them picking up at least 10 per cent of the vote — and maybe more — in May 2015.
The really extraordinary thing is that this has been the achievement of one man.

Who would have believed that the outspoken Nigel Farage, a privately-educated former City trader who has never won a Westminster seat, would inspire such enthusiasm among ordinary voters from the housing estates of Essex to the post-industrial towns of South Yorkshire?
‘When he walked on to the stage in Portsmouth,’ wrote one reporter in last week’s Spectator magazine, ‘the crowd rose for him with a fervour I’ve never witnessed at a mainstream party conference.’
There is, of course, an obvious explanation. What Mr Farage has tapped into is a widespread national discontent that cannot merely be dismissed — as some metropolitan commentators have tried to do — as racism or xenophobia.
Ukip was founded in 1993 as an obscure anti-federalist pressure group. For years it struggled to gain attention.
Mr Farage’s tactical genius was to turn it into a populist anti-Establishment party, articulating deep-seated public anxieties about the two great taboos of modern political debate: Europe and immigration.
In many corners of the media, as well as in Westminster itself, both of these issues are regarded as toxic. Yet by ignoring them, the politicians have simply handed them to Mr Farage.
In the few days before Thursday’s elections, most of the coverage hinged on immigration.

When an exhausted Mr Farage said he would not want Romanians to move in next door to him, many commentators declared that he had committed an unforgivable gaffe which would poison his national reputation and destroy his support overnight.
I was reminded, however, of an interview Margaret Thatcher gave during a by-election campaign in Ilford in 1978, when she remarked that people were frightened of being ‘swamped’ by immigrants.
Like Mr Farage, she was seen as having committed a dreadful error. However, the supposed gaffe struck a chord, and the Tories promptly romped to victory.
The truth is that the immigration issue has been simmering unhealthily away for at least 40 years. As early as the late-1960s, polls showed that among young and old alike, mass immigration was by far the most unpopular development of the decade.
Among Britain’s politicians, however, immigration has always been the ultimate taboo. When Enoch Powell spoke out in 1968, he was roundly condemned and thrown off the Tory front bench.
Yet, whatever you or I might think of Powell’s famous ‘Rivers of Blood’ speech (a line he never actually used), a Gallup poll at the time found that 74 per cent of people agreed with him, while only 15 per cent disagreed.

Then as now, in other words, there was a wide gulf between what people thought at Westminster and what people thought in the rest of the country.
Writing a few days after the speech, the Guardian’s star columnist Peter Jenkins dismissed arguments that Powell and his admirers were merely racist.
What motivated them, Jenkins wrote, was the feeling that ‘the politicians are conspiring against the people, that the country is led by men who have no idea about what interests or frightens the ordinary people in the back streets of Wolverhampton’.
That sounds pretty familiar to me. Some of Mr Farage’s supporters may, indeed, be racially prejudiced, and certainly one or two of his councillors have some jaw-dropping medieval opinions. But I think there is much more to it than the prejudices of a minority.
For decades, surveys have shown that millions of ordinary people dislike the European Union and are alarmed by the influx of so many newcomers, especially in working-class towns struggling to cope with the decline of industry and the rise of unemployment.
Contrary to what the sneering metropolitan commentators like to think, the vast majority of these people are not racists. What worries them is the evaporation of jobs which are going overseas, the stagnation of real wages, the shortage of decent housing, the overcrowding of primary schools and the rising pressure on hospital wards and A&E departments.
Britain’s political and media classes, however, have shown themselves almost entirely uninterested — and for depressingly obvious reasons.

Most British politicians inhabit a gilded bubble. They are often born into comfortable households, go to private schools (or elite comprehensives) and then spend three years at Oxford or Cambridge before becoming political researchers, special advisers and MPs.
Well-heeled politicians such as David Cameron, Ed Miliband and Nick Clegg, like their friends and allies in the liberal media, see only the benefits of European membership and the unfettered movement of labour. To them, immigration means cheaper au pairs, cleaners and builders.
Because they rarely see the world outside Westminster, except on flying visits to their constituencies, they have no sense of the anxiety in working-class communities and are quick to condemn anybody who violates their shared taboo.
One example tells a wider story. Last year, the former editor of Prospect magazine, David Goodhart, published a book (serialised in the Mail), arguing that immigration was undermining national solidarity and the welfare state, and should, therefore, be curtailed.
As the incarnation of liberal-minded intellectualism, Mr Goodhart was very obviously not a racist. Yet to many people in London’s political and literary elites, he had put himself beyond the pale.
Not only did his expected invitation to the Hay Literary Festival not materialise, but there were howls of protest when his book was shortlisted for the Orwell Prize for political writing. This will surely strike a chord with many Ukip supporters, who, for the past few weeks, have been dismissed as a gaggle of lunatics, losers and would-be Nazis.
Perhaps I should say, by the way, that I am very far from being a Ukip supporter and almost certainly never will be.
The party’s manifesto seems to me largely fantastical, and the thought of its representatives running our nation’s schools and hospitals fills me with dread.
Yet I was shocked by the sanctimonious, patronising coverage in much of the London media. Indeed, reading some columnists, as well as listening to most of our current MPs, it was hard to miss the stench of social and cultural snobbery.

As the maverick Left-wing writer John Harris remarked yesterday, there was ‘a collective outbreak of sneering, which started to transcend the party itself and blur into a generalised mockery of anyone minded to support it’.
On Twitter, a BBC News channel editor, Jasmine Lawrence, declared that Ukip appealed only to ‘white, middle-class, middle-aged men with sexist/racist views’.
And others were little better. Almost incredibly, one Evening Standard columnist, after insisting that Ukip was a ‘racist party’, declared that it was ‘left to Londoners to speak for the nation’.
The truth, of course, is that Londoners spend rather too much time speaking for the nation. That is part of the problem.
Too often our self-regarding political classes forget that in reality (as opposed to their Westminster bubble), most of us do not live in London and are sick of having to endure the condescending jibes of those who do.
As Ukip’s Cheltenham branch chairman, Christina Simmonds, remarked yesterday: ‘They patronise us and try to make out we don’t know what we’re talking about just because they don’t agree with us. But what we’re saying is making sense to good, ordinary people.’
So where do we go from here?
It seems certain that tomorrow night’s European results will bring more good news for Mr Farage, and it seems highly implausible that his support will melt away, like the snows in spring, in time for next year’s General Election.

For Ed Miliband, the elections have been a wretched embarrassment. As the Labour MP John Mann rightly remarked, the ‘pointy-heads’ at the top of his party seem to have no idea of the pressures facing their working-class voters, while Mr Miliband’s student-union socialism has conspicuously failed to arouse public enthusiasm.
For David Cameron, though, the Ukip challenge seems even more urgent. Ever since becoming Tory leader in 2005, the PM has been determined to dismiss and patronise Ukip’s supporters, even calling them ‘loonies, fruitcakes and closet racists’.
Far from reaching out to them, Mr Cameron has effectively pretended that Ukip’s supporters do not exist.
That strategy has comprehensively failed; indeed, it is Mr Cameron’s condescending, lord-of-the-manor approach that has driven so many working-class and lower-middle-class Tories into Nigel Farage’s embrace.
It now seems very plausible that Ukip will pick up at least 10 per cent of the vote at next year’s General Election. In many parts of Britain, especially Southern England, there will almost certainly be a comfortable centre-right majority.
But that majority will be divided. And unless there is a stunning collapse in Ukip’s vote, they will surely cost the Tories several seats, perhaps even dozens, next May — thereby putting Ed Miliband into Downing Street.
Mr Cameron has always resisted the idea of an electoral pact with Ukip. But I wonder if he is now rethinking his position.
The Tories, after all, have a long history of election-winning pacts. In the late-Victorian period they governed in alliance with Joseph Chamberlain’s Liberal Unionists; in 1918 they organised a slate with David Lloyd George’s Liberals; and in the 1930s they formed an alliance with Ramsay MacDonald’s renegade National Labour party and Sir John Simon’s National Liberals.
A pact with Ukip would not, therefore, be unprecedented. It would certainly be risky. But since Mr Cameron may well decide that it offers the only chance of retaining the keys to No 10, I would not be surprised to see him change his mind.
At the very least, Mr Cameron has to find a way of speaking to those parts of Britain — unsung, ordinary, provincial working-class and lower-middle-class towns up and down the country — that he has so far failed to reach.
If he fails, then this time next year he will be looking for a new job. That ought to focus his mind.
I'm sorry, but you are so verbose that it would exhaust me to try to read all of your letter.
Could you re-write it as a synopsis.
[quote][p][bold]itsnotthatbad[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Puffin-Billy[/bold] wrote: By voting for UKIP you have voted for a party which, through its membership of the EFD officially supports: Fascism, Racism, Homophobia, and Misogyny. You have legitimised, and officially welcomed Fascism, Racism, Homophobia, and Misogyny into Bolton Town Hall. You have given them respectability, and they are now officially sanctioned, free to stalk the streets of Bolton. By voting for Fascism, Racism, Homophobia, and Misogyny, you have insulted the memory of the fallen of the First and Second World Wars. .....From Wilfred Owen's Futility: "Was it for this the clay grew tall? —O what made fatuous sunbeams toil To break earth’s sleep at all?" .....Inscription on Bolton Cenotaph: “Tell ye your children our brothers died to win a better World our part must be to strive for truth goodwill and peace that their sacrifice be not in vain” .[/p][/quote]Hello again Mr.A this is why I voted UKIP. I would never dream of voting for them in the full on elections, but this piece of news here hits the nail right on the head and is exactly how I feel. His policies fill me with dread. But this is what you get when a smug metropolitan elite treat the people with contempt Nobody can say it hasn’t been coming. Yet as the local election results filtered through yesterday morning, there was a palpable sense of shock inside Britain’s political establishment, which had spent weeks writing off Nigel Farage and his motley band of grassroots insurgents. ‘The Ukip fox,’ Mr Farage said delightedly yesterday, ‘is in the Westminster hen house.’ That is putting it mildly — not least since the results in the European elections, which will not be counted until tomorrow, are expected to be even better for Ukip. To get a sense of how far Mr Farage’s party has come, consider this. In the 2010 General Election, Ukip won just 3 per cent of the vote. It does not have a single MP, its last election manifesto was wildly incoherent and, with the exception of the ebullient Mr Farage, its representatives are utterly obscure. Yet for the second consecutive year, Ukip has won around a fifth of the national vote. Defying all the predictions, it has gained more than 100 council seats. In Essex, it denied the Tories victory in Basildon, Castle Point and Southend. And in Rotherham, supposedly a working-class Labour bastion, its candidates averaged a whopping 47 per cent of the vote. By any standards this represents a political earthquake. Since the 1930s, British politics has essentially been a two-and-a-half-party system, with the Tories and Labour monopolising the dance floor and the Lib Dems, in their various forms, lurking half-heartedly on the fringes. What is now clear is that those days are finished. Neither David Cameron nor Ed Miliband has the slightest hope of winning as much as 40 per cent of the vote at the next General Election. And given Ukip’s performance over the past few years, it would be a brave man who would bet against them picking up at least 10 per cent of the vote — and maybe more — in May 2015. The really extraordinary thing is that this has been the achievement of one man. Who would have believed that the outspoken Nigel Farage, a privately-educated former City trader who has never won a Westminster seat, would inspire such enthusiasm among ordinary voters from the housing estates of Essex to the post-industrial towns of South Yorkshire? ‘When he walked on to the stage in Portsmouth,’ wrote one reporter in last week’s Spectator magazine, ‘the crowd rose for him with a fervour I’ve never witnessed at a mainstream party conference.’ There is, of course, an obvious explanation. What Mr Farage has tapped into is a widespread national discontent that cannot merely be dismissed — as some metropolitan commentators have tried to do — as racism or xenophobia. Ukip was founded in 1993 as an obscure anti-federalist pressure group. For years it struggled to gain attention. Mr Farage’s tactical genius was to turn it into a populist anti-Establishment party, articulating deep-seated public anxieties about the two great taboos of modern political debate: Europe and immigration. In many corners of the media, as well as in Westminster itself, both of these issues are regarded as toxic. Yet by ignoring them, the politicians have simply handed them to Mr Farage. In the few days before Thursday’s elections, most of the coverage hinged on immigration. When an exhausted Mr Farage said he would not want Romanians to move in next door to him, many commentators declared that he had committed an unforgivable gaffe which would poison his national reputation and destroy his support overnight. I was reminded, however, of an interview Margaret Thatcher gave during a by-election campaign in Ilford in 1978, when she remarked that people were frightened of being ‘swamped’ by immigrants. Like Mr Farage, she was seen as having committed a dreadful error. However, the supposed gaffe struck a chord, and the Tories promptly romped to victory. The truth is that the immigration issue has been simmering unhealthily away for at least 40 years. As early as the late-1960s, polls showed that among young and old alike, mass immigration was by far the most unpopular development of the decade. Among Britain’s politicians, however, immigration has always been the ultimate taboo. When Enoch Powell spoke out in 1968, he was roundly condemned and thrown off the Tory front bench. Yet, whatever you or I might think of Powell’s famous ‘Rivers of Blood’ speech (a line he never actually used), a Gallup poll at the time found that 74 per cent of people agreed with him, while only 15 per cent disagreed. Then as now, in other words, there was a wide gulf between what people thought at Westminster and what people thought in the rest of the country. Writing a few days after the speech, the Guardian’s star columnist Peter Jenkins dismissed arguments that Powell and his admirers were merely racist. What motivated them, Jenkins wrote, was the feeling that ‘the politicians are conspiring against the people, that the country is led by men who have no idea about what interests or frightens the ordinary people in the back streets of Wolverhampton’. That sounds pretty familiar to me. Some of Mr Farage’s supporters may, indeed, be racially prejudiced, and certainly one or two of his councillors have some jaw-dropping medieval opinions. But I think there is much more to it than the prejudices of a minority. For decades, surveys have shown that millions of ordinary people dislike the European Union and are alarmed by the influx of so many newcomers, especially in working-class towns struggling to cope with the decline of industry and the rise of unemployment. Contrary to what the sneering metropolitan commentators like to think, the vast majority of these people are not racists. What worries them is the evaporation of jobs which are going overseas, the stagnation of real wages, the shortage of decent housing, the overcrowding of primary schools and the rising pressure on hospital wards and A&E departments. Britain’s political and media classes, however, have shown themselves almost entirely uninterested — and for depressingly obvious reasons. Most British politicians inhabit a gilded bubble. They are often born into comfortable households, go to private schools (or elite comprehensives) and then spend three years at Oxford or Cambridge before becoming political researchers, special advisers and MPs. Well-heeled politicians such as David Cameron, Ed Miliband and Nick Clegg, like their friends and allies in the liberal media, see only the benefits of European membership and the unfettered movement of labour. To them, immigration means cheaper au pairs, cleaners and builders. Because they rarely see the world outside Westminster, except on flying visits to their constituencies, they have no sense of the anxiety in working-class communities and are quick to condemn anybody who violates their shared taboo. One example tells a wider story. Last year, the former editor of Prospect magazine, David Goodhart, published a book (serialised in the Mail), arguing that immigration was undermining national solidarity and the welfare state, and should, therefore, be curtailed. As the incarnation of liberal-minded intellectualism, Mr Goodhart was very obviously not a racist. Yet to many people in London’s political and literary elites, he had put himself beyond the pale. Not only did his expected invitation to the Hay Literary Festival not materialise, but there were howls of protest when his book was shortlisted for the Orwell Prize for political writing. This will surely strike a chord with many Ukip supporters, who, for the past few weeks, have been dismissed as a gaggle of lunatics, losers and would-be Nazis. Perhaps I should say, by the way, that I am very far from being a Ukip supporter and almost certainly never will be. The party’s manifesto seems to me largely fantastical, and the thought of its representatives running our nation’s schools and hospitals fills me with dread. Yet I was shocked by the sanctimonious, patronising coverage in much of the London media. Indeed, reading some columnists, as well as listening to most of our current MPs, it was hard to miss the stench of social and cultural snobbery. As the maverick Left-wing writer John Harris remarked yesterday, there was ‘a collective outbreak of sneering, which started to transcend the party itself and blur into a generalised mockery of anyone minded to support it’. On Twitter, a BBC News channel editor, Jasmine Lawrence, declared that Ukip appealed only to ‘white, middle-class, middle-aged men with sexist/racist views’. And others were little better. Almost incredibly, one Evening Standard columnist, after insisting that Ukip was a ‘racist party’, declared that it was ‘left to Londoners to speak for the nation’. The truth, of course, is that Londoners spend rather too much time speaking for the nation. That is part of the problem. Too often our self-regarding political classes forget that in reality (as opposed to their Westminster bubble), most of us do not live in London and are sick of having to endure the condescending jibes of those who do. As Ukip’s Cheltenham branch chairman, Christina Simmonds, remarked yesterday: ‘They patronise us and try to make out we don’t know what we’re talking about just because they don’t agree with us. But what we’re saying is making sense to good, ordinary people.’ So where do we go from here? It seems certain that tomorrow night’s European results will bring more good news for Mr Farage, and it seems highly implausible that his support will melt away, like the snows in spring, in time for next year’s General Election. For Ed Miliband, the elections have been a wretched embarrassment. As the Labour MP John Mann rightly remarked, the ‘pointy-heads’ at the top of his party seem to have no idea of the pressures facing their working-class voters, while Mr Miliband’s student-union socialism has conspicuously failed to arouse public enthusiasm. For David Cameron, though, the Ukip challenge seems even more urgent. Ever since becoming Tory leader in 2005, the PM has been determined to dismiss and patronise Ukip’s supporters, even calling them ‘loonies, fruitcakes and closet racists’. Far from reaching out to them, Mr Cameron has effectively pretended that Ukip’s supporters do not exist. That strategy has comprehensively failed; indeed, it is Mr Cameron’s condescending, lord-of-the-manor approach that has driven so many working-class and lower-middle-class Tories into Nigel Farage’s embrace. It now seems very plausible that Ukip will pick up at least 10 per cent of the vote at next year’s General Election. In many parts of Britain, especially Southern England, there will almost certainly be a comfortable centre-right majority. But that majority will be divided. And unless there is a stunning collapse in Ukip’s vote, they will surely cost the Tories several seats, perhaps even dozens, next May — thereby putting Ed Miliband into Downing Street. Mr Cameron has always resisted the idea of an electoral pact with Ukip. But I wonder if he is now rethinking his position. The Tories, after all, have a long history of election-winning pacts. In the late-Victorian period they governed in alliance with Joseph Chamberlain’s Liberal Unionists; in 1918 they organised a slate with David Lloyd George’s Liberals; and in the 1930s they formed an alliance with Ramsay MacDonald’s renegade National Labour party and Sir John Simon’s National Liberals. A pact with Ukip would not, therefore, be unprecedented. It would certainly be risky. But since Mr Cameron may well decide that it offers the only chance of retaining the keys to No 10, I would not be surprised to see him change his mind. At the very least, Mr Cameron has to find a way of speaking to those parts of Britain — unsung, ordinary, provincial working-class and lower-middle-class towns up and down the country — that he has so far failed to reach. If he fails, then this time next year he will be looking for a new job. That ought to focus his mind.[/p][/quote]I'm sorry, but you are so verbose that it would exhaust me to try to read all of your letter. Could you re-write it as a synopsis. glad to haveleft
  • Score: -4

10:47am Sat 24 May 14

Puffin-Billy says...

glad to haveleft wrote:
itsnotthatbad wrote:
Puffin-Billy wrote:
By voting for UKIP

you have voted for a party which, through its membership of the EFD officially supports:
Fascism, Racism, Homophobia, and Misogyny.

You have legitimised, and officially welcomed Fascism, Racism, Homophobia, and Misogyny into Bolton Town Hall.

You have given them respectability, and they are now officially sanctioned, free to stalk the streets of Bolton.

By voting for Fascism, Racism, Homophobia, and Misogyny, you have insulted the memory of the fallen of the First and Second World Wars.

.....From Wilfred Owen's Futility:
"Was it for this the clay grew tall?
—O what made fatuous sunbeams toil
To break earth’s sleep at all?"

.....Inscription on Bolton Cenotaph:
“Tell ye your children our brothers died to win a better World our part must be to strive for truth goodwill and peace that their sacrifice be not in vain” .
Hello again Mr.A this is why I voted UKIP. I would never dream of voting for them in the full on elections, but this piece of news here hits the nail right on the head and is exactly how I feel.

His policies fill me with dread. But this is what you get when a smug metropolitan elite treat the people with contempt

Nobody can say it hasn’t been coming.
Yet as the local election results filtered through yesterday morning, there was a palpable sense of shock inside Britain’s political establishment, which had spent weeks writing off Nigel Farage and his motley band of grassroots insurgents.
‘The Ukip fox,’ Mr Farage said delightedly yesterday, ‘is in the Westminster hen house.’
That is putting it mildly — not least since the results in the European elections, which will not be counted until tomorrow, are expected to be even better for Ukip.
To get a sense of how far Mr Farage’s party has come, consider this. In the 2010 General Election, Ukip won just 3 per cent of the vote.
It does not have a single MP, its last election manifesto was wildly incoherent and, with the exception of the ebullient Mr Farage, its representatives are utterly obscure.
Yet for the second consecutive year, Ukip has won around a fifth of the national vote.
Defying all the predictions, it has gained more than 100 council seats. In Essex, it denied the Tories victory in Basildon, Castle Point and Southend.
And in Rotherham, supposedly a working-class Labour bastion, its candidates averaged a whopping 47 per cent of the vote.
By any standards this represents a political earthquake.
Since the 1930s, British politics has essentially been a two-and-a-half-party system, with the Tories and Labour monopolising the dance floor and the Lib Dems, in their various forms, lurking half-heartedly on the fringes.
What is now clear is that those days are finished. Neither David Cameron nor Ed Miliband has the slightest hope of winning as much as 40 per cent of the vote at the next General Election.
And given Ukip’s performance over the past few years, it would be a brave man who would bet against them picking up at least 10 per cent of the vote — and maybe more — in May 2015.
The really extraordinary thing is that this has been the achievement of one man.

Who would have believed that the outspoken Nigel Farage, a privately-educated former City trader who has never won a Westminster seat, would inspire such enthusiasm among ordinary voters from the housing estates of Essex to the post-industrial towns of South Yorkshire?
‘When he walked on to the stage in Portsmouth,’ wrote one reporter in last week’s Spectator magazine, ‘the crowd rose for him with a fervour I’ve never witnessed at a mainstream party conference.’
There is, of course, an obvious explanation. What Mr Farage has tapped into is a widespread national discontent that cannot merely be dismissed — as some metropolitan commentators have tried to do — as racism or xenophobia.
Ukip was founded in 1993 as an obscure anti-federalist pressure group. For years it struggled to gain attention.
Mr Farage’s tactical genius was to turn it into a populist anti-Establishment party, articulating deep-seated public anxieties about the two great taboos of modern political debate: Europe and immigration.
In many corners of the media, as well as in Westminster itself, both of these issues are regarded as toxic. Yet by ignoring them, the politicians have simply handed them to Mr Farage.
In the few days before Thursday’s elections, most of the coverage hinged on immigration.

When an exhausted Mr Farage said he would not want Romanians to move in next door to him, many commentators declared that he had committed an unforgivable gaffe which would poison his national reputation and destroy his support overnight.
I was reminded, however, of an interview Margaret Thatcher gave during a by-election campaign in Ilford in 1978, when she remarked that people were frightened of being ‘swamped’ by immigrants.
Like Mr Farage, she was seen as having committed a dreadful error. However, the supposed gaffe struck a chord, and the Tories promptly romped to victory.
The truth is that the immigration issue has been simmering unhealthily away for at least 40 years. As early as the late-1960s, polls showed that among young and old alike, mass immigration was by far the most unpopular development of the decade.
Among Britain’s politicians, however, immigration has always been the ultimate taboo. When Enoch Powell spoke out in 1968, he was roundly condemned and thrown off the Tory front bench.
Yet, whatever you or I might think of Powell’s famous ‘Rivers of Blood’ speech (a line he never actually used), a Gallup poll at the time found that 74 per cent of people agreed with him, while only 15 per cent disagreed.

Then as now, in other words, there was a wide gulf between what people thought at Westminster and what people thought in the rest of the country.
Writing a few days after the speech, the Guardian’s star columnist Peter Jenkins dismissed arguments that Powell and his admirers were merely racist.
What motivated them, Jenkins wrote, was the feeling that ‘the politicians are conspiring against the people, that the country is led by men who have no idea about what interests or frightens the ordinary people in the back streets of Wolverhampton’.
That sounds pretty familiar to me. Some of Mr Farage’s supporters may, indeed, be racially prejudiced, and certainly one or two of his councillors have some jaw-dropping medieval opinions. But I think there is much more to it than the prejudices of a minority.
For decades, surveys have shown that millions of ordinary people dislike the European Union and are alarmed by the influx of so many newcomers, especially in working-class towns struggling to cope with the decline of industry and the rise of unemployment.
Contrary to what the sneering metropolitan commentators like to think, the vast majority of these people are not racists. What worries them is the evaporation of jobs which are going overseas, the stagnation of real wages, the shortage of decent housing, the overcrowding of primary schools and the rising pressure on hospital wards and A&E departments.
Britain’s political and media classes, however, have shown themselves almost entirely uninterested — and for depressingly obvious reasons.

Most British politicians inhabit a gilded bubble. They are often born into comfortable households, go to private schools (or elite comprehensives) and then spend three years at Oxford or Cambridge before becoming political researchers, special advisers and MPs.
Well-heeled politicians such as David Cameron, Ed Miliband and Nick Clegg, like their friends and allies in the liberal media, see only the benefits of European membership and the unfettered movement of labour. To them, immigration means cheaper au pairs, cleaners and builders.
Because they rarely see the world outside Westminster, except on flying visits to their constituencies, they have no sense of the anxiety in working-class communities and are quick to condemn anybody who violates their shared taboo.
One example tells a wider story. Last year, the former editor of Prospect magazine, David Goodhart, published a book (serialised in the Mail), arguing that immigration was undermining national solidarity and the welfare state, and should, therefore, be curtailed.
As the incarnation of liberal-minded intellectualism, Mr Goodhart was very obviously not a racist. Yet to many people in London’s political and literary elites, he had put himself beyond the pale.
Not only did his expected invitation to the Hay Literary Festival not materialise, but there were howls of protest when his book was shortlisted for the Orwell Prize for political writing. This will surely strike a chord with many Ukip supporters, who, for the past few weeks, have been dismissed as a gaggle of lunatics, losers and would-be Nazis.
Perhaps I should say, by the way, that I am very far from being a Ukip supporter and almost certainly never will be.
The party’s manifesto seems to me largely fantastical, and the thought of its representatives running our nation’s schools and hospitals fills me with dread.
Yet I was shocked by the sanctimonious, patronising coverage in much of the London media. Indeed, reading some columnists, as well as listening to most of our current MPs, it was hard to miss the stench of social and cultural snobbery.

As the maverick Left-wing writer John Harris remarked yesterday, there was ‘a collective outbreak of sneering, which started to transcend the party itself and blur into a generalised mockery of anyone minded to support it’.
On Twitter, a BBC News channel editor, Jasmine Lawrence, declared that Ukip appealed only to ‘white, middle-class, middle-aged men with sexist/racist views’.
And others were little better. Almost incredibly, one Evening Standard columnist, after insisting that Ukip was a ‘racist party’, declared that it was ‘left to Londoners to speak for the nation’.
The truth, of course, is that Londoners spend rather too much time speaking for the nation. That is part of the problem.
Too often our self-regarding political classes forget that in reality (as opposed to their Westminster bubble), most of us do not live in London and are sick of having to endure the condescending jibes of those who do.
As Ukip’s Cheltenham branch chairman, Christina Simmonds, remarked yesterday: ‘They patronise us and try to make out we don’t know what we’re talking about just because they don’t agree with us. But what we’re saying is making sense to good, ordinary people.’
So where do we go from here?
It seems certain that tomorrow night’s European results will bring more good news for Mr Farage, and it seems highly implausible that his support will melt away, like the snows in spring, in time for next year’s General Election.

For Ed Miliband, the elections have been a wretched embarrassment. As the Labour MP John Mann rightly remarked, the ‘pointy-heads’ at the top of his party seem to have no idea of the pressures facing their working-class voters, while Mr Miliband’s student-union socialism has conspicuously failed to arouse public enthusiasm.
For David Cameron, though, the Ukip challenge seems even more urgent. Ever since becoming Tory leader in 2005, the PM has been determined to dismiss and patronise Ukip’s supporters, even calling them ‘loonies, fruitcakes and closet racists’.
Far from reaching out to them, Mr Cameron has effectively pretended that Ukip’s supporters do not exist.
That strategy has comprehensively failed; indeed, it is Mr Cameron’s condescending, lord-of-the-manor approach that has driven so many working-class and lower-middle-class Tories into Nigel Farage’s embrace.
It now seems very plausible that Ukip will pick up at least 10 per cent of the vote at next year’s General Election. In many parts of Britain, especially Southern England, there will almost certainly be a comfortable centre-right majority.
But that majority will be divided. And unless there is a stunning collapse in Ukip’s vote, they will surely cost the Tories several seats, perhaps even dozens, next May — thereby putting Ed Miliband into Downing Street.
Mr Cameron has always resisted the idea of an electoral pact with Ukip. But I wonder if he is now rethinking his position.
The Tories, after all, have a long history of election-winning pacts. In the late-Victorian period they governed in alliance with Joseph Chamberlain’s Liberal Unionists; in 1918 they organised a slate with David Lloyd George’s Liberals; and in the 1930s they formed an alliance with Ramsay MacDonald’s renegade National Labour party and Sir John Simon’s National Liberals.
A pact with Ukip would not, therefore, be unprecedented. It would certainly be risky. But since Mr Cameron may well decide that it offers the only chance of retaining the keys to No 10, I would not be surprised to see him change his mind.
At the very least, Mr Cameron has to find a way of speaking to those parts of Britain — unsung, ordinary, provincial working-class and lower-middle-class towns up and down the country — that he has so far failed to reach.
If he fails, then this time next year he will be looking for a new job. That ought to focus his mind.
I'm sorry, but you are so verbose that it would exhaust me to try to read all of your letter.
Could you re-write it as a synopsis.
"His policies fill me with dread"....so you vote for his policies.
Sounds eminently sensible to me!
[quote][p][bold]glad to haveleft[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]itsnotthatbad[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Puffin-Billy[/bold] wrote: By voting for UKIP you have voted for a party which, through its membership of the EFD officially supports: Fascism, Racism, Homophobia, and Misogyny. You have legitimised, and officially welcomed Fascism, Racism, Homophobia, and Misogyny into Bolton Town Hall. You have given them respectability, and they are now officially sanctioned, free to stalk the streets of Bolton. By voting for Fascism, Racism, Homophobia, and Misogyny, you have insulted the memory of the fallen of the First and Second World Wars. .....From Wilfred Owen's Futility: "Was it for this the clay grew tall? —O what made fatuous sunbeams toil To break earth’s sleep at all?" .....Inscription on Bolton Cenotaph: “Tell ye your children our brothers died to win a better World our part must be to strive for truth goodwill and peace that their sacrifice be not in vain” .[/p][/quote]Hello again Mr.A this is why I voted UKIP. I would never dream of voting for them in the full on elections, but this piece of news here hits the nail right on the head and is exactly how I feel. His policies fill me with dread. But this is what you get when a smug metropolitan elite treat the people with contempt Nobody can say it hasn’t been coming. Yet as the local election results filtered through yesterday morning, there was a palpable sense of shock inside Britain’s political establishment, which had spent weeks writing off Nigel Farage and his motley band of grassroots insurgents. ‘The Ukip fox,’ Mr Farage said delightedly yesterday, ‘is in the Westminster hen house.’ That is putting it mildly — not least since the results in the European elections, which will not be counted until tomorrow, are expected to be even better for Ukip. To get a sense of how far Mr Farage’s party has come, consider this. In the 2010 General Election, Ukip won just 3 per cent of the vote. It does not have a single MP, its last election manifesto was wildly incoherent and, with the exception of the ebullient Mr Farage, its representatives are utterly obscure. Yet for the second consecutive year, Ukip has won around a fifth of the national vote. Defying all the predictions, it has gained more than 100 council seats. In Essex, it denied the Tories victory in Basildon, Castle Point and Southend. And in Rotherham, supposedly a working-class Labour bastion, its candidates averaged a whopping 47 per cent of the vote. By any standards this represents a political earthquake. Since the 1930s, British politics has essentially been a two-and-a-half-party system, with the Tories and Labour monopolising the dance floor and the Lib Dems, in their various forms, lurking half-heartedly on the fringes. What is now clear is that those days are finished. Neither David Cameron nor Ed Miliband has the slightest hope of winning as much as 40 per cent of the vote at the next General Election. And given Ukip’s performance over the past few years, it would be a brave man who would bet against them picking up at least 10 per cent of the vote — and maybe more — in May 2015. The really extraordinary thing is that this has been the achievement of one man. Who would have believed that the outspoken Nigel Farage, a privately-educated former City trader who has never won a Westminster seat, would inspire such enthusiasm among ordinary voters from the housing estates of Essex to the post-industrial towns of South Yorkshire? ‘When he walked on to the stage in Portsmouth,’ wrote one reporter in last week’s Spectator magazine, ‘the crowd rose for him with a fervour I’ve never witnessed at a mainstream party conference.’ There is, of course, an obvious explanation. What Mr Farage has tapped into is a widespread national discontent that cannot merely be dismissed — as some metropolitan commentators have tried to do — as racism or xenophobia. Ukip was founded in 1993 as an obscure anti-federalist pressure group. For years it struggled to gain attention. Mr Farage’s tactical genius was to turn it into a populist anti-Establishment party, articulating deep-seated public anxieties about the two great taboos of modern political debate: Europe and immigration. In many corners of the media, as well as in Westminster itself, both of these issues are regarded as toxic. Yet by ignoring them, the politicians have simply handed them to Mr Farage. In the few days before Thursday’s elections, most of the coverage hinged on immigration. When an exhausted Mr Farage said he would not want Romanians to move in next door to him, many commentators declared that he had committed an unforgivable gaffe which would poison his national reputation and destroy his support overnight. I was reminded, however, of an interview Margaret Thatcher gave during a by-election campaign in Ilford in 1978, when she remarked that people were frightened of being ‘swamped’ by immigrants. Like Mr Farage, she was seen as having committed a dreadful error. However, the supposed gaffe struck a chord, and the Tories promptly romped to victory. The truth is that the immigration issue has been simmering unhealthily away for at least 40 years. As early as the late-1960s, polls showed that among young and old alike, mass immigration was by far the most unpopular development of the decade. Among Britain’s politicians, however, immigration has always been the ultimate taboo. When Enoch Powell spoke out in 1968, he was roundly condemned and thrown off the Tory front bench. Yet, whatever you or I might think of Powell’s famous ‘Rivers of Blood’ speech (a line he never actually used), a Gallup poll at the time found that 74 per cent of people agreed with him, while only 15 per cent disagreed. Then as now, in other words, there was a wide gulf between what people thought at Westminster and what people thought in the rest of the country. Writing a few days after the speech, the Guardian’s star columnist Peter Jenkins dismissed arguments that Powell and his admirers were merely racist. What motivated them, Jenkins wrote, was the feeling that ‘the politicians are conspiring against the people, that the country is led by men who have no idea about what interests or frightens the ordinary people in the back streets of Wolverhampton’. That sounds pretty familiar to me. Some of Mr Farage’s supporters may, indeed, be racially prejudiced, and certainly one or two of his councillors have some jaw-dropping medieval opinions. But I think there is much more to it than the prejudices of a minority. For decades, surveys have shown that millions of ordinary people dislike the European Union and are alarmed by the influx of so many newcomers, especially in working-class towns struggling to cope with the decline of industry and the rise of unemployment. Contrary to what the sneering metropolitan commentators like to think, the vast majority of these people are not racists. What worries them is the evaporation of jobs which are going overseas, the stagnation of real wages, the shortage of decent housing, the overcrowding of primary schools and the rising pressure on hospital wards and A&E departments. Britain’s political and media classes, however, have shown themselves almost entirely uninterested — and for depressingly obvious reasons. Most British politicians inhabit a gilded bubble. They are often born into comfortable households, go to private schools (or elite comprehensives) and then spend three years at Oxford or Cambridge before becoming political researchers, special advisers and MPs. Well-heeled politicians such as David Cameron, Ed Miliband and Nick Clegg, like their friends and allies in the liberal media, see only the benefits of European membership and the unfettered movement of labour. To them, immigration means cheaper au pairs, cleaners and builders. Because they rarely see the world outside Westminster, except on flying visits to their constituencies, they have no sense of the anxiety in working-class communities and are quick to condemn anybody who violates their shared taboo. One example tells a wider story. Last year, the former editor of Prospect magazine, David Goodhart, published a book (serialised in the Mail), arguing that immigration was undermining national solidarity and the welfare state, and should, therefore, be curtailed. As the incarnation of liberal-minded intellectualism, Mr Goodhart was very obviously not a racist. Yet to many people in London’s political and literary elites, he had put himself beyond the pale. Not only did his expected invitation to the Hay Literary Festival not materialise, but there were howls of protest when his book was shortlisted for the Orwell Prize for political writing. This will surely strike a chord with many Ukip supporters, who, for the past few weeks, have been dismissed as a gaggle of lunatics, losers and would-be Nazis. Perhaps I should say, by the way, that I am very far from being a Ukip supporter and almost certainly never will be. The party’s manifesto seems to me largely fantastical, and the thought of its representatives running our nation’s schools and hospitals fills me with dread. Yet I was shocked by the sanctimonious, patronising coverage in much of the London media. Indeed, reading some columnists, as well as listening to most of our current MPs, it was hard to miss the stench of social and cultural snobbery. As the maverick Left-wing writer John Harris remarked yesterday, there was ‘a collective outbreak of sneering, which started to transcend the party itself and blur into a generalised mockery of anyone minded to support it’. On Twitter, a BBC News channel editor, Jasmine Lawrence, declared that Ukip appealed only to ‘white, middle-class, middle-aged men with sexist/racist views’. And others were little better. Almost incredibly, one Evening Standard columnist, after insisting that Ukip was a ‘racist party’, declared that it was ‘left to Londoners to speak for the nation’. The truth, of course, is that Londoners spend rather too much time speaking for the nation. That is part of the problem. Too often our self-regarding political classes forget that in reality (as opposed to their Westminster bubble), most of us do not live in London and are sick of having to endure the condescending jibes of those who do. As Ukip’s Cheltenham branch chairman, Christina Simmonds, remarked yesterday: ‘They patronise us and try to make out we don’t know what we’re talking about just because they don’t agree with us. But what we’re saying is making sense to good, ordinary people.’ So where do we go from here? It seems certain that tomorrow night’s European results will bring more good news for Mr Farage, and it seems highly implausible that his support will melt away, like the snows in spring, in time for next year’s General Election. For Ed Miliband, the elections have been a wretched embarrassment. As the Labour MP John Mann rightly remarked, the ‘pointy-heads’ at the top of his party seem to have no idea of the pressures facing their working-class voters, while Mr Miliband’s student-union socialism has conspicuously failed to arouse public enthusiasm. For David Cameron, though, the Ukip challenge seems even more urgent. Ever since becoming Tory leader in 2005, the PM has been determined to dismiss and patronise Ukip’s supporters, even calling them ‘loonies, fruitcakes and closet racists’. Far from reaching out to them, Mr Cameron has effectively pretended that Ukip’s supporters do not exist. That strategy has comprehensively failed; indeed, it is Mr Cameron’s condescending, lord-of-the-manor approach that has driven so many working-class and lower-middle-class Tories into Nigel Farage’s embrace. It now seems very plausible that Ukip will pick up at least 10 per cent of the vote at next year’s General Election. In many parts of Britain, especially Southern England, there will almost certainly be a comfortable centre-right majority. But that majority will be divided. And unless there is a stunning collapse in Ukip’s vote, they will surely cost the Tories several seats, perhaps even dozens, next May — thereby putting Ed Miliband into Downing Street. Mr Cameron has always resisted the idea of an electoral pact with Ukip. But I wonder if he is now rethinking his position. The Tories, after all, have a long history of election-winning pacts. In the late-Victorian period they governed in alliance with Joseph Chamberlain’s Liberal Unionists; in 1918 they organised a slate with David Lloyd George’s Liberals; and in the 1930s they formed an alliance with Ramsay MacDonald’s renegade National Labour party and Sir John Simon’s National Liberals. A pact with Ukip would not, therefore, be unprecedented. It would certainly be risky. But since Mr Cameron may well decide that it offers the only chance of retaining the keys to No 10, I would not be surprised to see him change his mind. At the very least, Mr Cameron has to find a way of speaking to those parts of Britain — unsung, ordinary, provincial working-class and lower-middle-class towns up and down the country — that he has so far failed to reach. If he fails, then this time next year he will be looking for a new job. That ought to focus his mind.[/p][/quote]I'm sorry, but you are so verbose that it would exhaust me to try to read all of your letter. Could you re-write it as a synopsis.[/p][/quote]"His policies fill me with dread"....so you vote for his policies. Sounds eminently sensible to me! Puffin-Billy
  • Score: -8

11:33am Sat 24 May 14

thomas222 says...

Puffin-Billy wrote:
By voting for UKIP

you have voted for a party which, through its membership of the EFD officially supports:
Fascism, Racism, Homophobia, and Misogyny.

You have legitimised, and officially welcomed Fascism, Racism, Homophobia, and Misogyny into Bolton Town Hall.

You have given them respectability, and they are now officially sanctioned, free to stalk the streets of Bolton.

By voting for Fascism, Racism, Homophobia, and Misogyny, you have insulted the memory of the fallen of the First and Second World Wars.

.....From Wilfred Owen's Futility:
"Was it for this the clay grew tall?
—O what made fatuous sunbeams toil
To break earth’s sleep at all?"

.....Inscription on Bolton Cenotaph:
“Tell ye your children our brothers died to win a better World our part must be to strive for truth goodwill and peace that their sacrifice be not in vain” .
And you voted for ?
[quote][p][bold]Puffin-Billy[/bold] wrote: By voting for UKIP you have voted for a party which, through its membership of the EFD officially supports: Fascism, Racism, Homophobia, and Misogyny. You have legitimised, and officially welcomed Fascism, Racism, Homophobia, and Misogyny into Bolton Town Hall. You have given them respectability, and they are now officially sanctioned, free to stalk the streets of Bolton. By voting for Fascism, Racism, Homophobia, and Misogyny, you have insulted the memory of the fallen of the First and Second World Wars. .....From Wilfred Owen's Futility: "Was it for this the clay grew tall? —O what made fatuous sunbeams toil To break earth’s sleep at all?" .....Inscription on Bolton Cenotaph: “Tell ye your children our brothers died to win a better World our part must be to strive for truth goodwill and peace that their sacrifice be not in vain” .[/p][/quote]And you voted for ? thomas222
  • Score: 1

11:37am Sat 24 May 14

Puffin-Billy says...

dystop wrote:
Puffin-Billy wrote:
http://www.hopenotha


te.org.uk/subscribe/



....................


....................


....................


...............
This is what soldiers in 1914 died for.
This is what Bolton UKIP Cllr Parkinson admires.
This is what Bolton UKIP supporters admire.

....................


.........
A far right group has said it will step up security for Ukip leader Nigel Farage’s visit to Edinburgh tonight by deploying armoured vehicles and ex-military personnel to protect him.
Britain First, which is fielding its own candidates in the European elections, said it was not prepared to allow “fellow patriots” to be “bullied off our streets”.
http://www.edinburgh


news.scotsman.com/ne


ws/nigel-farage-face


s-barrage-of-edinbur


gh-protest-1-3404499



.................
A gang of teenagers terrorised a town's Muslim community, attacking two elderly men and an eight-year-old boy, a court heard.
http://www.expressan


dstar.com/news/2014/


04/30/teenagers-terr


orised-muslim-commun


ity-in-town/
....................


..........
Strip public of the vote says Ukip candidate
http://www.politics.


co.uk/news/2014/05/1


3/strip-public-of-th


e-vote-says-ukip-can


didate
....................


..........
*“We must pray for the gay community that they will see that they are indeed prisoners who need freedom.”
http://www.basingsto


kegazette.co.uk/news


/11230101._/?
....................


............
*You’re one of us, Dutch xenophobe Geert Wilders tells Nigel Farage
http://www.hopenotha


te.org.uk/news/home/


article/3211/yoursqu


ore-one-of-us-dutch-


xenophobe-geert-wild


ers-tells-nigel-fara


ge
....................


....................


..........
*"Any normal and fair-minded person would have a perfect right to be concerned if a group of Romanian people suddenly moved in next door."
http://www.bbc.co.uk


/news/uk-27459923
....................


...........
*Enid Lindsay, who is standing in Fazakerley , called voters “idiots”, while Clubmoor’s Paul Forrest claimed “racism is a natural outcome of evolution” and said the Catholic church is “far more dangerous” than the Ku Klux Klan (KKK).
....................


...................
Meanwhile John Halvorsen, a candidate in Everton , lists the Liverpool division of the far-right English Defence League among his “likes” on Facebook. He is also a member of an online group called “Was Enoch Powell Right?”.
http://www.liverpool


echo.co.uk/news/live


rpool-news/wannabe-l


iverpool-ukip-counci


llor-wants-7134800
....................


..........

Ukip chairwoman Janice Atkinson who called for protesters who ‘hurl abuse’ to be arrested caught swearing at anti-racism activists
Janice Atkinson, who is the party’s South East chair and described herself as Nigel Farage’s “number two”, was pictured raising her middle finger at members of the People’s Assembly in Ashford, Kent.
http://www.independe


nt.co.uk/news/uk/pol


itics/ukip-chairwoma


n-janice-atkinson-wh


o-called-for-protest


ers-who-hurl-abuse-t


o-be-arrested-Accord


ing to the protesters, former Tory candidate Ms Atkinson made “personal comments about body size”, and said: “I don't care where you f***ing post this, just f**k off!”caught-sweari


ng-at-antiracism-act


ivists-9392147.html
....................


......
Gerard Batten alongside far-right Dutch politician Geert Wilders.
http://www.politics.


co.uk/news/2014/05/1


6/ukip-mep-threatens


-to-prosecute-anti-r


acism-group
....................


..
Heino Vockrodt, who is standing for the Dudden Hill seat on May 22, accused Muslims of grooming sex slaves, compared a Willesden road to war torn Helmand Province and claimed Islam was an ideology not a religion.
http://www.kilburnti


mes.co.uk/news/race_


row_erupts_after_bre


nt_ukip_candidate_sl


ates_muslims_in_rant


ing_email_1_3600791?


usurv=skip
....................


.............
Dutch populist Geert Wilders said Wednesday he still hopes to bring Britain's anti-EU leader Nigel Farage into an alliance with France's Marine Le Pen despite her party's perceived anti-Semitism.
http://www.globalpos


t.com/dispatch/news/


afp/140514/dutch-pop


ulist-still-hopes-fa


rage-le-pen-alliance



....................


.....
A British Asian leader of Ukip’s youth wing has quit the party, branding it “racist” and “terrifying”.

Sanya-Jeet Thandi, who had been introduced at Ukip’s party conference as a future leader, said the party has abandoned its core supporters and now appealed to the “stupidity of ignorant anti-immigrant voters for electoral gain”.
http://www.hopenotha


te.org.uk/news/home/


article/3192/british


-asian-ukip-youth-le


ader-quits-racist-an


d-terrifying-ukip
..................
Ukip faces a “cash-for-Euro-sea


ts” scandal after forcing MEPs to donate large sums and threatening to bar those who refused from standing again, its former deputy leader says.
http://www.thetimes.


co.uk/tto/news/polit


ics/article4089092.e


ce?CMP=OTH-gnws-stan


dard-2014_05_13
This is a perfect example of cherry picking (with the intention of misleading people). Now go and find all the examples of white people committing crimes and post those.
The vast majority of the above named ARE white.
[quote][p][bold]dystop[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Puffin-Billy[/bold] wrote: http://www.hopenotha te.org.uk/subscribe/ .................... .................... .................... ............... This is what soldiers in 1914 died for. This is what Bolton UKIP Cllr Parkinson admires. This is what Bolton UKIP supporters admire. .................... ......... A far right group has said it will step up security for Ukip leader Nigel Farage’s visit to Edinburgh tonight by deploying armoured vehicles and ex-military personnel to protect him. Britain First, which is fielding its own candidates in the European elections, said it was not prepared to allow “fellow patriots” to be “bullied off our streets”. http://www.edinburgh news.scotsman.com/ne ws/nigel-farage-face s-barrage-of-edinbur gh-protest-1-3404499 ................. A gang of teenagers terrorised a town's Muslim community, attacking two elderly men and an eight-year-old boy, a court heard. http://www.expressan dstar.com/news/2014/ 04/30/teenagers-terr orised-muslim-commun ity-in-town/ .................... .......... Strip public of the vote says Ukip candidate http://www.politics. co.uk/news/2014/05/1 3/strip-public-of-th e-vote-says-ukip-can didate .................... .......... *“We must pray for the gay community that they will see that they are indeed prisoners who need freedom.” http://www.basingsto kegazette.co.uk/news /11230101._/? .................... ............ *You’re one of us, Dutch xenophobe Geert Wilders tells Nigel Farage http://www.hopenotha te.org.uk/news/home/ article/3211/yoursqu ore-one-of-us-dutch- xenophobe-geert-wild ers-tells-nigel-fara ge .................... .................... .......... *"Any normal and fair-minded person would have a perfect right to be concerned if a group of Romanian people suddenly moved in next door." http://www.bbc.co.uk /news/uk-27459923 .................... ........... *Enid Lindsay, who is standing in Fazakerley , called voters “idiots”, while Clubmoor’s Paul Forrest claimed “racism is a natural outcome of evolution” and said the Catholic church is “far more dangerous” than the Ku Klux Klan (KKK). .................... ................... Meanwhile John Halvorsen, a candidate in Everton , lists the Liverpool division of the far-right English Defence League among his “likes” on Facebook. He is also a member of an online group called “Was Enoch Powell Right?”. http://www.liverpool echo.co.uk/news/live rpool-news/wannabe-l iverpool-ukip-counci llor-wants-7134800 .................... .......... Ukip chairwoman Janice Atkinson who called for protesters who ‘hurl abuse’ to be arrested caught swearing at anti-racism activists Janice Atkinson, who is the party’s South East chair and described herself as Nigel Farage’s “number two”, was pictured raising her middle finger at members of the People’s Assembly in Ashford, Kent. http://www.independe nt.co.uk/news/uk/pol itics/ukip-chairwoma n-janice-atkinson-wh o-called-for-protest ers-who-hurl-abuse-t o-be-arrested-Accord ing to the protesters, former Tory candidate Ms Atkinson made “personal comments about [Ms Pizzey’s] body size”, and said: “I don't care where you f***ing post this, just f**k off!”caught-sweari ng-at-antiracism-act ivists-9392147.html .................... ...... Gerard Batten alongside far-right Dutch politician Geert Wilders. http://www.politics. co.uk/news/2014/05/1 6/ukip-mep-threatens -to-prosecute-anti-r acism-group .................... .. Heino Vockrodt, who is standing for the Dudden Hill seat on May 22, accused Muslims of grooming sex slaves, compared a Willesden road to war torn Helmand Province and claimed Islam was an ideology not a religion. http://www.kilburnti mes.co.uk/news/race_ row_erupts_after_bre nt_ukip_candidate_sl ates_muslims_in_rant ing_email_1_3600791? usurv=skip .................... ............. Dutch populist Geert Wilders said Wednesday he still hopes to bring Britain's anti-EU leader Nigel Farage into an alliance with France's Marine Le Pen despite her party's perceived anti-Semitism. http://www.globalpos t.com/dispatch/news/ afp/140514/dutch-pop ulist-still-hopes-fa rage-le-pen-alliance .................... ..... A British Asian leader of Ukip’s youth wing has quit the party, branding it “racist” and “terrifying”. Sanya-Jeet Thandi, who had been introduced at Ukip’s party conference as a future leader, said the party has abandoned its core supporters and now appealed to the “stupidity of ignorant anti-immigrant voters for electoral gain”. http://www.hopenotha te.org.uk/news/home/ article/3192/british -asian-ukip-youth-le ader-quits-racist-an d-terrifying-ukip .................. Ukip faces a “cash-for-Euro-sea ts” scandal after forcing MEPs to donate large sums and threatening to bar those who refused from standing again, its former deputy leader says. http://www.thetimes. co.uk/tto/news/polit ics/article4089092.e ce?CMP=OTH-gnws-stan dard-2014_05_13[/p][/quote]This is a perfect example of cherry picking (with the intention of misleading people). Now go and find all the examples of white people committing crimes and post those.[/p][/quote]The vast majority of the above named ARE white. Puffin-Billy
  • Score: -2

11:40am Sat 24 May 14

thomas222 says...

dystop wrote:
Randolf Litler !!! wrote:
Jim271 and markthementalist

Bloody well said and truthful, this country is a nothing but a s h i t e h o l e now with uncontrolled immigration over the last 40 years and unbelievably it's still going on.
What will it be like in bolton in 5, 10, 20, years, i pity our future generations.it's
DISGRACEFUL.
Firstly, we don't have uncontrolled immigration. I challenge you to ask 10,000 people to just fly over to Heathrow and cross into the border unchallenged. That doesn't happen, meaning immigration isn't "uncontrolled".


Secondly, how has the country become bad? You didn't mention HOW, in what way it's bad.

Third, what is it that immigrants are doing that are causing it? You didn't mention that either. Unless you're just being racist.

If you want to blame someone, you can blame the people who actually have power - the government's actions in lending sub-prime and bailing out the banks, triggering off the national and contributing to the global financial crisis. They actually had an effect. Think before you type.
Of course its uncontrolled from anywhere from the EU and we are uncontrolled because we cant pick the ones we want in. Immigrants are causing overcrowding in Housing,Hospitals,Do
ctors,Schools for a starter, are you blind for Gods sake. Your correct on the Government bankrolling the Banksters though. Crooks.
[quote][p][bold]dystop[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Randolf Litler !!![/bold] wrote: Jim271 and markthementalist Bloody well said and truthful, this country is a nothing but a s h i t e h o l e now with uncontrolled immigration over the last 40 years and unbelievably it's still going on. What will it be like in bolton in 5, 10, 20, years, i pity our future generations.it's DISGRACEFUL.[/p][/quote]Firstly, we don't have uncontrolled immigration. I challenge you to ask 10,000 people to just fly over to Heathrow and cross into the border unchallenged. That doesn't happen, meaning immigration isn't "uncontrolled". Secondly, how has the country become bad? You didn't mention HOW, in what way it's bad. Third, what is it that immigrants are doing that are causing it? You didn't mention that either. Unless you're just being racist. If you want to blame someone, you can blame the people who actually have power - the government's actions in lending sub-prime and bailing out the banks, triggering off the national and contributing to the global financial crisis. They actually had an effect. Think before you type.[/p][/quote]Of course its uncontrolled from anywhere from the EU and we are uncontrolled because we cant pick the ones we want in. Immigrants are causing overcrowding in Housing,Hospitals,Do ctors,Schools for a starter, are you blind for Gods sake. Your correct on the Government bankrolling the Banksters though. Crooks. thomas222
  • Score: 7

12:07pm Sat 24 May 14

markthementalist says...

dystop wrote:
markthementalist wrote:
I live in the Halliwell area and voted at my local polling station. I voted UKIP as rampant immigration is sadly bringing down my area. In the station to collect my sheet I was with 2 white people and 22 Indian/Pakistani's. My vote was and wasn't wasted as I used my electoral voice but I knew my vote would not influence anything. When will ALL the people in my area vote?
Laziness is not as rampant as immigration I am afraid.
You say "bringing down your area" like their very presence is causing problems. Are they actively committing many, many crimes? Because otherwise you're saying your area is falling apart for racist reasons.

Even if crime is high in your area, why do you need to mention the fact that they're Indian/Pakistani? Does that have any bearing on someone's likelihood to commit crime? No, it doesn't. So whatever way you look at it, you're being racist.
Read my post again. I did not mention crime and at no point could my point be seen as racist.
My point was that ethnic minorities seemed to vote but from what I saw I the minority. I seem to think you are trying to taint my views to match an agenda.
[quote][p][bold]dystop[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]markthementalist[/bold] wrote: I live in the Halliwell area and voted at my local polling station. I voted UKIP as rampant immigration is sadly bringing down my area. In the station to collect my sheet I was with 2 white people and 22 Indian/Pakistani's. My vote was and wasn't wasted as I used my electoral voice but I knew my vote would not influence anything. When will ALL the people in my area vote? Laziness is not as rampant as immigration I am afraid.[/p][/quote]You say "bringing down your area" like their very presence is causing problems. Are they actively committing many, many crimes? Because otherwise you're saying your area is falling apart for racist reasons. Even if crime is high in your area, why do you need to mention the fact that they're Indian/Pakistani? Does that have any bearing on someone's likelihood to commit crime? No, it doesn't. So whatever way you look at it, you're being racist.[/p][/quote]Read my post again. I did not mention crime and at no point could my point be seen as racist. My point was that ethnic minorities seemed to vote but from what I saw I the minority. I seem to think you are trying to taint my views to match an agenda. markthementalist
  • Score: 7

12:11pm Sat 24 May 14

itsnotthatbad says...

Puffin-Billy wrote:
glad to haveleft wrote:
itsnotthatbad wrote:
Puffin-Billy wrote:
By voting for UKIP

you have voted for a party which, through its membership of the EFD officially supports:
Fascism, Racism, Homophobia, and Misogyny.

You have legitimised, and officially welcomed Fascism, Racism, Homophobia, and Misogyny into Bolton Town Hall.

You have given them respectability, and they are now officially sanctioned, free to stalk the streets of Bolton.

By voting for Fascism, Racism, Homophobia, and Misogyny, you have insulted the memory of the fallen of the First and Second World Wars.

.....From Wilfred Owen's Futility:
"Was it for this the clay grew tall?
—O what made fatuous sunbeams toil
To break earth’s sleep at all?"

.....Inscription on Bolton Cenotaph:
“Tell ye your children our brothers died to win a better World our part must be to strive for truth goodwill and peace that their sacrifice be not in vain” .
Hello again Mr.A this is why I voted UKIP. I would never dream of voting for them in the full on elections, but this piece of news here hits the nail right on the head and is exactly how I feel.

His policies fill me with dread. But this is what you get when a smug metropolitan elite treat the people with contempt

Nobody can say it hasn’t been coming.
Yet as the local election results filtered through yesterday morning, there was a palpable sense of shock inside Britain’s political establishment, which had spent weeks writing off Nigel Farage and his motley band of grassroots insurgents.
‘The Ukip fox,’ Mr Farage said delightedly yesterday, ‘is in the Westminster hen house.’
That is putting it mildly — not least since the results in the European elections, which will not be counted until tomorrow, are expected to be even better for Ukip.
To get a sense of how far Mr Farage’s party has come, consider this. In the 2010 General Election, Ukip won just 3 per cent of the vote.
It does not have a single MP, its last election manifesto was wildly incoherent and, with the exception of the ebullient Mr Farage, its representatives are utterly obscure.
Yet for the second consecutive year, Ukip has won around a fifth of the national vote.
Defying all the predictions, it has gained more than 100 council seats. In Essex, it denied the Tories victory in Basildon, Castle Point and Southend.
And in Rotherham, supposedly a working-class Labour bastion, its candidates averaged a whopping 47 per cent of the vote.
By any standards this represents a political earthquake.
Since the 1930s, British politics has essentially been a two-and-a-half-party system, with the Tories and Labour monopolising the dance floor and the Lib Dems, in their various forms, lurking half-heartedly on the fringes.
What is now clear is that those days are finished. Neither David Cameron nor Ed Miliband has the slightest hope of winning as much as 40 per cent of the vote at the next General Election.
And given Ukip’s performance over the past few years, it would be a brave man who would bet against them picking up at least 10 per cent of the vote — and maybe more — in May 2015.
The really extraordinary thing is that this has been the achievement of one man.

Who would have believed that the outspoken Nigel Farage, a privately-educated former City trader who has never won a Westminster seat, would inspire such enthusiasm among ordinary voters from the housing estates of Essex to the post-industrial towns of South Yorkshire?
‘When he walked on to the stage in Portsmouth,’ wrote one reporter in last week’s Spectator magazine, ‘the crowd rose for him with a fervour I’ve never witnessed at a mainstream party conference.’
There is, of course, an obvious explanation. What Mr Farage has tapped into is a widespread national discontent that cannot merely be dismissed — as some metropolitan commentators have tried to do — as racism or xenophobia.
Ukip was founded in 1993 as an obscure anti-federalist pressure group. For years it struggled to gain attention.
Mr Farage’s tactical genius was to turn it into a populist anti-Establishment party, articulating deep-seated public anxieties about the two great taboos of modern political debate: Europe and immigration.
In many corners of the media, as well as in Westminster itself, both of these issues are regarded as toxic. Yet by ignoring them, the politicians have simply handed them to Mr Farage.
In the few days before Thursday’s elections, most of the coverage hinged on immigration.

When an exhausted Mr Farage said he would not want Romanians to move in next door to him, many commentators declared that he had committed an unforgivable gaffe which would poison his national reputation and destroy his support overnight.
I was reminded, however, of an interview Margaret Thatcher gave during a by-election campaign in Ilford in 1978, when she remarked that people were frightened of being ‘swamped’ by immigrants.
Like Mr Farage, she was seen as having committed a dreadful error. However, the supposed gaffe struck a chord, and the Tories promptly romped to victory.
The truth is that the immigration issue has been simmering unhealthily away for at least 40 years. As early as the late-1960s, polls showed that among young and old alike, mass immigration was by far the most unpopular development of the decade.
Among Britain’s politicians, however, immigration has always been the ultimate taboo. When Enoch Powell spoke out in 1968, he was roundly condemned and thrown off the Tory front bench.
Yet, whatever you or I might think of Powell’s famous ‘Rivers of Blood’ speech (a line he never actually used), a Gallup poll at the time found that 74 per cent of people agreed with him, while only 15 per cent disagreed.

Then as now, in other words, there was a wide gulf between what people thought at Westminster and what people thought in the rest of the country.
Writing a few days after the speech, the Guardian’s star columnist Peter Jenkins dismissed arguments that Powell and his admirers were merely racist.
What motivated them, Jenkins wrote, was the feeling that ‘the politicians are conspiring against the people, that the country is led by men who have no idea about what interests or frightens the ordinary people in the back streets of Wolverhampton’.
That sounds pretty familiar to me. Some of Mr Farage’s supporters may, indeed, be racially prejudiced, and certainly one or two of his councillors have some jaw-dropping medieval opinions. But I think there is much more to it than the prejudices of a minority.
For decades, surveys have shown that millions of ordinary people dislike the European Union and are alarmed by the influx of so many newcomers, especially in working-class towns struggling to cope with the decline of industry and the rise of unemployment.
Contrary to what the sneering metropolitan commentators like to think, the vast majority of these people are not racists. What worries them is the evaporation of jobs which are going overseas, the stagnation of real wages, the shortage of decent housing, the overcrowding of primary schools and the rising pressure on hospital wards and A&E departments.
Britain’s political and media classes, however, have shown themselves almost entirely uninterested — and for depressingly obvious reasons.

Most British politicians inhabit a gilded bubble. They are often born into comfortable households, go to private schools (or elite comprehensives) and then spend three years at Oxford or Cambridge before becoming political researchers, special advisers and MPs.
Well-heeled politicians such as David Cameron, Ed Miliband and Nick Clegg, like their friends and allies in the liberal media, see only the benefits of European membership and the unfettered movement of labour. To them, immigration means cheaper au pairs, cleaners and builders.
Because they rarely see the world outside Westminster, except on flying visits to their constituencies, they have no sense of the anxiety in working-class communities and are quick to condemn anybody who violates their shared taboo.
One example tells a wider story. Last year, the former editor of Prospect magazine, David Goodhart, published a book (serialised in the Mail), arguing that immigration was undermining national solidarity and the welfare state, and should, therefore, be curtailed.
As the incarnation of liberal-minded intellectualism, Mr Goodhart was very obviously not a racist. Yet to many people in London’s political and literary elites, he had put himself beyond the pale.
Not only did his expected invitation to the Hay Literary Festival not materialise, but there were howls of protest when his book was shortlisted for the Orwell Prize for political writing. This will surely strike a chord with many Ukip supporters, who, for the past few weeks, have been dismissed as a gaggle of lunatics, losers and would-be Nazis.
Perhaps I should say, by the way, that I am very far from being a Ukip supporter and almost certainly never will be.
The party’s manifesto seems to me largely fantastical, and the thought of its representatives running our nation’s schools and hospitals fills me with dread.
Yet I was shocked by the sanctimonious, patronising coverage in much of the London media. Indeed, reading some columnists, as well as listening to most of our current MPs, it was hard to miss the stench of social and cultural snobbery.

As the maverick Left-wing writer John Harris remarked yesterday, there was ‘a collective outbreak of sneering, which started to transcend the party itself and blur into a generalised mockery of anyone minded to support it’.
On Twitter, a BBC News channel editor, Jasmine Lawrence, declared that Ukip appealed only to ‘white, middle-class, middle-aged men with sexist/racist views’.
And others were little better. Almost incredibly, one Evening Standard columnist, after insisting that Ukip was a ‘racist party’, declared that it was ‘left to Londoners to speak for the nation’.
The truth, of course, is that Londoners spend rather too much time speaking for the nation. That is part of the problem.
Too often our self-regarding political classes forget that in reality (as opposed to their Westminster bubble), most of us do not live in London and are sick of having to endure the condescending jibes of those who do.
As Ukip’s Cheltenham branch chairman, Christina Simmonds, remarked yesterday: ‘They patronise us and try to make out we don’t know what we’re talking about just because they don’t agree with us. But what we’re saying is making sense to good, ordinary people.’
So where do we go from here?
It seems certain that tomorrow night’s European results will bring more good news for Mr Farage, and it seems highly implausible that his support will melt away, like the snows in spring, in time for next year’s General Election.

For Ed Miliband, the elections have been a wretched embarrassment. As the Labour MP John Mann rightly remarked, the ‘pointy-heads’ at the top of his party seem to have no idea of the pressures facing their working-class voters, while Mr Miliband’s student-union socialism has conspicuously failed to arouse public enthusiasm.
For David Cameron, though, the Ukip challenge seems even more urgent. Ever since becoming Tory leader in 2005, the PM has been determined to dismiss and patronise Ukip’s supporters, even calling them ‘loonies, fruitcakes and closet racists’.
Far from reaching out to them, Mr Cameron has effectively pretended that Ukip’s supporters do not exist.
That strategy has comprehensively failed; indeed, it is Mr Cameron’s condescending, lord-of-the-manor approach that has driven so many working-class and lower-middle-class Tories into Nigel Farage’s embrace.
It now seems very plausible that Ukip will pick up at least 10 per cent of the vote at next year’s General Election. In many parts of Britain, especially Southern England, there will almost certainly be a comfortable centre-right majority.
But that majority will be divided. And unless there is a stunning collapse in Ukip’s vote, they will surely cost the Tories several seats, perhaps even dozens, next May — thereby putting Ed Miliband into Downing Street.
Mr Cameron has always resisted the idea of an electoral pact with Ukip. But I wonder if he is now rethinking his position.
The Tories, after all, have a long history of election-winning pacts. In the late-Victorian period they governed in alliance with Joseph Chamberlain’s Liberal Unionists; in 1918 they organised a slate with David Lloyd George’s Liberals; and in the 1930s they formed an alliance with Ramsay MacDonald’s renegade National Labour party and Sir John Simon’s National Liberals.
A pact with Ukip would not, therefore, be unprecedented. It would certainly be risky. But since Mr Cameron may well decide that it offers the only chance of retaining the keys to No 10, I would not be surprised to see him change his mind.
At the very least, Mr Cameron has to find a way of speaking to those parts of Britain — unsung, ordinary, provincial working-class and lower-middle-class towns up and down the country — that he has so far failed to reach.
If he fails, then this time next year he will be looking for a new job. That ought to focus his mind.
I'm sorry, but you are so verbose that it would exhaust me to try to read all of your letter.
Could you re-write it as a synopsis.
"His policies fill me with dread"....so you vote for his policies.
Sounds eminently sensible to me!
Using 2 user names again eh. The article from another paper stated this headline. If glad to have left why come back....
[quote][p][bold]Puffin-Billy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]glad to haveleft[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]itsnotthatbad[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Puffin-Billy[/bold] wrote: By voting for UKIP you have voted for a party which, through its membership of the EFD officially supports: Fascism, Racism, Homophobia, and Misogyny. You have legitimised, and officially welcomed Fascism, Racism, Homophobia, and Misogyny into Bolton Town Hall. You have given them respectability, and they are now officially sanctioned, free to stalk the streets of Bolton. By voting for Fascism, Racism, Homophobia, and Misogyny, you have insulted the memory of the fallen of the First and Second World Wars. .....From Wilfred Owen's Futility: "Was it for this the clay grew tall? —O what made fatuous sunbeams toil To break earth’s sleep at all?" .....Inscription on Bolton Cenotaph: “Tell ye your children our brothers died to win a better World our part must be to strive for truth goodwill and peace that their sacrifice be not in vain” .[/p][/quote]Hello again Mr.A this is why I voted UKIP. I would never dream of voting for them in the full on elections, but this piece of news here hits the nail right on the head and is exactly how I feel. His policies fill me with dread. But this is what you get when a smug metropolitan elite treat the people with contempt Nobody can say it hasn’t been coming. Yet as the local election results filtered through yesterday morning, there was a palpable sense of shock inside Britain’s political establishment, which had spent weeks writing off Nigel Farage and his motley band of grassroots insurgents. ‘The Ukip fox,’ Mr Farage said delightedly yesterday, ‘is in the Westminster hen house.’ That is putting it mildly — not least since the results in the European elections, which will not be counted until tomorrow, are expected to be even better for Ukip. To get a sense of how far Mr Farage’s party has come, consider this. In the 2010 General Election, Ukip won just 3 per cent of the vote. It does not have a single MP, its last election manifesto was wildly incoherent and, with the exception of the ebullient Mr Farage, its representatives are utterly obscure. Yet for the second consecutive year, Ukip has won around a fifth of the national vote. Defying all the predictions, it has gained more than 100 council seats. In Essex, it denied the Tories victory in Basildon, Castle Point and Southend. And in Rotherham, supposedly a working-class Labour bastion, its candidates averaged a whopping 47 per cent of the vote. By any standards this represents a political earthquake. Since the 1930s, British politics has essentially been a two-and-a-half-party system, with the Tories and Labour monopolising the dance floor and the Lib Dems, in their various forms, lurking half-heartedly on the fringes. What is now clear is that those days are finished. Neither David Cameron nor Ed Miliband has the slightest hope of winning as much as 40 per cent of the vote at the next General Election. And given Ukip’s performance over the past few years, it would be a brave man who would bet against them picking up at least 10 per cent of the vote — and maybe more — in May 2015. The really extraordinary thing is that this has been the achievement of one man. Who would have believed that the outspoken Nigel Farage, a privately-educated former City trader who has never won a Westminster seat, would inspire such enthusiasm among ordinary voters from the housing estates of Essex to the post-industrial towns of South Yorkshire? ‘When he walked on to the stage in Portsmouth,’ wrote one reporter in last week’s Spectator magazine, ‘the crowd rose for him with a fervour I’ve never witnessed at a mainstream party conference.’ There is, of course, an obvious explanation. What Mr Farage has tapped into is a widespread national discontent that cannot merely be dismissed — as some metropolitan commentators have tried to do — as racism or xenophobia. Ukip was founded in 1993 as an obscure anti-federalist pressure group. For years it struggled to gain attention. Mr Farage’s tactical genius was to turn it into a populist anti-Establishment party, articulating deep-seated public anxieties about the two great taboos of modern political debate: Europe and immigration. In many corners of the media, as well as in Westminster itself, both of these issues are regarded as toxic. Yet by ignoring them, the politicians have simply handed them to Mr Farage. In the few days before Thursday’s elections, most of the coverage hinged on immigration. When an exhausted Mr Farage said he would not want Romanians to move in next door to him, many commentators declared that he had committed an unforgivable gaffe which would poison his national reputation and destroy his support overnight. I was reminded, however, of an interview Margaret Thatcher gave during a by-election campaign in Ilford in 1978, when she remarked that people were frightened of being ‘swamped’ by immigrants. Like Mr Farage, she was seen as having committed a dreadful error. However, the supposed gaffe struck a chord, and the Tories promptly romped to victory. The truth is that the immigration issue has been simmering unhealthily away for at least 40 years. As early as the late-1960s, polls showed that among young and old alike, mass immigration was by far the most unpopular development of the decade. Among Britain’s politicians, however, immigration has always been the ultimate taboo. When Enoch Powell spoke out in 1968, he was roundly condemned and thrown off the Tory front bench. Yet, whatever you or I might think of Powell’s famous ‘Rivers of Blood’ speech (a line he never actually used), a Gallup poll at the time found that 74 per cent of people agreed with him, while only 15 per cent disagreed. Then as now, in other words, there was a wide gulf between what people thought at Westminster and what people thought in the rest of the country. Writing a few days after the speech, the Guardian’s star columnist Peter Jenkins dismissed arguments that Powell and his admirers were merely racist. What motivated them, Jenkins wrote, was the feeling that ‘the politicians are conspiring against the people, that the country is led by men who have no idea about what interests or frightens the ordinary people in the back streets of Wolverhampton’. That sounds pretty familiar to me. Some of Mr Farage’s supporters may, indeed, be racially prejudiced, and certainly one or two of his councillors have some jaw-dropping medieval opinions. But I think there is much more to it than the prejudices of a minority. For decades, surveys have shown that millions of ordinary people dislike the European Union and are alarmed by the influx of so many newcomers, especially in working-class towns struggling to cope with the decline of industry and the rise of unemployment. Contrary to what the sneering metropolitan commentators like to think, the vast majority of these people are not racists. What worries them is the evaporation of jobs which are going overseas, the stagnation of real wages, the shortage of decent housing, the overcrowding of primary schools and the rising pressure on hospital wards and A&E departments. Britain’s political and media classes, however, have shown themselves almost entirely uninterested — and for depressingly obvious reasons. Most British politicians inhabit a gilded bubble. They are often born into comfortable households, go to private schools (or elite comprehensives) and then spend three years at Oxford or Cambridge before becoming political researchers, special advisers and MPs. Well-heeled politicians such as David Cameron, Ed Miliband and Nick Clegg, like their friends and allies in the liberal media, see only the benefits of European membership and the unfettered movement of labour. To them, immigration means cheaper au pairs, cleaners and builders. Because they rarely see the world outside Westminster, except on flying visits to their constituencies, they have no sense of the anxiety in working-class communities and are quick to condemn anybody who violates their shared taboo. One example tells a wider story. Last year, the former editor of Prospect magazine, David Goodhart, published a book (serialised in the Mail), arguing that immigration was undermining national solidarity and the welfare state, and should, therefore, be curtailed. As the incarnation of liberal-minded intellectualism, Mr Goodhart was very obviously not a racist. Yet to many people in London’s political and literary elites, he had put himself beyond the pale. Not only did his expected invitation to the Hay Literary Festival not materialise, but there were howls of protest when his book was shortlisted for the Orwell Prize for political writing. This will surely strike a chord with many Ukip supporters, who, for the past few weeks, have been dismissed as a gaggle of lunatics, losers and would-be Nazis. Perhaps I should say, by the way, that I am very far from being a Ukip supporter and almost certainly never will be. The party’s manifesto seems to me largely fantastical, and the thought of its representatives running our nation’s schools and hospitals fills me with dread. Yet I was shocked by the sanctimonious, patronising coverage in much of the London media. Indeed, reading some columnists, as well as listening to most of our current MPs, it was hard to miss the stench of social and cultural snobbery. As the maverick Left-wing writer John Harris remarked yesterday, there was ‘a collective outbreak of sneering, which started to transcend the party itself and blur into a generalised mockery of anyone minded to support it’. On Twitter, a BBC News channel editor, Jasmine Lawrence, declared that Ukip appealed only to ‘white, middle-class, middle-aged men with sexist/racist views’. And others were little better. Almost incredibly, one Evening Standard columnist, after insisting that Ukip was a ‘racist party’, declared that it was ‘left to Londoners to speak for the nation’. The truth, of course, is that Londoners spend rather too much time speaking for the nation. That is part of the problem. Too often our self-regarding political classes forget that in reality (as opposed to their Westminster bubble), most of us do not live in London and are sick of having to endure the condescending jibes of those who do. As Ukip’s Cheltenham branch chairman, Christina Simmonds, remarked yesterday: ‘They patronise us and try to make out we don’t know what we’re talking about just because they don’t agree with us. But what we’re saying is making sense to good, ordinary people.’ So where do we go from here? It seems certain that tomorrow night’s European results will bring more good news for Mr Farage, and it seems highly implausible that his support will melt away, like the snows in spring, in time for next year’s General Election. For Ed Miliband, the elections have been a wretched embarrassment. As the Labour MP John Mann rightly remarked, the ‘pointy-heads’ at the top of his party seem to have no idea of the pressures facing their working-class voters, while Mr Miliband’s student-union socialism has conspicuously failed to arouse public enthusiasm. For David Cameron, though, the Ukip challenge seems even more urgent. Ever since becoming Tory leader in 2005, the PM has been determined to dismiss and patronise Ukip’s supporters, even calling them ‘loonies, fruitcakes and closet racists’. Far from reaching out to them, Mr Cameron has effectively pretended that Ukip’s supporters do not exist. That strategy has comprehensively failed; indeed, it is Mr Cameron’s condescending, lord-of-the-manor approach that has driven so many working-class and lower-middle-class Tories into Nigel Farage’s embrace. It now seems very plausible that Ukip will pick up at least 10 per cent of the vote at next year’s General Election. In many parts of Britain, especially Southern England, there will almost certainly be a comfortable centre-right majority. But that majority will be divided. And unless there is a stunning collapse in Ukip’s vote, they will surely cost the Tories several seats, perhaps even dozens, next May — thereby putting Ed Miliband into Downing Street. Mr Cameron has always resisted the idea of an electoral pact with Ukip. But I wonder if he is now rethinking his position. The Tories, after all, have a long history of election-winning pacts. In the late-Victorian period they governed in alliance with Joseph Chamberlain’s Liberal Unionists; in 1918 they organised a slate with David Lloyd George’s Liberals; and in the 1930s they formed an alliance with Ramsay MacDonald’s renegade National Labour party and Sir John Simon’s National Liberals. A pact with Ukip would not, therefore, be unprecedented. It would certainly be risky. But since Mr Cameron may well decide that it offers the only chance of retaining the keys to No 10, I would not be surprised to see him change his mind. At the very least, Mr Cameron has to find a way of speaking to those parts of Britain — unsung, ordinary, provincial working-class and lower-middle-class towns up and down the country — that he has so far failed to reach. If he fails, then this time next year he will be looking for a new job. That ought to focus his mind.[/p][/quote]I'm sorry, but you are so verbose that it would exhaust me to try to read all of your letter. Could you re-write it as a synopsis.[/p][/quote]"His policies fill me with dread"....so you vote for his policies. Sounds eminently sensible to me![/p][/quote]Using 2 user names again eh. The article from another paper stated this headline. If glad to have left why come back.... itsnotthatbad
  • Score: 6

12:35pm Sat 24 May 14

notgonehome says...

I cannot say support the UKIP party but my wife who is from Singapore thinks they are the best thing since sliced bread very strange that.
I cannot say support the UKIP party but my wife who is from Singapore thinks they are the best thing since sliced bread very strange that. notgonehome
  • Score: 16

3:50pm Sat 24 May 14

OriginalAngryDad says...

dystop wrote:
OriginalAngryDad wrote:
zoomzam wrote:
Sadly these racists have started encroaching into Bolton....and they think by closing doors they will help the working classes??? Clueless!
I take it that you referring to Bolton's Muslim population, because a more inherently racist bunch you will not find.....

Sadly, I fear it's too late, as they already hold considerable sway in local politics.

Try voting UKIP next time........you never know.........
Muslim isn't a race.

And what evidence do you have for the group you're talking about being racist? I'm asking because you haven't provided any.
I grew up in Halliwell, so I know of what I speak.

And where did I say Muslim was a race?
[quote][p][bold]dystop[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]OriginalAngryDad[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]zoomzam[/bold] wrote: Sadly these racists have started encroaching into Bolton....and they think by closing doors they will help the working classes??? Clueless![/p][/quote]I take it that you referring to Bolton's Muslim population, because a more inherently racist bunch you will not find..... Sadly, I fear it's too late, as they already hold considerable sway in local politics. Try voting UKIP next time........you never know.........[/p][/quote]Muslim isn't a race. And what evidence do you have for the group you're talking about being racist? I'm asking because you haven't provided any.[/p][/quote]I grew up in Halliwell, so I know of what I speak. And where did I say Muslim was a race? OriginalAngryDad
  • Score: 8

9:03am Sun 25 May 14

StGibbs says...

dystop wrote:
"Grandfather-of
-17 and retired musician Mr Richardson, aged 68, said he and Ms Parkinson were committed to improving the whole of Bolton for its residents — and using their new-found positions to launch UKIP’s bid for a parliamentary seat in Bolton in 2015."

Mr Richardson's campaign made the point of "not being anything to do with national politics". Now he's using the new-found positions to launch a bid for a seat in national politics? That was a fast turn-around.
Did anyone see Richardson interviewed on BBC North West Tonight following the results?

Can't find the clip right now - would love to see it again if anyone has it - but I'm sure it went along these lines:
he was asked about UKIP's economic policies, and couldn't give a coherent answer. The interviewer couldn't believe it, and it really sounded as though he had to stop himself laughing out loud.
Awkward moments, eventually Richardson said something about sharing out "the money" equally.

Yes, I think we'd all support that.
but... sounds a bit erm, communist, as well as not very well thought out.

Congrats on your your win, Mr Richardson, but you need to do more homework before standing for MP.
[quote][p][bold]dystop[/bold] wrote: "Grandfather-of -17 and retired musician Mr Richardson, aged 68, said he and Ms Parkinson were committed to improving the whole of Bolton for its residents — and using their new-found positions to launch UKIP’s bid for a parliamentary seat in Bolton in 2015." Mr Richardson's campaign made the point of "not being anything to do with national politics". Now he's using the new-found positions to launch a bid for a seat in national politics? That was a fast turn-around.[/p][/quote]Did anyone see Richardson interviewed on BBC North West Tonight following the results? Can't find the clip right now - would love to see it again if anyone has it - but I'm sure it went along these lines: he was asked about UKIP's economic policies, and couldn't give a coherent answer. The interviewer couldn't believe it, and it really sounded as though he had to stop himself laughing out loud. Awkward moments, eventually Richardson said something about sharing out "the money" equally. Yes, I think we'd all support that. but... sounds a bit erm, communist, as well as not very well thought out. Congrats on your your win, Mr Richardson, but you need to do more homework before standing for MP. StGibbs
  • Score: -2

9:19am Sun 25 May 14

By George says...

These two ukip plants will soon wither away as they are trampled on by the system, nick peel is good at that
These two ukip plants will soon wither away as they are trampled on by the system, nick peel is good at that By George
  • Score: -10

12:02pm Mon 26 May 14

Greasy Chip Butty says...

A couple of paper candidates who are now surprised to be councillors.
Hopefully they will disappear when the bubble bursts.
A couple of paper candidates who are now surprised to be councillors. Hopefully they will disappear when the bubble bursts. Greasy Chip Butty
  • Score: -7

12:44pm Mon 26 May 14

Rivertin says...

I am not one for conspiracy theories but I am sure UKIP are a very intelligent group of mature students that are carrying out something called ' The Gullibility Experiiment '

(also I think Farage's rubbery mask has malfunctioned somewhere, maybe he would be better off exposing his lizard face, I may vote for him then)
I am not one for conspiracy theories but I am sure UKIP are a very intelligent group of mature students that are carrying out something called ' The Gullibility Experiiment ' (also I think Farage's rubbery mask has malfunctioned somewhere, maybe he would be better off exposing his lizard face, I may vote for him then) Rivertin
  • Score: -9

6:08pm Mon 26 May 14

Old Boltonian says...

Two more good reasons to be ashamed of Bolton.
Two more good reasons to be ashamed of Bolton. Old Boltonian
  • Score: -7

6:11pm Mon 26 May 14

Old Boltonian says...

Send in the clowns.
Send in the clowns. Old Boltonian
  • Score: -9

7:33pm Mon 26 May 14

Randolf Litler !!! says...

Old Boltonian wrote:
Send in the clowns.
The clowns have already been in power years by allowing uncontrolled immigration for decades turning bolton and many other towns in the north west to be over run and be decimated.
[quote][p][bold]Old Boltonian[/bold] wrote: Send in the clowns.[/p][/quote]The clowns have already been in power years by allowing uncontrolled immigration for decades turning bolton and many other towns in the north west to be over run and be decimated. Randolf Litler !!!
  • Score: 9

8:45pm Mon 26 May 14

Randolf Litler !!! says...

If it hadn't been for the failure of previous governments over the decades to address the problem and control immigration into this country then UKIP would never had come into existence but thankfully they are now here.
Between 1997 and 2010 labour belatedly apologised for their disastrous open door policy into this country which allowed 3.2 millionn into the uk, among of which were criminals, murderers, rapists, etc,etc, not to mention the benefit fraudsters and increased demand on our public sevices, so you see this is why we have UKIP today.
The majority of these around daubhill are a drain on our society, as i fail to see how all these walking around our streets all day can have any positive effect on our economy...so i'm only too willing to see them all back where they came from over the last 30 years to the present day.
If it hadn't been for the failure of previous governments over the decades to address the problem and control immigration into this country then UKIP would never had come into existence but thankfully they are now here. Between 1997 and 2010 labour belatedly apologised for their disastrous open door policy into this country which allowed 3.2 millionn into the uk, among of which were criminals, murderers, rapists, etc,etc, not to mention the benefit fraudsters and increased demand on our public sevices, so you see this is why we have UKIP today. The majority of these around daubhill are a drain on our society, as i fail to see how all these walking around our streets all day can have any positive effect on our economy...so i'm only too willing to see them all back where they came from over the last 30 years to the present day. Randolf Litler !!!
  • Score: 6

4:50pm Wed 28 May 14

ReginaldLong says...

dystop wrote:
BibbleBobble wrote:
“We want to work towards increasing the types of shops that are in the town centre, beyond pawn and charity shops."

Very well said. Our once beautiful town centre is a mere shadow of its former glory. But do you know it's taken the Labour run Council a long time and required lot of effort to take it to such depths?
The town centre reflects the national economic crisis, not local policy. Investment has waned because of our national crippling debt. But shutting ourselves off from the EU limits the tree movement of trade and capital, which would make our economic situation worse.

UKIP constantly cite the "£55m a day to the EU" and "too much being spent on foreign aid". But those are drops in the ocean if you look at the big picture. Pensions alone is about £72 BILLION a year.
Yes let us stop the pensions and pump that £72 BILLION a year into Africa to save the starving children yeah?
We need to look after BRITAIN before anywhere else, closing the doors will in itself create more jobs as employers will be forced to hire British people, First Buses actively advertised in Poland offering shelter, education, jobs and good salary but us Brits have to fight over a minimum wage job? Where is the logic in that?
[quote][p][bold]dystop[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]BibbleBobble[/bold] wrote: “We want to work towards increasing the types of shops that are in the town centre, beyond pawn and charity shops." Very well said. Our once beautiful town centre is a mere shadow of its former glory. But do you know it's taken the Labour run Council a long time and required lot of effort to take it to such depths?[/p][/quote]The town centre reflects the national economic crisis, not local policy. Investment has waned because of our national crippling debt. But shutting ourselves off from the EU limits the tree movement of trade and capital, which would make our economic situation worse. UKIP constantly cite the "£55m a day to the EU" and "too much being spent on foreign aid". But those are drops in the ocean if you look at the big picture. Pensions alone is about £72 BILLION a year.[/p][/quote]Yes let us stop the pensions and pump that £72 BILLION a year into Africa to save the starving children yeah? We need to look after BRITAIN before anywhere else, closing the doors will in itself create more jobs as employers will be forced to hire British people, First Buses actively advertised in Poland offering shelter, education, jobs and good salary but us Brits have to fight over a minimum wage job? Where is the logic in that? ReginaldLong
  • Score: 2

6:34pm Sat 21 Jun 14

Bluesytuesday says...

zoomzam wrote:
Sadly these racists have started encroaching into Bolton....and they think by closing doors they will help the working classes??? Clueless!
Clueless indeed, absolutely.
[quote][p][bold]zoomzam[/bold] wrote: Sadly these racists have started encroaching into Bolton....and they think by closing doors they will help the working classes??? Clueless![/p][/quote]Clueless indeed, absolutely. Bluesytuesday
  • Score: -1

6:36pm Sat 21 Jun 14

Bluesytuesday says...

Liamdog wrote:
About time, this country may finally be waking up to the loss of our heritage , culture, and way of life. Ukip are the only party standing up for the average uk citizen.
If you believe that you obviously believe in fairies.
[quote][p][bold]Liamdog[/bold] wrote: About time, this country may finally be waking up to the loss of our heritage , culture, and way of life. Ukip are the only party standing up for the average uk citizen.[/p][/quote]If you believe that you obviously believe in fairies. Bluesytuesday
  • Score: -1

6:37pm Sat 21 Jun 14

Bluesytuesday says...

Puffin-Billy wrote:
UKIP Cllr Diane Parkinson, who represents the people of Hulton in Bolton, admires UKIP and all that they stand for; and she gives her full support to Nigel Farage, the leader of UKIP.

Is she and the people of Hulton aware that Nigel Farage is co-President with Francesco Speroni, of a far right European group of parties?

Is Cllr Parkinson aware that UKIP is a member of a group called Europe of Freedom and Democracy (EFD) ?

Are Cllr Parkinson and her supporters aware that the EFD is composed of the Danish People’s Party, the True Finns Party, the Dutch SGP and the Italian Lega Nord - and that Francesco Speroni, a leading member of the Northern League, has maintained that the Norwegian mass murderer Anders Behring Breivik's ideas are "...in defence of western civilisation." ?

Does Cllr Parkinson, and do her supporters agree with Speroni?

Is Cllr Parkinson aware that Mario Borghezio of the EFD, has said in a radio interview that Breivik had some "excellent" ideas? Does Diane Parkinson agree with Borghezio?

Is Cllr Parkinson aware that Borghezio also pronounced on radio: "Long live the Whites of Europe, long live our identity, our ethnicity, our race… our blue sky, like the eyes of our women. Blue, in a people who want to stay white."? Does she agree with him?

Does Cllr Parkinson not question why the person she admires so much, Nigel Farage, continues to co-preside over the EFD along with the leader of Lega Nord ?

Does Cllr Parkinson not question why MEP Nikki Sinclaire has been expelled from Ukip? She was in fact expelled for refusing to take part in the EFD because of their “extreme views”. Is Diane Parkinson not worried by this fact?

Is Cllr Parkinson aware that Ukip’s only female MEP, Marta Andreasen, has threatened to leave the party, labelling Farage as an “anti-women Stalinist dictator” whose view is that “women should be in the kitchen or in the bedroom”. Does Diane Parkinson agree with Andreasen?

Is Cllr Parkinson aware that Olly Neville, the former UKIP Youth Chairman, has been sacked for supporting same-sex marriage - does she agree that Neville should have been sacked?
Very interesting and intelligent questions, which appear to have gone over the heads of those who voted against you, but then I imagine it was an organised mass down voting of what you said, typical of the cowards.
[quote][p][bold]Puffin-Billy[/bold] wrote: UKIP Cllr Diane Parkinson, who represents the people of Hulton in Bolton, admires UKIP and all that they stand for; and she gives her full support to Nigel Farage, the leader of UKIP. Is she and the people of Hulton aware that Nigel Farage is co-President with Francesco Speroni, of a far right European group of parties? Is Cllr Parkinson aware that UKIP is a member of a group called Europe of Freedom and Democracy (EFD) ? Are Cllr Parkinson and her supporters aware that the EFD is composed of the Danish People’s Party, the True Finns Party, the Dutch SGP and the Italian Lega Nord - and that Francesco Speroni, a leading member of the Northern League, has maintained that the Norwegian mass murderer Anders Behring Breivik's ideas are "...in defence of western civilisation." ? Does Cllr Parkinson, and do her supporters agree with Speroni? Is Cllr Parkinson aware that Mario Borghezio of the EFD, has said in a radio interview that Breivik had some "excellent" ideas? Does Diane Parkinson agree with Borghezio? Is Cllr Parkinson aware that Borghezio also pronounced on radio: "Long live the Whites of Europe, long live our identity, our ethnicity, our race… our blue sky, like the eyes of our women. Blue, in a people who want to stay white."? Does she agree with him? Does Cllr Parkinson not question why the person she admires so much, Nigel Farage, continues to co-preside over the EFD along with the leader of Lega Nord ? Does Cllr Parkinson not question why MEP Nikki Sinclaire has been expelled from Ukip? She was in fact expelled for refusing to take part in the EFD because of their “extreme views”. Is Diane Parkinson not worried by this fact? Is Cllr Parkinson aware that Ukip’s only female MEP, Marta Andreasen, has threatened to leave the party, labelling Farage as an “anti-women Stalinist dictator” whose view is that “women should be in the kitchen or in the bedroom”. Does Diane Parkinson agree with Andreasen? Is Cllr Parkinson aware that Olly Neville, the former UKIP Youth Chairman, has been sacked for supporting same-sex marriage - does she agree that Neville should have been sacked?[/p][/quote]Very interesting and intelligent questions, which appear to have gone over the heads of those who voted against you, but then I imagine it was an organised mass down voting of what you said, typical of the cowards. Bluesytuesday
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