Secret documents could be revealed about 'government cover-up' over pregnancy drug

Secret documents could be revealed about 'government cover-up' over pregnancy drug

Yasmin Qureshi

David Cameron

First published in News The Bolton News: Photograph of the Author by , health reporter

DOCUMENTS relating to controversial pregnancy testing drug Primodos could be revealed by the government, following a campaign by an MP.

Bolton South East MP Yasmin Qureshi has now met with Prime Minister David Cameron to discuss a potential government cover-up of warnings about the drug.

The drug was produced by Schering — a German company later taken over by Bayer — and was given to women in the UK by GPs in the 1960s and 1970s as a pregnancy test.

Little Lever mum Nichola Williams claims Primodos caused her and other victims congenital health problems — prompting Ms Qureshi’s campaign for a public inquiry.

The victims have already obtained government documents containing letters from doctors about the drug under the 30-year-rule.

But the MP says there could be more letters kept under lock and key.

Mr Cameron has now agreed to look for any relevant documents that have been held back from the public.

Ms Qureshi said: “Mr Cameron’s initial questions were whether there was any evidence that Primodos had caused deformities in children.

“I talked him through the latest research and studies that show there is a link between women who took the drug and children born with deformities. The Prime Minister said he would do two things.

“First, he said he would speak to his scientific officer to look at the cases and whether anything about Primodos was overlooked at the time.

“Second, we think there may be documents being held back from the public. He said he will find out if there are any relevant documents.

“There is a lot more work to be done but I am not going to stop trying to get justice for these victims.”

Ms Qureshi has led the fight for a public inquiry and has formed an all-party parliamentary group to “bring justice” for the alleged victims.

She has also applied to the backbench business committee for a debate on Primodos in the main parliamentary chamber.

Ms Williams and fellow campaigners claim the drug caused deformities in children — claims the drug company has always denied.

Ms Williams, aged 42, says she has uncovered further evidence that the government was warned about the dangers of pregnancy testing drugs as far back as 1967.

Comments

Comments are closed on this article.

Send us your news, pictures and videos

Most read stories

Local Info

Enter your postcode, town or place name

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree