Edgworth pupils go back in time to World War One

Edgworth pupils go back in time to World War One

Tom Jenkenson, aged 10, dressed as a British soldier.

Heather Newman, aged 11, and Aneurin Walsh, aged 10, as German officers.

Josh Balshaw and Marco Melia, both aged 11, and Jake Green, aged 10, took part in a game of football, like troops from both sides involved in the war at Christmas 1914

First published in News The Bolton News: Photograph of the Author by , education reporter

YOUNG historians embarked on a poignant journey to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the outbreak of World War One.

Pupils at Turton and Edgworth CE and Methodist Primary School have been exploring the legacy of the war on their village.

They examined historical documents such as letters, diaries, photos, newspaper articles and memorabilia loaned to them by locals to understand why the war started, life on the front line, the weapons and technology used, life on the home front and the contribution women made to the war effort.

They found out how the war affected individuals and families living in the village at the time, visiting war memorials and church graveyards.

Governor Sandra Glancy said: “They have also been helped and supported by villagers committed to the commemoration project — some of whom have gone into school to talk to them about the numerous remembrance events taking place, and the nature of the extensive local research being undertaken.

“The researchers have kindly shared the fruits of their labour and Years Five and Six have benefited from making use of the emerging biographies of many of the 300 or so local combatants.”

Highlight of their research included inviting villagers into school to experience life in wartime Turton and Edgworth when the pupils staged a production dramatising the effect the war had in the community, and on individuals and families.

They performed drama and dance pieces, sang songs, showing photos and reading extracts from soldiers’ letters.

And during the interval, the refreshments were “maconchie’s” stew and Anzac biscuits, which would have been served during the era.

Mrs Glancy said: “The commemoration project in Turton and Edgworth is much more than the remembrance of a distant event. It has taken on a momentum of its own.

"It is nurturing a unique and very special community spirit, and looks set to run for the next four years — the duration of the war.”

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