'A modern day miracle' - 25,000 free picnic lunches for Bolton's poorest children

'A modern day miracle' - 25,000 free picnic lunches for Bolton's poorest children

Annabelle Unsworth, aged four, helps fill some of the lunch bags

Stacks of food waiting to be handed out to children

Volunteers on the cheese sandwich production line

First published in News
Last updated
The Bolton News: Photograph of the Author Exclusive by , Reporter

AN AMBITIOUS project has been launched to feed Bolton’s poorest children with 25,000 meals over the summer holidays.

Inspired by the story of Jesus feeding the 5,000, charity Urban Outreach is so concerned about children going hungry during the long summer break that it is mobilising an army of volunteers to make and distribute 1,000 picnic lunches around the borough every weekday.

Urban Outreach chief executive Dave Bagley said: “It is going to be the biggest picnic in the history of Bolton.”

The project, named BL14 Lunch, has been put together in just a few weeks as a response to concerns about what happens to the 9,000 children in Bolton who are eligible for free school meals once they are on holiday.

Urban Outreach believes this could be vital to many struggling Bolton parents.

Mr Bagley, who is also a qualified chef, said: “We have taken a bit of a risk on it. The operation is going to cost in the region of £25,000.

"We don’t really know what will happen. It is a bit of a fishing trip because no-one has done it before.

“It would be great if we found it wasn’t needed and we were over-reacting, but if we manage to get it right and 25,000 bellies are filled then it will be a very worthwhile exercise.”

The project has taken over the former Allied Carpet shop at Trinity Retail Park between 7.30am and 9am each week day when 30 volunteers will make halal, meat and vegetarian sandwiches.

These will then be put into bags along with Cheddars, an apple, a cereal bar and drink.

A chilled van will then distribute the meals to a dozen children’s centres around the borough.

Children will be able to walk in and request a meal. No proof of entitlement to free school meals will be needed.

Mr Bagley said: “The idea is that we not only get food to kids, but it is also about summer and it being a fun time.”

“This has never been done before and the encouragement, I feel, has come from Jesus feeding the 5,000,” added Mr Bagley, who believes the mass picnic can be Bolton’s own modern day miracle.”

Rt Rev Chris Edmondson, Bishop of Bolton, said: “It’s a brilliant, albeit challenging, initiative to find the £25,000.

“Normally children would be having free school meals and it’s an expression of Christian faith to make sure that kids are not going hungry during the summer holidays.

“My hope and prayer is that people of Bolton will be able to support it both financially or through practical help.

“I think it’s an example of being part of the Bolton family. If family really means family then I hope that people will say ‘I could make a contribution’.

“I’m totally enthusiastic and supportive of this.”

Urban Outreach also operates as a mobile food bank around Bolton, delivering food to the town’s most needy families.

Last year, food banks in Bolton fed more than 10,000 people just six months.

An average of 1,970 people used food bank vouchers every month.

Urban Outreach is still looking for donations towards the cost of the scheme and volunteers to help make the lunches.

Anyone who can help can call 01204 385848 or e-mail winterwatch@urbanoutreach.co.uk.

The locations of the free picnic lunches are:

  • Horwich and Blackrod Childrens Centre, Horwich Library, Jones Street
  • Westhoughton Childrens Centre, Clough Avenue
  • The Orchards Children's Centre, Highfield Road
  • Kearsley Childrens Centre, Springfield Road
  • Great Lever Childrens Centre, Leonard Street
  • Little Lever Children Centre, Herbert Street
  • Bright Meadows Children Centre, Greenroyd Ave
  • Oxford Grove Childrens Centre, Shepherd Cross St
  • Crompton Children's Centre, Chalfont Street
  • Tonge Childrens Centre, Starkie Road
  • Oldham's Children Centre, Forfar Street
  • Heaton and Lostock Neighbourhood Children’s Centre, New Hall Lane

Comments (16)

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8:37am Thu 31 Jul 14

marco999 says...

While the idea of this project is a thoroughly admirable one and should be applauded, I have to ask, are there really this many children in our borough who are going hungry and are in need of food handouts? There have always been poor kids; I was in fact a poor kid back in the 70’s, one of six who existed on hand me downs and charity handouts while my parents worked and never claimed benefits but despite our poverty we never ever missed a meal. I really can’t believe that now in the 21st century there are parents so poor that they can’t afford to feed their children. If necessary I could feed myself quite adequately for a couple of pounds per day or less so I can’t understand why these so called poor parents are relying on charitable handouts for their children. I see single parents all the time and they all have a house, all the toys their kids could ever want, designer clothing, a 50 inch TV, booze – you name it, so where are all these ultra poor kids who need food handouts actually coming from?
While the idea of this project is a thoroughly admirable one and should be applauded, I have to ask, are there really this many children in our borough who are going hungry and are in need of food handouts? There have always been poor kids; I was in fact a poor kid back in the 70’s, one of six who existed on hand me downs and charity handouts while my parents worked and never claimed benefits but despite our poverty we never ever missed a meal. I really can’t believe that now in the 21st century there are parents so poor that they can’t afford to feed their children. If necessary I could feed myself quite adequately for a couple of pounds per day or less so I can’t understand why these so called poor parents are relying on charitable handouts for their children. I see single parents all the time and they all have a house, all the toys their kids could ever want, designer clothing, a 50 inch TV, booze – you name it, so where are all these ultra poor kids who need food handouts actually coming from? marco999
  • Score: 17

8:57am Thu 31 Jul 14

Citizen Cane says...

Marco - it is misinformation. Generating children whilst on benefits or low income is well known as a great way to take money off hard-working taxpayers, get access to social housing and have a meal ticket for a good 16/18 years for each one. Just look at the number of large "families", preferably single parent with no visible means of support. Even better, you can plead poverty and the cringeing liberals and gullible press simply lap it up.

The other problem is that many of these ATM kids are from a low quality gene pool with inadequate parental care and are essentially apprentice criminals.

It's the childless single people on benefits who have it really hard - no lunch bags for them seemingly? Jesus would see through that one.
Marco - it is misinformation. Generating children whilst on benefits or low income is well known as a great way to take money off hard-working taxpayers, get access to social housing and have a meal ticket for a good 16/18 years for each one. Just look at the number of large "families", preferably single parent with no visible means of support. Even better, you can plead poverty and the cringeing liberals and gullible press simply lap it up. The other problem is that many of these ATM kids are from a low quality gene pool with inadequate parental care and are essentially apprentice criminals. It's the childless single people on benefits who have it really hard - no lunch bags for them seemingly? Jesus would see through that one. Citizen Cane
  • Score: 6

9:24am Thu 31 Jul 14

underwater says...

marco999 wrote:
While the idea of this project is a thoroughly admirable one and should be applauded, I have to ask, are there really this many children in our borough who are going hungry and are in need of food handouts? There have always been poor kids; I was in fact a poor kid back in the 70’s, one of six who existed on hand me downs and charity handouts while my parents worked and never claimed benefits but despite our poverty we never ever missed a meal. I really can’t believe that now in the 21st century there are parents so poor that they can’t afford to feed their children. If necessary I could feed myself quite adequately for a couple of pounds per day or less so I can’t understand why these so called poor parents are relying on charitable handouts for their children. I see single parents all the time and they all have a house, all the toys their kids could ever want, designer clothing, a 50 inch TV, booze – you name it, so where are all these ultra poor kids who need food handouts actually coming from?
Agree with all you are saying, you only need to stand outside what was once Heaton Library and is now a so called children's centre. All the parents and children turn up in flashy cars with designer gear etc. There may be a handful of children in Bolton that are in need, but certainly not at this centre . Also if the parents of most of these children in Bolton did not waste money on tattoo's, mobile phones etc they could feed there own children.
[quote][p][bold]marco999[/bold] wrote: While the idea of this project is a thoroughly admirable one and should be applauded, I have to ask, are there really this many children in our borough who are going hungry and are in need of food handouts? There have always been poor kids; I was in fact a poor kid back in the 70’s, one of six who existed on hand me downs and charity handouts while my parents worked and never claimed benefits but despite our poverty we never ever missed a meal. I really can’t believe that now in the 21st century there are parents so poor that they can’t afford to feed their children. If necessary I could feed myself quite adequately for a couple of pounds per day or less so I can’t understand why these so called poor parents are relying on charitable handouts for their children. I see single parents all the time and they all have a house, all the toys their kids could ever want, designer clothing, a 50 inch TV, booze – you name it, so where are all these ultra poor kids who need food handouts actually coming from?[/p][/quote]Agree with all you are saying, you only need to stand outside what was once Heaton Library and is now a so called children's centre. All the parents and children turn up in flashy cars with designer gear etc. There may be a handful of children in Bolton that are in need, but certainly not at this centre . Also if the parents of most of these children in Bolton did not waste money on tattoo's, mobile phones etc they could feed there own children. underwater
  • Score: 10

9:56am Thu 31 Jul 14

Wolfie190 says...

Whats the criteria for being poor in Bolton do you have to prove you have the latest phone on a £35 quid a month contract aged 11 ?
Whats the criteria for being poor in Bolton do you have to prove you have the latest phone on a £35 quid a month contract aged 11 ? Wolfie190
  • Score: 4

10:07am Thu 31 Jul 14

Yougotredonyou says...

I'm in agreement with all the comments, both me and my husband work full time, get no benefits at all, no help, we can barely afford tattoos, beer, holidays, how in the world are the so called poor affording it?? They afford it as they are entitled to free dental care, prescriptions, rent, council tax, discounted pet care, school meals, uniforms, food at food banks, now this. I am taking my child to town today but will have to PAY for her dinner like I do everything else, when is this going to stop??
I'm in agreement with all the comments, both me and my husband work full time, get no benefits at all, no help, we can barely afford tattoos, beer, holidays, how in the world are the so called poor affording it?? They afford it as they are entitled to free dental care, prescriptions, rent, council tax, discounted pet care, school meals, uniforms, food at food banks, now this. I am taking my child to town today but will have to PAY for her dinner like I do everything else, when is this going to stop?? Yougotredonyou
  • Score: 13

10:11am Thu 31 Jul 14

Terry McC says...

£25000 could have been better spent give a man a fish feed him for a day give a man a fishing rod its not handouts that are needed its better paid jobs
£25000 could have been better spent give a man a fish feed him for a day give a man a fishing rod its not handouts that are needed its better paid jobs Terry McC
  • Score: 5

10:16am Thu 31 Jul 14

underwater says...

Yougotredonyou wrote:
I'm in agreement with all the comments, both me and my husband work full time, get no benefits at all, no help, we can barely afford tattoos, beer, holidays, how in the world are the so called poor affording it?? They afford it as they are entitled to free dental care, prescriptions, rent, council tax, discounted pet care, school meals, uniforms, food at food banks, now this. I am taking my child to town today but will have to PAY for her dinner like I do everything else, when is this going to stop??
It will never stop until we grasp the nettle and realise that the benefits system is creating more problems than it will ever solve. When two people produce a child, that child is soley the responsibility of the parents. ie no benefits, no free childcare no child allowance,or even free lunches.
[quote][p][bold]Yougotredonyou[/bold] wrote: I'm in agreement with all the comments, both me and my husband work full time, get no benefits at all, no help, we can barely afford tattoos, beer, holidays, how in the world are the so called poor affording it?? They afford it as they are entitled to free dental care, prescriptions, rent, council tax, discounted pet care, school meals, uniforms, food at food banks, now this. I am taking my child to town today but will have to PAY for her dinner like I do everything else, when is this going to stop??[/p][/quote]It will never stop until we grasp the nettle and realise that the benefits system is creating more problems than it will ever solve. When two people produce a child, that child is soley the responsibility of the parents. ie no benefits, no free childcare no child allowance,or even free lunches. underwater
  • Score: 8

12:16pm Thu 31 Jul 14

Tim Burr says...

Whilst I applaud the volunteers and those behind this inclusive scheme, my only concern is are we creating a generation where handouts become expectation?

I've long been an advocate of council money being used to educate many parents in cookery and believe it or not shopping, we had some success but it's a long road and not short term as some Councillors would prefer ( it doesn't make the news anymore). In a so called wealthy country with a generous benefit system that granted isn't perfect, without desperately needed education (which should be passed down to our children - as it is with many - dare I say Asian families), I think we'll see an explosion of schemes such as this, as we have have with the imported American foodbank phenomenon , the same foodbanks that have been 'begged' to run education classes in conjunction with the council - but education doesn't appear to suit the operators.
Whilst I applaud the volunteers and those behind this inclusive scheme, my only concern is are we creating a generation where handouts become expectation? I've long been an advocate of council money being used to educate many parents in cookery and believe it or not shopping, we had some success but it's a long road and not short term as some Councillors would prefer ( it doesn't make the news anymore). In a so called wealthy country with a generous benefit system that granted isn't perfect, without desperately needed education (which should be passed down to our children - as it is with many - dare I say Asian families), I think we'll see an explosion of schemes such as this, as we have have with the imported American foodbank phenomenon , the same foodbanks that have been 'begged' to run education classes in conjunction with the council - but education doesn't appear to suit the operators. Tim Burr
  • Score: 0

2:00pm Thu 31 Jul 14

Lancashire always says...

marco999 wrote:
While the idea of this project is a thoroughly admirable one and should be applauded, I have to ask, are there really this many children in our borough who are going hungry and are in need of food handouts? There have always been poor kids; I was in fact a poor kid back in the 70’s, one of six who existed on hand me downs and charity handouts while my parents worked and never claimed benefits but despite our poverty we never ever missed a meal. I really can’t believe that now in the 21st century there are parents so poor that they can’t afford to feed their children. If necessary I could feed myself quite adequately for a couple of pounds per day or less so I can’t understand why these so called poor parents are relying on charitable handouts for their children. I see single parents all the time and they all have a house, all the toys their kids could ever want, designer clothing, a 50 inch TV, booze – you name it, so where are all these ultra poor kids who need food handouts actually coming from?
I have been a single parent for years i still dont have a 50 inch tv or designer clothes i save up for a drink and do not have central heating though as i nearly own my own house i am hoping to get it before i retire once my Mortgage is paid. My biggest mistake appears to be i have worked all my life so get nothing and no i did not accept free meals or handouts either also my child never went hungry.
No one appears able to make a meal from scratch these days `Take aways seem to be flourishing my mum would turn in her urn if she saw a Pizza being delivered never mind a pre packed freebie lunch because she was poor !!
[quote][p][bold]marco999[/bold] wrote: While the idea of this project is a thoroughly admirable one and should be applauded, I have to ask, are there really this many children in our borough who are going hungry and are in need of food handouts? There have always been poor kids; I was in fact a poor kid back in the 70’s, one of six who existed on hand me downs and charity handouts while my parents worked and never claimed benefits but despite our poverty we never ever missed a meal. I really can’t believe that now in the 21st century there are parents so poor that they can’t afford to feed their children. If necessary I could feed myself quite adequately for a couple of pounds per day or less so I can’t understand why these so called poor parents are relying on charitable handouts for their children. I see single parents all the time and they all have a house, all the toys their kids could ever want, designer clothing, a 50 inch TV, booze – you name it, so where are all these ultra poor kids who need food handouts actually coming from?[/p][/quote]I have been a single parent for years i still dont have a 50 inch tv or designer clothes i save up for a drink and do not have central heating though as i nearly own my own house i am hoping to get it before i retire once my Mortgage is paid. My biggest mistake appears to be i have worked all my life so get nothing and no i did not accept free meals or handouts either also my child never went hungry. No one appears able to make a meal from scratch these days `Take aways seem to be flourishing my mum would turn in her urn if she saw a Pizza being delivered never mind a pre packed freebie lunch because she was poor !! Lancashire always
  • Score: 10

3:47pm Thu 31 Jul 14

itstheirfault says...

Whilst of course there is the Daily Mail view of poverty in the UK, there are in fact people with real need.
One only has to visit some of the less well off areas of our town and the country to see that some children live in real hardship.
Also some people are completely missing another point about this scheme. There are comments suggesting that the poster of the comment was also poor yet they were happy, happy because they were poor etc. this may well have been the case however some children live in poverty and are not looked after as well as they might be, what is one expected to do, turn a blind eye? Do nothing? Do nothing but then post snippy little comments under an article about people actually doing something? Society is there to help other people. Stop posting snippy comments and do something......anyth
ing.
Whilst of course there is the Daily Mail view of poverty in the UK, there are in fact people with real need. One only has to visit some of the less well off areas of our town and the country to see that some children live in real hardship. Also some people are completely missing another point about this scheme. There are comments suggesting that the poster of the comment was also poor yet they were happy, happy because they were poor etc. this may well have been the case however some children live in poverty and are not looked after as well as they might be, what is one expected to do, turn a blind eye? Do nothing? Do nothing but then post snippy little comments under an article about people actually doing something? Society is there to help other people. Stop posting snippy comments and do something......anyth ing. itstheirfault
  • Score: 1

3:49pm Thu 31 Jul 14

itstheirfault says...

Whilst of course there is the Daily Mail view of poverty in the UK, there are in fact people with real need.
One only has to visit some of the less well off areas of our town and the country to see that some children live in real hardship.
Also some people are completely missing another point about this scheme. There are comments suggesting that the poster of the comment was also poor yet they were happy, happy because they were poor etc. this may well have been the case however some children live in poverty and are not looked after as well as they might be, what is one expected to do, turn a blind eye? Do nothing? Do nothing but then post snippy little comments under an article about people actually doing something? Society is there to help other people. Stop posting snippy comments and do something......anyth
ing.
Whilst of course there is the Daily Mail view of poverty in the UK, there are in fact people with real need. One only has to visit some of the less well off areas of our town and the country to see that some children live in real hardship. Also some people are completely missing another point about this scheme. There are comments suggesting that the poster of the comment was also poor yet they were happy, happy because they were poor etc. this may well have been the case however some children live in poverty and are not looked after as well as they might be, what is one expected to do, turn a blind eye? Do nothing? Do nothing but then post snippy little comments under an article about people actually doing something? Society is there to help other people. Stop posting snippy comments and do something......anyth ing. itstheirfault
  • Score: 5

6:40pm Thu 31 Jul 14

boltonnut says...

Cigs,booze,drugs and tattoos are the priority of some parents,their children come second.Also it take two parents to adequately nurture and provide a normal environment for children. It's frustrating to see babies being pumped out without regard of their well being,then to top it off single mothers with several children are being welcomed into the country from third world countries without any visible means of support except for the working tax payers of Britain.
Cigs,booze,drugs and tattoos are the priority of some parents,their children come second.Also it take two parents to adequately nurture and provide a normal environment for children. It's frustrating to see babies being pumped out without regard of their well being,then to top it off single mothers with several children are being welcomed into the country from third world countries without any visible means of support except for the working tax payers of Britain. boltonnut
  • Score: 3

6:55pm Thu 31 Jul 14

Wolfie190 says...

itstheirfault wrote:
Whilst of course there is the Daily Mail view of poverty in the UK, there are in fact people with real need.
One only has to visit some of the less well off areas of our town and the country to see that some children live in real hardship.
Also some people are completely missing another point about this scheme. There are comments suggesting that the poster of the comment was also poor yet they were happy, happy because they were poor etc. this may well have been the case however some children live in poverty and are not looked after as well as they might be, what is one expected to do, turn a blind eye? Do nothing? Do nothing but then post snippy little comments under an article about people actually doing something? Society is there to help other people. Stop posting snippy comments and do something......anyth

ing.
Its the kids in these areas that have the latest trainers, Smartphones, big designer labels splashed across their clothes, tacky gold jewellery including bad attitudes and are breeding before they have even left school. They are perpetuating the problem. Handouts they need neutering. Do their parents shop on Bolton market do they hell, Takeaways deliver these days.
[quote][p][bold]itstheirfault[/bold] wrote: Whilst of course there is the Daily Mail view of poverty in the UK, there are in fact people with real need. One only has to visit some of the less well off areas of our town and the country to see that some children live in real hardship. Also some people are completely missing another point about this scheme. There are comments suggesting that the poster of the comment was also poor yet they were happy, happy because they were poor etc. this may well have been the case however some children live in poverty and are not looked after as well as they might be, what is one expected to do, turn a blind eye? Do nothing? Do nothing but then post snippy little comments under an article about people actually doing something? Society is there to help other people. Stop posting snippy comments and do something......anyth ing.[/p][/quote]Its the kids in these areas that have the latest trainers, Smartphones, big designer labels splashed across their clothes, tacky gold jewellery including bad attitudes and are breeding before they have even left school. They are perpetuating the problem. Handouts they need neutering. Do their parents shop on Bolton market do they hell, Takeaways deliver these days. Wolfie190
  • Score: 1

9:24pm Thu 31 Jul 14

Daz Bond says...

Forgive me if I am wrong but is there a clue in the food that they are providing a clue to the children they are suggesting are in poverty?
I don't think a child from a tattooed, alcoholic drug taking smoker will be requesting Halal meat or a vegetarian option
Forgive me if I am wrong but is there a clue in the food that they are providing a clue to the children they are suggesting are in poverty? I don't think a child from a tattooed, alcoholic drug taking smoker will be requesting Halal meat or a vegetarian option Daz Bond
  • Score: 1

9:58pm Thu 31 Jul 14

Le Bison says...

It is unfortunately not quite as simple as many posters suggest. There is a large and increasing proportion of people who are using foobanks who are WORKING -not living solely on benefits. In addition 40% or so of new housing benefit claimants are WORKING. The biggest savings have been made from the benefit system have not been by cutting housing benefit through the bedroom tax but by reductions in tax credits for those that are working with families. Bolton has one of the lowest wage economies in the country and people are being driven to places like foodbanks by the twin impact of welfare reforms (bedroom tax, cuts to disability benefits etc) plus the rising cost of of fuel and energy, lack of affordable credit, increasing costs of schooling and stagnating wages. Dont take my word for it - go and offer your help for a few days at the foodbanks or other similar agencies and see it for yourselves. I doubt very much whether the stereotypical lone parent non working druggie with a 50in tv will be the main beenficiaries of this scheme. Far more likely to be hard working families on low wages struggling to make ends meet. The subsidy given back to Local Government to mitigate against welfare reform is nationally lower in the NorthWest of England than it is anywhere else in the country - here is the data supporting that point https://www.dropbox.
com/s/lfecqq3vk2hb97
f/Percentage%20chanc
e%20of%20a%20social%
20tenant%20getting%2
0a%20DHP%20for%20bed
room%20tax%20TABLES.
pdf
It is unfortunately not quite as simple as many posters suggest. There is a large and increasing proportion of people who are using foobanks who are WORKING -not living solely on benefits. In addition 40% or so of new housing benefit claimants are WORKING. The biggest savings have been made from the benefit system have not been by cutting housing benefit through the bedroom tax but by reductions in tax credits for those that are working with families. Bolton has one of the lowest wage economies in the country and people are being driven to places like foodbanks by the twin impact of welfare reforms (bedroom tax, cuts to disability benefits etc) plus the rising cost of of fuel and energy, lack of affordable credit, increasing costs of schooling and stagnating wages. Dont take my word for it - go and offer your help for a few days at the foodbanks or other similar agencies and see it for yourselves. I doubt very much whether the stereotypical lone parent non working druggie with a 50in tv will be the main beenficiaries of this scheme. Far more likely to be hard working families on low wages struggling to make ends meet. The subsidy given back to Local Government to mitigate against welfare reform is nationally lower in the NorthWest of England than it is anywhere else in the country - here is the data supporting that point https://www.dropbox. com/s/lfecqq3vk2hb97 f/Percentage%20chanc e%20of%20a%20social% 20tenant%20getting%2 0a%20DHP%20for%20bed room%20tax%20TABLES. pdf Le Bison
  • Score: 4

10:54am Fri 1 Aug 14

Yougotredonyou says...

Le Bison wrote:
It is unfortunately not quite as simple as many posters suggest. There is a large and increasing proportion of people who are using foobanks who are WORKING -not living solely on benefits. In addition 40% or so of new housing benefit claimants are WORKING. The biggest savings have been made from the benefit system have not been by cutting housing benefit through the bedroom tax but by reductions in tax credits for those that are working with families. Bolton has one of the lowest wage economies in the country and people are being driven to places like foodbanks by the twin impact of welfare reforms (bedroom tax, cuts to disability benefits etc) plus the rising cost of of fuel and energy, lack of affordable credit, increasing costs of schooling and stagnating wages. Dont take my word for it - go and offer your help for a few days at the foodbanks or other similar agencies and see it for yourselves. I doubt very much whether the stereotypical lone parent non working druggie with a 50in tv will be the main beenficiaries of this scheme. Far more likely to be hard working families on low wages struggling to make ends meet. The subsidy given back to Local Government to mitigate against welfare reform is nationally lower in the NorthWest of England than it is anywhere else in the country - here is the data supporting that point https://www.dropbox.

com/s/lfecqq3vk2hb97

f/Percentage%20chanc

e%20of%20a%20social%

20tenant%20getting%2

0a%20DHP%20for%20bed

room%20tax%20TABLES.

pdf
So surely the answer would be cut income support and job seekers, or at least cap it to a maximum of 3-4 kids you can claim for, and raise working tax credits, or the working aspect of universal credits, it's costing my family more and more whilst working, but when I was younger and Claiming benefits I was out most weekends, had the latest consoles etc, decent clothes, it's preposterous the way that working people aren't helped more, especially in this economic climate
[quote][p][bold]Le Bison[/bold] wrote: It is unfortunately not quite as simple as many posters suggest. There is a large and increasing proportion of people who are using foobanks who are WORKING -not living solely on benefits. In addition 40% or so of new housing benefit claimants are WORKING. The biggest savings have been made from the benefit system have not been by cutting housing benefit through the bedroom tax but by reductions in tax credits for those that are working with families. Bolton has one of the lowest wage economies in the country and people are being driven to places like foodbanks by the twin impact of welfare reforms (bedroom tax, cuts to disability benefits etc) plus the rising cost of of fuel and energy, lack of affordable credit, increasing costs of schooling and stagnating wages. Dont take my word for it - go and offer your help for a few days at the foodbanks or other similar agencies and see it for yourselves. I doubt very much whether the stereotypical lone parent non working druggie with a 50in tv will be the main beenficiaries of this scheme. Far more likely to be hard working families on low wages struggling to make ends meet. The subsidy given back to Local Government to mitigate against welfare reform is nationally lower in the NorthWest of England than it is anywhere else in the country - here is the data supporting that point https://www.dropbox. com/s/lfecqq3vk2hb97 f/Percentage%20chanc e%20of%20a%20social% 20tenant%20getting%2 0a%20DHP%20for%20bed room%20tax%20TABLES. pdf[/p][/quote]So surely the answer would be cut income support and job seekers, or at least cap it to a maximum of 3-4 kids you can claim for, and raise working tax credits, or the working aspect of universal credits, it's costing my family more and more whilst working, but when I was younger and Claiming benefits I was out most weekends, had the latest consoles etc, decent clothes, it's preposterous the way that working people aren't helped more, especially in this economic climate Yougotredonyou
  • Score: 2

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