Fishing is now on curriculum at Smithills School

Left, Tiffany Lomax fishing alongside Smithills School pals

Josh Lomax, aged 11, shows off his catch

Ugh, says Tiffany Lomax, aged 11, with a box of maggots

First published in News The Bolton News: Photograph of the Author by , reporter

SOMETHING fishy has been going on at Smithills School.

The school has been working with the Environment Agency and Bolton Angling Club to get fishing on the curriculum.

Smithills is now the only school in the North West offering angling activities to students on site and has seven members of staff who are professionally trained angling coaches.

The school, in Smithills Dean Road, has set up its own angling club, which meets weekly during term time, and has a school angling team which competes with other clubs locally at weekends.

All the fishing is done on a lake on the school site, owned by Bolton Angling Club.

The initiatives have been spearheaded by Smithills headteacher and keen angler Alec Cottrill.

He said: “Fishing is now available to every pupil – it really has become part of school life here.

“It allows pupils to learn so much about the environment especially about the water cycle and importance of water, weather patterns and the effect humans can have on all of these.

“In science they build an understanding of common plants and animals, photosynthesis and food chains.

“There are connections with many other areas of the curriculum too. Fishing can be linked to maths so pupils understand about measuring water depths and using weights to balance floats.”

The Environment Agency has worked with the school to provide safe access to the water, including disabled access.

Steve Powell, fisheries specialist for the Environment Agency, added: “This is an excellent opportunity for children attending Smithills to learn a new sport they haven’t tried before.

“It is great that the school is developing the children’s interest in the environment and fishing and we hope the skills they develop will stay with them throughout their school lives and beyond.

“These pupils will become the anglers and environmentalists of the future.”

 

Comments (5)

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11:12am Tue 5 Aug 14

Tracie S. Faulkner says...

my aunty recently purchased a nearly new gold BMW M6 Convertible by working parttime off of a home computer. view

===>>>>x.co/5Bouo
my aunty recently purchased a nearly new gold BMW M6 Convertible by working parttime off of a home computer. view ===>>>>x.co/5Bouo Tracie S. Faulkner
  • Score: -5

11:39am Tue 5 Aug 14

Beyond News Forum says...

i don;t understand how fishing is helping kids get an education.

I understand teaching them environmental issues... but fishing? It is hardly a fitness sport if you could call it a sport at all.

Don;t get me wrong, fishing is cool by me, but to add fishing to lessons is a little cod... oops I mean odd.
i don;t understand how fishing is helping kids get an education. I understand teaching them environmental issues... but fishing? It is hardly a fitness sport if you could call it a sport at all. Don;t get me wrong, fishing is cool by me, but to add fishing to lessons is a little cod... oops I mean odd. Beyond News Forum
  • Score: -1

11:57am Tue 5 Aug 14

lv8151 says...

Catch-and-release fishing is cruelty disguised as “sport.” Studies show that fish who are caught and then returned to the water suffer such severe physiological stress that they often die of shock. Fish often swallow hooks, and anglers may try to retrieve a hook by shoving their fingers or pliers down the fish’s throat, ripping out not just the hook but some of the fish’s throat and guts as well. When fish are handled, the protective coating on their bodies is disturbed. These and other injuries make fish easy targets for predators once they are returned to the water.

Read more: http://www.peta.org/
about-peta/why-peta/
catch-and-release-fi
shing/#ixzz39VvS4fsx
Catch-and-release fishing is cruelty disguised as “sport.” Studies show that fish who are caught and then returned to the water suffer such severe physiological stress that they often die of shock. Fish often swallow hooks, and anglers may try to retrieve a hook by shoving their fingers or pliers down the fish’s throat, ripping out not just the hook but some of the fish’s throat and guts as well. When fish are handled, the protective coating on their bodies is disturbed. These and other injuries make fish easy targets for predators once they are returned to the water. Read more: http://www.peta.org/ about-peta/why-peta/ catch-and-release-fi shing/#ixzz39VvS4fsx lv8151
  • Score: -4

12:59pm Tue 5 Aug 14

EmShambles says...

Beyond News Forum wrote:
i don;t understand how fishing is helping kids get an education.

I understand teaching them environmental issues... but fishing? It is hardly a fitness sport if you could call it a sport at all.

Don;t get me wrong, fishing is cool by me, but to add fishing to lessons is a little cod... oops I mean odd.
I think it's about focus,concentration,
relaxation and patience.Useful skills in education and life.I think so anyway.
[quote][p][bold]Beyond News Forum[/bold] wrote: i don;t understand how fishing is helping kids get an education. I understand teaching them environmental issues... but fishing? It is hardly a fitness sport if you could call it a sport at all. Don;t get me wrong, fishing is cool by me, but to add fishing to lessons is a little cod... oops I mean odd.[/p][/quote]I think it's about focus,concentration, relaxation and patience.Useful skills in education and life.I think so anyway. EmShambles
  • Score: 8

4:49pm Tue 5 Aug 14

Boltonlad45 says...

lv8151 wrote:
Catch-and-release fishing is cruelty disguised as “sport.” Studies show that fish who are caught and then returned to the water suffer such severe physiological stress that they often die of shock. Fish often swallow hooks, and anglers may try to retrieve a hook by shoving their fingers or pliers down the fish’s throat, ripping out not just the hook but some of the fish’s throat and guts as well. When fish are handled, the protective coating on their bodies is disturbed. These and other injuries make fish easy targets for predators once they are returned to the water.

Read more: http://www.peta.org/

about-peta/why-peta/

catch-and-release-fi

shing/#ixzz39VvS4fsx
Not sure where you are getting your facts from - probably PETA. Fish don't suffer such physiological stress that they often die from shock as this doesn't happen. I am sure that if Smithills school has qualified angling instructors that they will be teaching them proper handling techniques that minimise stress to the fish. I think you need to look at modern angling techniques which have come a long way in fish care before you try to radicalise a sport that brings great benefit to all its participants as well as bringing up a new generation ready and willing to understand and care for their environment.
[quote][p][bold]lv8151[/bold] wrote: Catch-and-release fishing is cruelty disguised as “sport.” Studies show that fish who are caught and then returned to the water suffer such severe physiological stress that they often die of shock. Fish often swallow hooks, and anglers may try to retrieve a hook by shoving their fingers or pliers down the fish’s throat, ripping out not just the hook but some of the fish’s throat and guts as well. When fish are handled, the protective coating on their bodies is disturbed. These and other injuries make fish easy targets for predators once they are returned to the water. Read more: http://www.peta.org/ about-peta/why-peta/ catch-and-release-fi shing/#ixzz39VvS4fsx[/p][/quote]Not sure where you are getting your facts from - probably PETA. Fish don't suffer such physiological stress that they often die from shock as this doesn't happen. I am sure that if Smithills school has qualified angling instructors that they will be teaching them proper handling techniques that minimise stress to the fish. I think you need to look at modern angling techniques which have come a long way in fish care before you try to radicalise a sport that brings great benefit to all its participants as well as bringing up a new generation ready and willing to understand and care for their environment. Boltonlad45
  • Score: 3

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