New trust promises to deliver for under-achieving schools

TWO schools in Bolton will be managed by a new trust which says it will help “deliver the highest levels of attainment in English and maths”.

The Northern Education Trust, a Department for Education approved charity, was launched last week when it became the country’s first multi-academy trust.

The Ferns in Farnworth and Kearsley Academy will be managed by the new trust.

Outside sponsors Northern Education were drafted in to the two schools under the Government’s programme to drive up standards.

Kearsley Academy became the first academy school to be managed by Northern Education.

When Bolton Council suggested Northern Education might sponsor a second academy, this time a failing primary school — the former Plodder Lane School — it became apparent that a multi- academy trust would have to be formed.

Good or outstanding schools which want to become academies — state-funded independent schools — are not run by sponsors.

Northern Education, a education consultancy which provides support to failing schools, will sponsor the Northern Education Trust. It launched with four schools under its management – Kearsley Academy and Ferns Primary Academy in Bolton, Ryecroft Primary Academy in Bradford and North Shore Academy in Stockton.

Indications suggest as many as 12 schools will be under Northern Education Trust management within a year.

The new trust says its academies “will operate with a clear strategy for delivering the highest levels of attainment in English and mathematics and will focus on achieving outstanding governance and self- management with decision-making at school level”.

Comments (4)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

10:25am Tue 9 Oct 12

lindlandl says...

What will it take for people to realise that the management of and teaching in schools is not the problem? Until all parents take enough interest in their children, value education, spend time reading to their children and reinforcing and supporting what is done in school in an appropriate way at home, in children's everyday lives, their will always be underachieving children and failing schools. The problem is a social one, not one of school management or teaching standards.
What will it take for people to realise that the management of and teaching in schools is not the problem? Until all parents take enough interest in their children, value education, spend time reading to their children and reinforcing and supporting what is done in school in an appropriate way at home, in children's everyday lives, their will always be underachieving children and failing schools. The problem is a social one, not one of school management or teaching standards. lindlandl

3:59pm Tue 9 Oct 12

SmoggyDiasboro says...

and until some people can differentiate between 'there' and 'their', their considered contributions towards education related debates should be discounted
and until some people can differentiate between 'there' and 'their', their considered contributions towards education related debates should be discounted SmoggyDiasboro

4:38pm Tue 9 Oct 12

morganof4 says...

would that be a 50% discount or a 100% discount? Bit petty to pull someone up like that, especially when they have a good point
would that be a 50% discount or a 100% discount? Bit petty to pull someone up like that, especially when they have a good point morganof4

4:52pm Tue 9 Oct 12

SmoggyDiasboro says...

This is an article about education. Someone with a pro-teacher stance (never the poor teacher / manager's fault - see articles passim) needs to be very careful about language used. I stick by my point. Yes - it is petty, but in an article about Bolton Wanderers or Lisa Riley, I can accept it, and would never point it out. In an article about quality of education, I consider it a fair point. As to the level of the discount - you're right, only 50%. The points are valid, to an extent, but grammatical inexactitude when criticising parents at the cost of educators is not acceptable.
This is an article about education. Someone with a pro-teacher stance (never the poor teacher / manager's fault - see articles passim) needs to be very careful about language used. I stick by my point. Yes - it is petty, but in an article about Bolton Wanderers or Lisa Riley, I can accept it, and would never point it out. In an article about quality of education, I consider it a fair point. As to the level of the discount - you're right, only 50%. The points are valid, to an extent, but grammatical inexactitude when criticising parents at the cost of educators is not acceptable. SmoggyDiasboro

Comments are closed on this article.

click2find

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree