Busway to close major route into Tyldesley for five months

The closure will allow National Grid to replace a high pressure gas mains pipe

The closure will allow National Grid to replace a high pressure gas mains pipe

First published in North West
Last updated

A MAJOR road will be closed for five months while a gas main is replaced to facilitate the guided busway in Tyldesley.

Hough Lane will be closed to vehicles from April 22 until September 26 from number 11 to 14 and access will only be possible between the Sale Lane junction and 11 Hough Lane.

The closure will allow National Grid to replace a high pressure gas mains pipe located next to Hough Lane bridge.

The road closure will not affect pedestrian access and a footway will be available across the bridge at all times during this work, allowing pedestrians and dismounted cyclists to continue to use the route.

A TfGM spokesman said: “The work is crucial because the current pipe is not suitable for the anticipated weight from the busway and is located too high within the proposed embankment where construction will take place. It will not affect the gas supply to nearby residential properties.”

Traffic will be diverted via Sale Lane, Mosley Common Road, East Lancashire Road, Chaddock Lane and Manchester Road. Diversion signs will be in place in advance of the closure.

TfGM’s head of programme management services, Peter Boulton, said: “This gas pipeline forms part of the National Grid high pressure network, meaning that these works must be carried out during the summer months when demand for gas is low.

“The closure is necessary to provide National Grid with sufficient space for the works to be carried out, ensuring the safety of both the public and staff.

“We apologise for the disruption this will cause to residents and drivers in the area and appreciate their patience during these works.”

More information about the Leigh-Salford-Manchester busway can be found at www.tfgm.com/buspriority.

Comments (4)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

12:02am Wed 12 Mar 14

JaneinBongs says...

This is insanity! I had no choice but leave my job in Trafford Park on account of the drive on the East Lancs Road from Astley to Worsley between 6.30 - 8.30 could take it could take up to 2 hours.
The busway plan has gone ahead though it was highly opposed and quite rightly so. How on Earth is taking a lane away from one of the most congested roads in the UK going to ease the problem? It may benefit those already using public transport who work in Manchester but the planners fail to understand that the majority are employed at one of Europe's largest business parks - Trafford Park, which has no transport links unless you are able to drive. Surely it didn't take much research to discover that most people are trying to access a motorway network that's less than 4 miles away.

In light of this, I took a substantial pay drop and take a job in Bolton to to avoid the unaffordable childcare at this time of day. Now it looks like I'm back to square one with Hough Lane inaccessible and Atherton, which is already heavily congested, taking the hit.
This is insanity! I had no choice but leave my job in Trafford Park on account of the drive on the East Lancs Road from Astley to Worsley between 6.30 - 8.30 could take it could take up to 2 hours. The busway plan has gone ahead though it was highly opposed and quite rightly so. How on Earth is taking a lane away from one of the most congested roads in the UK going to ease the problem? It may benefit those already using public transport who work in Manchester but the planners fail to understand that the majority are employed at one of Europe's largest business parks - Trafford Park, which has no transport links unless you are able to drive. Surely it didn't take much research to discover that most people are trying to access a motorway network that's less than 4 miles away. In light of this, I took a substantial pay drop and take a job in Bolton to to avoid the unaffordable childcare at this time of day. Now it looks like I'm back to square one with Hough Lane inaccessible and Atherton, which is already heavily congested, taking the hit. JaneinBongs
  • Score: 18

3:03pm Thu 13 Mar 14

Tyldesley_Focus says...

I have no doubt these hair-brained plans will cause chaos for residents and commuters.
The works to the High Pressure Gas Pipe on Hough Lane will cause much disruption. Many residents, commuters and shoppers who live and pass through Tyldesley are exhausted from the current work to date and will not appreciate that yet more is to come.
Aside from this, there will undoubtedly be a fear regarding the works to a major Gas Line at this site and the potential for harm if managed incorrectly.
After receiving the letter, I replied to TfGM demanding answers to some simple questions:
1) The work is due to the location of the current gas pipe in relation to a proposed embankment to allow buses to cross this junction. What alternatives were considered to creating the embankment and why were they ruled out?
2) Within the proposed scheme are there any alternatives to proceeding with these works?
3) How will you ensure the safety and continuity of gas supply to adjacent properties during the proposed works? I want an absolute assurance that the safety of residents will be paramount during the period.
4) What safeguards are in place to ensure that the initial estimate of 16 buses per hour crossing this junction (plus any future increase on this) will not damage the replaced pipe?
5) Please assure me that all steps will be taken to mitigate and minimise the disruption to residents, such that the works are completed on time or ahead of schedule; without compromising resident safety.
As of yet - I have received no response.

Many residents are unaware of the plans for a Guided Busway stop at Hough Lane, purportedly by raising the busway to cross the bridge. The stoppages here for 16 buses an hour (8 each way) combined with 16 buses an hour at Astley Street (8 each way again, half of which will go through and around Tyldesley Town Centre) makes you realise this is a recipe for congestion hell.

You'll be pleased to know therefore that "the experts" have sat down with their "models" and expect there to be "negligable impact" on you.
I have no doubt these hair-brained plans will cause chaos for residents and commuters. The works to the High Pressure Gas Pipe on Hough Lane will cause much disruption. Many residents, commuters and shoppers who live and pass through Tyldesley are exhausted from the current work to date and will not appreciate that yet more is to come. Aside from this, there will undoubtedly be a fear regarding the works to a major Gas Line at this site and the potential for harm if managed incorrectly. After receiving the letter, I replied to TfGM demanding answers to some simple questions: 1) The work is due to the location of the current gas pipe in relation to a proposed embankment to allow buses to cross this junction. What alternatives were considered to creating the embankment and why were they ruled out? 2) Within the proposed scheme are there any alternatives to proceeding with these works? 3) How will you ensure the safety and continuity of gas supply to adjacent properties during the proposed works? I want an absolute assurance that the safety of residents will be paramount during the period. 4) What safeguards are in place to ensure that the initial estimate of 16 buses per hour crossing this junction (plus any future increase on this) will not damage the replaced pipe? 5) Please assure me that all steps will be taken to mitigate and minimise the disruption to residents, such that the works are completed on time or ahead of schedule; without compromising resident safety. As of yet - I have received no response. Many residents are unaware of the plans for a Guided Busway stop at Hough Lane, purportedly by raising the busway to cross the bridge. The stoppages here for 16 buses an hour (8 each way) combined with 16 buses an hour at Astley Street (8 each way again, half of which will go through and around Tyldesley Town Centre) makes you realise this is a recipe for congestion hell. You'll be pleased to know therefore that "the experts" have sat down with their "models" and expect there to be "negligable impact" on you. Tyldesley_Focus
  • Score: 5

6:01am Sun 16 Mar 14

PostPACE says...

Initial estimate of 16 buses per hour they won't need that many no one uses them. Unless of course we will be subsidizing a lot of empty buses to drive up an empty lane.
Initial estimate of 16 buses per hour they won't need that many no one uses them. Unless of course we will be subsidizing a lot of empty buses to drive up an empty lane. PostPACE
  • Score: 3

8:22pm Tue 18 Mar 14

Tyldesley_Focus says...

I've received the following update from TfGM regarding the works on Hough Lane which will result in closure for 5 months from April until the end of September

Dear Councillor Valentine,

Thank you for your email and I hope the following provides the information you require.

The work is due to the location of the current gas pipe in relation to a proposed embankment to allow buses to cross this junction. What alternatives were considered to creating the embankment and why were they ruled out?

One of the main considerations that TfGM use to inform decisions of this nature is accessibility and safety for passengers. The ‘at grade’ proposal provides significantly better accessibility and passenger security when compared with constructing the busway at a lower level within the railway cutting.  If the busway was at the lower level it would result in the stop being located deep in a cutting with limited accessibility for people with restricted mobility, in addition to being away from any natural surveillance for waiting passengers therefore reducing passenger safety.

 There were two options that were considered in detail when undertaking the design for how the guided busway would pass Hough Lane – these options were to travel underneath Hough Lane or to cross Hough Lane at road level which is often refer to as ‘at grade’. Following a design review, it was concluded that to travel beneath Hough Lane, we would have had to widen the structure’s underpass with the introduction of a new bridge structure as the existing one would not be suitable – this option was deemed to be more disruptive as there would still have been the requirement to close Hough Lane during these works.

 Within the proposed scheme are there any alternatives to proceeding with these works?

 These works are crucial to the construction of the guided busway because the current gas pipeline is not suitable for the anticipated weight from the busway and it is currently located too high within the proposed embankment where the busway will be constructed.

 If the busway was to travel beneath Hough Lane, there would still have been the need to close Hough Lane whilst both the work was carried out in relation to the gas main and also a new bridge structure was fitted. This would have resulted in a considerably longer delay than the one to undertake the gas pipeline works only. We would like to take this opportunity to apologise for the inconvenience caused by these works however, we have sought to minimise the disruption caused as much as possible in selecting the preferred option.

Please also note that National Grid are undertaking a nation-wide programme of replacing high pressure gas main pipes. We are working with National Grid so that they can advance their programme in relation to the Hough Lane pipe in order to minimise any future disruption as this pipe would eventually have required replacing regardless of the busway scheme.

 How will you ensure the safety and continuity of gas supply to adjacent properties during the proposed works? I want an absolute assurance that the safety of residents will be paramount during the period.

All parties involved in this project, including National Grid ensure that safety is given the highest priority at all times. The works associated with the high pressure gas main are all controlled using safe systems of work including permits and procedures put in place specifically for this project and that meet the requirements of National Grid’s Licence to Operate.

 The works to be completed at Hough Lane will be undertaken with the pipeline shut down, meaning that the gas will be removed from the section of pipeline that National Grid are working on.  The works to shut down the pipeline and remove the gas will be completed well away from the Hough Lane location so this work will have no impact on the local residents.  The new section of pipeline will be installed dead which means that no gas will be present on site.  The pipeline will then be thoroughly tested before the gas is re-introduced from the locations where it was shut down away from Hough Lane.

 The supply of gas to local residents is maintained by lower pressure pipelines and will not be affected by these works.

 What safeguards are in place to ensure that the initial estimate of 16 buses per hour crossing this junction (plus any future increase on this) will not damage the replaced pipe?

 The design of National Grid high pressure pipelines includes significant risk margins which ensure that anticipated loads and stresses will not damage the pipeline.  The number of buses per hour crossing the bridge will have no bearing on the integrity of the pipeline as it is designed to withstand significantly greater stresses. 

 Please assure me that all steps will be taken to mitigate and minimise the disruption to residents, such that the works are completed on time or ahead of schedule; without compromising resident safety.

 As previously stated, wherever possible, we will seek to minimise any disruption caused. This includes carrying works out over the summer months when the demand for gas is low and traffic flows across the road network are lower, ensuring pedestrians and dismounted cyclists are able to continue to use the route and alternative routes provided for drivers – the alternative route for traffic will be Sale Lane, Mosley Common Road, East Lancashire Road, Chaddock Lane and Manchester Road. Diversion signs will be in place in advance of the closure.

In addition to this, we have sent letters to over 3,000 residents providing advance notice and details of these works and providing ways to contact us directly. A press release was issued, and subsequently details have been provided in the local press. In the coming weeks Balfour Beatty will also be sending out a newsletter providing an update on the scheme’s progress to over 8,000 properties – details of the Hough Lane closure will also be included. We have ensured that MPs and local councillors have been provided with information so they are able to assist the local community.

 House visits have also been carried out by TfGM’s Project Manager and Stakeholder Officers to discuss the proposals and understand the concerns of the most affected residents. National Grid will also be working with those most affected to ensure disruption is kept to a minimum and concerns are addressed and accommodated wherever possible.

 TfGM is also working with National Grid and Balfour Beatty to ensure these works are completed in the shortest time possible, whilst ensuring the safety of both the public and staff.

 

If you have any further queries in relation to the bus priority package, please do not hesitate to contact us at buspriority@tfgm.com or on 0300 123 1177.
 

Kind regards,

David Eve BEng CEng MICE PMP
Programme Manager – LSM Busway
Transport for Greater Manchester
I've received the following update from TfGM regarding the works on Hough Lane which will result in closure for 5 months from April until the end of September Dear Councillor Valentine, Thank you for your email and I hope the following provides the information you require. The work is due to the location of the current gas pipe in relation to a proposed embankment to allow buses to cross this junction. What alternatives were considered to creating the embankment and why were they ruled out? One of the main considerations that TfGM use to inform decisions of this nature is accessibility and safety for passengers. The ‘at grade’ proposal provides significantly better accessibility and passenger security when compared with constructing the busway at a lower level within the railway cutting.  If the busway was at the lower level it would result in the stop being located deep in a cutting with limited accessibility for people with restricted mobility, in addition to being away from any natural surveillance for waiting passengers therefore reducing passenger safety.  There were two options that were considered in detail when undertaking the design for how the guided busway would pass Hough Lane – these options were to travel underneath Hough Lane or to cross Hough Lane at road level which is often refer to as ‘at grade’. Following a design review, it was concluded that to travel beneath Hough Lane, we would have had to widen the structure’s underpass with the introduction of a new bridge structure as the existing one would not be suitable – this option was deemed to be more disruptive as there would still have been the requirement to close Hough Lane during these works.  Within the proposed scheme are there any alternatives to proceeding with these works?  These works are crucial to the construction of the guided busway because the current gas pipeline is not suitable for the anticipated weight from the busway and it is currently located too high within the proposed embankment where the busway will be constructed.  If the busway was to travel beneath Hough Lane, there would still have been the need to close Hough Lane whilst both the work was carried out in relation to the gas main and also a new bridge structure was fitted. This would have resulted in a considerably longer delay than the one to undertake the gas pipeline works only. We would like to take this opportunity to apologise for the inconvenience caused by these works however, we have sought to minimise the disruption caused as much as possible in selecting the preferred option. Please also note that National Grid are undertaking a nation-wide programme of replacing high pressure gas main pipes. We are working with National Grid so that they can advance their programme in relation to the Hough Lane pipe in order to minimise any future disruption as this pipe would eventually have required replacing regardless of the busway scheme.  How will you ensure the safety and continuity of gas supply to adjacent properties during the proposed works? I want an absolute assurance that the safety of residents will be paramount during the period. All parties involved in this project, including National Grid ensure that safety is given the highest priority at all times. The works associated with the high pressure gas main are all controlled using safe systems of work including permits and procedures put in place specifically for this project and that meet the requirements of National Grid’s Licence to Operate.  The works to be completed at Hough Lane will be undertaken with the pipeline shut down, meaning that the gas will be removed from the section of pipeline that National Grid are working on.  The works to shut down the pipeline and remove the gas will be completed well away from the Hough Lane location so this work will have no impact on the local residents.  The new section of pipeline will be installed dead which means that no gas will be present on site.  The pipeline will then be thoroughly tested before the gas is re-introduced from the locations where it was shut down away from Hough Lane.  The supply of gas to local residents is maintained by lower pressure pipelines and will not be affected by these works.  What safeguards are in place to ensure that the initial estimate of 16 buses per hour crossing this junction (plus any future increase on this) will not damage the replaced pipe?  The design of National Grid high pressure pipelines includes significant risk margins which ensure that anticipated loads and stresses will not damage the pipeline.  The number of buses per hour crossing the bridge will have no bearing on the integrity of the pipeline as it is designed to withstand significantly greater stresses.   Please assure me that all steps will be taken to mitigate and minimise the disruption to residents, such that the works are completed on time or ahead of schedule; without compromising resident safety.  As previously stated, wherever possible, we will seek to minimise any disruption caused. This includes carrying works out over the summer months when the demand for gas is low and traffic flows across the road network are lower, ensuring pedestrians and dismounted cyclists are able to continue to use the route and alternative routes provided for drivers – the alternative route for traffic will be Sale Lane, Mosley Common Road, East Lancashire Road, Chaddock Lane and Manchester Road. Diversion signs will be in place in advance of the closure. In addition to this, we have sent letters to over 3,000 residents providing advance notice and details of these works and providing ways to contact us directly. A press release was issued, and subsequently details have been provided in the local press. In the coming weeks Balfour Beatty will also be sending out a newsletter providing an update on the scheme’s progress to over 8,000 properties – details of the Hough Lane closure will also be included. We have ensured that MPs and local councillors have been provided with information so they are able to assist the local community.  House visits have also been carried out by TfGM’s Project Manager and Stakeholder Officers to discuss the proposals and understand the concerns of the most affected residents. National Grid will also be working with those most affected to ensure disruption is kept to a minimum and concerns are addressed and accommodated wherever possible.  TfGM is also working with National Grid and Balfour Beatty to ensure these works are completed in the shortest time possible, whilst ensuring the safety of both the public and staff.   If you have any further queries in relation to the bus priority package, please do not hesitate to contact us at buspriority@tfgm.com or on 0300 123 1177.   Kind regards, David Eve BEng CEng MICE PMP Programme Manager – LSM Busway Transport for Greater Manchester Tyldesley_Focus
  • Score: 1

Comments are closed on this article.

Send us your news, pictures and videos

Most read stories

Local Info

Enter your postcode, town or place name

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree