Proud Peacock hails London support

The Bolton News: Jonnie Peacock celebrates with his gold medal after winning the 100 metres T44 final Jonnie Peacock celebrates with his gold medal after winning the 100 metres T44 final

Jonnie Peacock has hailed the home support that roared him to victory in the men's T44 sprint final, even though he had to quieten them down before the race began.

Peacock, 19, left his rivals, including Oscar Pistorius, trailing in his wake as he stormed to 100 metres gold in a Paralympic record 10.90 seconds at the Olympic Stadium. British fans, on a high after David Weir's third gold of the Games in the men's T54 800m, chanted Peacock's name before his race and the Cambridge sprinter had to call for quiet before the finalists went into their blocks.

Recalling the pre-race bedlam, Peacock told Channel 4: "That was absolutely mad. I knew Dave Weir would win before I went out and that the crowd would be on such a high but I didn't expect it would be as mad as it was. They were cheering so loud."

He added: "I went out there and thought 'I'm not going to block out the crowd, it's impossible'. Also, at the end of the day, I wanted to enjoy it. I'm so proud to be British and I do think the crowd has made these Paralympics. It will stay with me forever.

"I enjoyed it but then it's business time. We're professional athletes and you've got to be quiet for the set. I thought, 'I need to quieten them down, I didn't want to put anyone (the other finalists) off'. If you have to tell them to be quiet you have to tell them to be quiet."

Pistorius was quick to congratulate Peacock immediately after the race.

"It's a bit of a blur," said Peacock.

"All I remember is crossing the line thinking 'I've won' and then thinking 'have I won?' Then it came up on the board. I was so pleased and I just gave him (Pistorius) a big hug. He said 'I told you you'd do it'.

Peacock managed to keep calm before the race despite the noisy backing and the faulty start by Brazilian Alan Fonteles Oliveira.

"I felt so prepared for these Games that it's the first time I've entered a race and not felt nervous," he said. "I asked my coach - 'where are the nerves?' I think it was because I felt so prepared. Everything I'd done all year was leading up to last night."

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