Pupils from St James High School in Farnworth learn about autism

Farnworth pupils learn about autism

Sporting their blue ribbons with teaching assistant Faith Stansfield, who organised the week of events, are George Meekin, aged 14, Layla Klaju, aged 12, Tanya Pepper, aged 14, Stephanie Smith, aged 13 and Lewis Burns, aged 12

Sporting their blue ribbons with teaching assistant Faith Stansfield, who organised the week of events, are George Meekin, aged 14, Layla Klaju, aged 12, Tanya Pepper, aged 14, Stephanie Smith, aged 13 and Lewis Burns, aged 12

Sporting their blue ribbons with teaching assistant Faith Stansfield, who organised the week of events, are George Meekin, aged 14, Layla Klaju, aged 12, Tanya Pepper, aged 14, Stephanie Smith, aged 13 and Lewis Burns, aged 12

First published in News
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The Bolton News: Photograph of the Author by , education reporter

YOUNG people at St James’ CE High School marked World Autism Day by finding out more about the condition through a week-long series of activities.

The Farnworth school’s learning support department staged different events to raise awareness of the condition and inform pupils and staff on matters that surround those with autism spectrum disorder.

The school’s award-winning business Vend-A-Spend supplied ribbons and badges with some wearing a badge with the words “I know someone with autism and I am proud”.

Other activities including the department opening the sensory experience rooms to demonstrate one of the difficulties people with autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) face every day.

Hypersensitivity and hyposensitivity are terms used to describe how heightened or weak the sense might be for someone with ASD which can cause increased anxiety, stress and frustration; this can impact on learning, friendships and confidence.

The week ended with afternoon tea which gave staff and pupils the opportunity to meet the staff in leaning support, ask questions about autism and celebrate the week of activities.

Ian Singleton, the school's head of learning support, said: “We believe that all pupils, whatever their additional needs, should be given the opportunity to participate in the whole of school life.

“Sometimes this is difficult due to a number of factors or difficulties such as autism.

“It is therefore important for all pupils to be taught that pupils with autism have specific needs and difficulties and to understand what they can do to help them.”

Comments (1)

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11:38am Sat 26 Apr 14

Dinky Di says...

Congratulations to St.James' CE High School staff and pupils for taking the time and having the initiative to find out about Autism. As you will now know, it is a disorder that affects many people in society in various ways and although its sufferers can have a very wide range of abilities and disabilities from mild to severe, these are sometimes 'invisible' to neurotypical members of society. I have a son with an autism spectrum disorder who, although high functioning and now studying at college, was unmercifully bullied at school because of the lack of understanding of the nature of the disability.

I commend you all most highly and trust you will remember what you've learned and pass on your knowledge throughout future years. I thank you all sincerely for your endeavours.

Warm regards,
Mildred Batstone
Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
(formerly of Farnworth)
Congratulations to St.James' CE High School staff and pupils for taking the time and having the initiative to find out about Autism. As you will now know, it is a disorder that affects many people in society in various ways and although its sufferers can have a very wide range of abilities and disabilities from mild to severe, these are sometimes 'invisible' to neurotypical members of society. I have a son with an autism spectrum disorder who, although high functioning and now studying at college, was unmercifully bullied at school because of the lack of understanding of the nature of the disability. I commend you all most highly and trust you will remember what you've learned and pass on your knowledge throughout future years. I thank you all sincerely for your endeavours. Warm regards, Mildred Batstone Melbourne, Victoria, Australia (formerly of Farnworth) Dinky Di
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