Asperger's syndrome man wins diagnosis battle after complaint about 'discriminatory' assessment

First published in News

A MAN from Bolton was finally diagnosed with Asperger’s syndrome after his family wrote to NHS Bolton saying their policy about assessment was “discriminatory”.

The man, known only as Matthew, had shown signs of autism throughout his life but had never been able to access an assessment — and without a diagnosis he struggled to gain the support he needed.

His family contacted Irwin Mitchell Solicitors who wrote to the NHS in Bolton, arguing that their policy was discriminatory and went against the Autism Act statutory guidance, which sets out that every area in England should have a pathway to diagnosis for adults with suspected autism.

NHS Bolton offered the 35-year-old an assessment, which found that he had Asperger's syndrome, a form of autism, and since then has been able to access the support he needs.

Research carried out by The National Autistic Society (NAS) as part of the Push for Action campaign has shown that only 63 out of 152 local authorities in England have an autism diagnosis pathway in place.

Comments (6)

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6:59pm Tue 3 Sep 13

steveG says...

We are the sick man of the world and not in the physical sense.
What has the country come to when there's a scrabble to be registered disabled in order to better ones self.
We are the sick man of the world and not in the physical sense. What has the country come to when there's a scrabble to be registered disabled in order to better ones self. steveG
  • Score: -3

8:26pm Tue 3 Sep 13

CarlXVIGustaf says...

It's madness gone politically correct.
It's madness gone politically correct. CarlXVIGustaf
  • Score: 2

8:29pm Tue 3 Sep 13

Miltzy says...

steveG wrote:
We are the sick man of the world and not in the physical sense.
What has the country come to when there's a scrabble to be registered disabled in order to better ones self.
Did you actually read the article? He needed a diagnosis to access support. And the first sentence doesn't make sense.
[quote][p][bold]steveG[/bold] wrote: We are the sick man of the world and not in the physical sense. What has the country come to when there's a scrabble to be registered disabled in order to better ones self.[/p][/quote]Did you actually read the article? He needed a diagnosis to access support. And the first sentence doesn't make sense. Miltzy
  • Score: 0

9:37pm Tue 3 Sep 13

Citizen Cane says...

The article itself doesn't make sense: what does "support" actually mean?
The article itself doesn't make sense: what does "support" actually mean? Citizen Cane
  • Score: -4

10:55pm Tue 3 Sep 13

ferdys says...

The article makes sense to me. Aspergers is not understood or acknowledged by many, including organisations who should know better, like the NHS. Stories like this will help to improve that situation.
The article makes sense to me. Aspergers is not understood or acknowledged by many, including organisations who should know better, like the NHS. Stories like this will help to improve that situation. ferdys
  • Score: 3

12:14pm Thu 5 Sep 13

Darrennz says...

ferdys wrote:
The article makes sense to me. Aspergers is not understood or acknowledged by many, including organisations who should know better, like the NHS. Stories like this will help to improve that situation.
What this person said. How can the general public understand when medical institutions are not on the ball.
[quote][p][bold]ferdys[/bold] wrote: The article makes sense to me. Aspergers is not understood or acknowledged by many, including organisations who should know better, like the NHS. Stories like this will help to improve that situation.[/p][/quote]What this person said. How can the general public understand when medical institutions are not on the ball. Darrennz
  • Score: 2

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