Air pollution levels still high in Bolton after smog caused by Sahara dust storm

Air pollution levels still high in Bolton after Sahara dust storm

Think the smog is bad now? This is how it was in Churchgate in November 1968

Fog shrouds the junction of Beaumont Road and Chorley New Road in December 1969

First published in News The Bolton News: Photograph of the Author by , reporter

AIR pollution in Bolton is still higher than usual as the UK continues to grapple with the effects of sand whipped up by a storm in the Sahara desert.

The town's air quality index is set to be 5 for the rest of the day, which the Met Office classes as "moderate".

But much lower levels are forecast for Friday, Saturday and Sunday as the smog clears.

The elevated pollution levels have been caused by a combination of light south-easterly winds, the continental air flow and dust which has blown up from the Sahara desert.

A "very high" pollution level of 10 is predicted to hit the East Midlands today, with Liverpool and the Wirral predicted to experience "high" pollution later.

Prime minister David Cameron told the BBC this morning that he abandoned his morning run today in light of dense smog in London, which has also caused cyclists in the capital to wear masks.

He said: "It is unpleasant, and you can feel it in the air.

"The advice I would give to people is listen very carefully to what the Met Office is saying about the weather.

"I didn't go for my morning run this morning. I chose to do some work instead. You can feel it.

"But it's a naturally occurring weather phenomenon. It sounds extraordinary, Saharan dust, but that is what it is."

A low air quality level of 3 is forecast for Bolton tomorrow.

Comments (2)

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5:33pm Thu 3 Apr 14

boltonnut says...

Seems like anything foreign wants to settle in Bolton.
Seems like anything foreign wants to settle in Bolton. boltonnut
  • Score: 0

7:37am Fri 4 Apr 14

oftbewildered2 says...

I can remember the last big smog - it was the late 1960s. We got into the car to go to work (Bolton to Trafford Park) and could not see the end of the drive - we decided it was safer to take the day off. A few years before that I walked home from Manchester to Eccles (those were the days) - when I got home I want to get undressed for bed and my underskirt (one of those big starched things) was dripping with a thick black ooze almost like oil. We had breathed that in. Thank God for the clean air act and the widespread use of smokeless fuel - although of course we are just as polluted as there is more traffic; but the fogs are not as thick.
I can remember the last big smog - it was the late 1960s. We got into the car to go to work (Bolton to Trafford Park) and could not see the end of the drive - we decided it was safer to take the day off. A few years before that I walked home from Manchester to Eccles (those were the days) - when I got home I want to get undressed for bed and my underskirt (one of those big starched things) was dripping with a thick black ooze almost like oil. We had breathed that in. Thank God for the clean air act and the widespread use of smokeless fuel - although of course we are just as polluted as there is more traffic; but the fogs are not as thick. oftbewildered2
  • Score: -2

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