Bolton teenagers back plan to ban 'glitzy' cigarette packaging

Getting the message across are, from left,Tresor Mbuyi, Yasmin Qureshi, Ryan Wallwork and Emily Raby

Getting the message across are, from left,Tresor Mbuyi, Yasmin Qureshi, Ryan Wallwork and Emily Raby

First published in News The Bolton News: Photograph of the Author by , health reporter

A CAMPAIGN to ban “glitzy” cigarette packs has been backed by three Bolton teenagers.

They joined Bolton south east MP Yasmin Qureshi who is urging the government to implement a law to protect children from branded cigarette packaging.

The three met Ms Qureshi to discuss the campaign for plain packaging which is led by social enterprise Tobacco Free Futures.

Ryan Wallwork, aged 17, from Moses Gate, and a member of Bolton Youth Council, said: “It’s really disgusting how openly the packs are targeted at teenagers.

"I think standard packs would be a good idea because young people might not be tempted to smoke if the packs didn’t look so cool and trendy.”

Emily Raby, aged 16, from Farnworth, and also a member of Bolton Youth Council, said: “I was shocked at some of the cigarette pack designs because they’re so glitzy and glamorous.

"I think standard packs could help make people my age less likely to want to take up smoking.”

Sixteen-year-old Tresor Mbuyi, from Bolton, is also backing the campaign.

An independent review on standardised packaging by Sir Cyril Chantler suggested the measure will reduce the number of children who smoke.

Ms Qureshi said: “Any measure that has the ability to save thousands of lives is positive and so I am fully supportive of the introduction of standardised tobacco packaging.

“More than 200,000 young people in the UK start to smoke every year and two-thirds of all smokers start before age 18.

"Legislation would prevent glitzy cigarette packaging enticing young people to take up such a dangerous addiction at an age where they may not be aware of the consequences.”

A consultation is now underway following the publication of draft regulations and then MPs will vote in parliament .

Opponents argue plain packaging would be damaging for retailers and lead to influx of “fake” cigarettes in the market.

Comments (2)

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11:03am Wed 23 Jul 14

stereo_world says...

What a load of tosh. I don't know where they get their research from, but people don't start smoking because of glitzy packaging. It's because of the image smoking portrays.

If they're going down this route, why don't they just dye the actual cigarettes a pink colour? That's equally as ridiculous, but more likely to work than this.
What a load of tosh. I don't know where they get their research from, but people don't start smoking because of glitzy packaging. It's because of the image smoking portrays. If they're going down this route, why don't they just dye the actual cigarettes a pink colour? That's equally as ridiculous, but more likely to work than this. stereo_world
  • Score: 5

8:44am Thu 24 Jul 14

Mike19 says...

That is great for them....once plain packaging is accepted they will be able to buy very cheap counterfeit and illicit trade fags at half the price and be able to smoke more!!......why do not people realise that there is no evidence that packaging causes smokers to start smoking!!...Mike19
That is great for them....once plain packaging is accepted they will be able to buy very cheap counterfeit and illicit trade fags at half the price and be able to smoke more!!......why do not people realise that there is no evidence that packaging causes smokers to start smoking!!...Mike19 Mike19
  • Score: 0

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